List of FIFA World Cup records and statistics

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This is a list of records of the FIFA World Cup and its qualification matches.

General statistics by tournament[edit]

Year Host Champion Winning coach Top scorer(s) Best player award[1][2]
1930  Uruguay  Uruguay Uruguay Alberto Suppici Argentina Guillermo Stábile (8) N/A
1934  Italy  Italy Italy Vittorio Pozzo Czechoslovakia Oldřich Nejedlý (5)
1938  France  Italy Italy Vittorio Pozzo Brazil Leônidas (7)
1950  Brazil  Uruguay Uruguay Juan López Brazil Ademir (8)
1954   Switzerland  West Germany West Germany Sepp Herberger Hungary Sándor Kocsis (11)
1958  Sweden  Brazil Brazil Vicente Feola France Just Fontaine (13)
1962  Chile  Brazil Brazil Aymoré Moreira Brazil Garrincha (4)
Brazil Vavá (4)
Chile Leonel Sánchez (4)
Hungary Flórián Albert (4)
Soviet Union Valentin Ivanov (4)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dražan Jerković (4)
1966  England  England England Alf Ramsey Portugal Eusébio (9)
1970  Mexico  Brazil Brazil Mário Zagallo West Germany Gerd Müller (10)
1974  West Germany  West Germany West Germany Helmut Schön Poland Grzegorz Lato (7)
1978  Argentina  Argentina Argentina César Luis Menotti Argentina Mario Kempes (6)
1982  Spain  Italy Italy Enzo Bearzot Italy Paolo Rossi (6) Italy Paolo Rossi
1986  Mexico  Argentina Argentina Carlos Bilardo England Gary Lineker (6) Argentina Diego Maradona
1990  Italy  West Germany West Germany Franz Beckenbauer Italy Salvatore Schillaci (6) Italy Salvatore Schillaci
1994  United States  Brazil Brazil Carlos Alberto Parreira Bulgaria Hristo Stoichkov (6)
Russia Oleg Salenko (6)
Brazil Romário
1998  France  France France Aimé Jacquet Croatia Davor Šuker (6) Brazil Ronaldo
2002  South Korea
 Japan
 Brazil Brazil Luiz Felipe Scolari Brazil Ronaldo (8) Germany Oliver Kahn
2006  Germany  Italy Italy Marcello Lippi Germany Miroslav Klose (5) France Zinedine Zidane
2010  South Africa  Spain Spain Vicente del Bosque Germany Thomas Müller (5)
Netherlands Wesley Sneijder (5)
Spain David Villa (5)
Uruguay Diego Forlán (5)
Uruguay Diego Forlán
2014  Brazil  Germany Germany Joachim Löw Colombia James Rodríguez (6) Argentina Lionel Messi
2018  Russia  France France Didier Deschamps England Harry Kane (6) Croatia Luka Modrić

Teams: Tournament position[edit]

Teams having equal quantities in the tables below are ordered by the tournament the quantity was attained in (the teams that attained the quantity first are listed first). If the quantity was attained by more than one team in the same tournament, these teams are ordered alphabetically.

Most titles won
5,  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002)
Most finishes in the top two
8,  Germany (1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2014)
Most finishes in the top three
12,  Germany (1934, 1954, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014)
Most finishes in the top four
13,  Germany (1934, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1982, 1986, 1990, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014)
For a detailed list of top four appearances, see FIFA World Cup results
Most finishes in the top eight
18,  Brazil (every tournament except 1934, 1966 and 1990)[a]
Most finishes in the top sixteen
21,  Brazil (every tournament)
Most World Cup appearances
21,  Brazil (every tournament)
For a detailed list, see National team appearances in the FIFA World Cup.
Most second-place finishes
4,  Germany (1966, 1982, 1986, 2002)
Most third-place finishes
4,  Germany (1934, 1970, 2006, 2010)
Most fourth-place finishes
3,  Uruguay (1954, 1970, 2010)
Most 3rd-4th-place finishes
5,  Germany (1934, 1958, 1970, 2006, 2010)
Most 5th-8th-place finishes
8,  England (1950, 1954, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 2002, 2006)[b]
Most 9th-16th-place finishes
14,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)[c]
Most 17th-32nd-place finishes
7,  South Korea (1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006, 2014, 2018)
Most titles won by a confederation
12, UEFA (1934, 1938, 1954, 1966, 1974, 1982, 1990, 1998, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
Confederation with most number of teams who qualified for the finals at least once
90% (9 out of 10), CONMEBOL (all but Venezuela)
Confederation with fewest teams who qualified for the finals at least once
15.38% (2 out of 11 current and 2 former), OFC (only Australia and New Zealand)

Consecutive[edit]

Most consecutive championships
2,  Italy (1934–1938) and  Brazil (1958–1962)
Most consecutive finishes in the top two
3,  Germany (1982–1990) and  Brazil (1994–2002)
Most consecutive finishes in the top three
4,  Germany (2002–2014)
Most consecutive finishes in the top four
4,  Germany (2002–2014)
Most consecutive finishes in the top eight
16,  Germany (1954–2014)
Most consecutive finishes in the top sixteen
21,  Brazil (1930–2018)[d]
Most consecutive finals tournaments
21,  Brazil (1930–2018)
Most consecutive second-place finishes
2,  Netherlands (1974–1978) and  West Germany (1982–1986)
Most consecutive third-place finishes
2,  Germany (2006–2010)
Most consecutive fourth-place finishes
No country has finished 4th in two consecutive tournaments
Most consecutive 3rd-4th-place finishes
2,  Sweden (1938–1950),  Brazil (1974–1978),  France (1982–1986),  Germany (2006–2010)
Most consecutive 5th-8th-place finishes
4,   Switzerland (1934–1954)[e]
Most consecutive 9th-16th-place finishes
7,  Mexico (1994–2018)
Most consecutive 17th-32nd-place finishes
4,  South Korea (1986–1998)
Biggest improvement in position in consecutive tournaments
Did not participate/qualify, then champion,  Italy (1930–1934),  Uruguay (1938–1950),  West Germany (1950–1954),  France (1994–1998)
Most consecutive championships by a confederation
4, UEFA (2006–2018)

Gaps[edit]

Longest gap between successive titles
44 years,  Italy (1938–1982)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two
48 years,  Argentina (1930–1978)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top three
48 years,  Argentina (1930–1978)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four
60 years,  Spain (1950–2010)
Longest gap between successive appearances in the finals
56 years:  Egypt (1934–1990),  Norway (1938–1994)[f]

Host team[edit]

Best finish by host team
Champion:  Uruguay (1930),  Italy (1934),  England (1966),  West Germany (1974),  Argentina (1978),  France (1998)
Worst finish by host team
17th–32nd position (FIFA final ranking of 20th):  South Africa (2010)

Defending champion[edit]

Best finish by defending champion
Champion:  Italy (1938),  Brazil (1962)
Worst finish by defending champion
Did not participate:  Uruguay (1934)
Worst finish by defending champion who participates in the next tournament
Group stage:  Italy (1950),  Brazil (1966),  France (2002),  Italy (2010),  Spain (2014),  Germany (2018)

Debuting teams[edit]

Best finish by a debuting team
Champion:  Uruguay (1930),  Italy (1934)[g]
Best finish by a debuting team after 1934
Third place:  Portugal (1966),  Croatia (1998)

Other[edit]

Most finishes in the top two without ever being champion
3,  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010)
Most finishes in the top three without ever being champion
4,  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 2010, 2014)
Most finishes in the top four without ever being champion
5,  Netherlands (1974, 1978, 1998, 2010, 2014)
Most appearances, never progressing from the first round
8,  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)[h]
Most finals played, never lost
2,  Uruguay (1930, 1950)[i]
Most semifinals played, never lost
5,  Argentina (1930, 1978, 1986, 1990, 2014)[j]
Most quarterfinals (or best eight round) played, never lost
2,  Croatia (1998, 2018) and  Portugal (1966, 2006)
Most round of sixteen (from 1986 to date) played, never lost
8,  Germany (1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014)
Most appearances, never winning a match
3,  Bolivia (1930, 1950, 1994),  Honduras (1982, 2010, 2014),  Egypt (1934, 1990, 2018)
Most played final
3,  Argentina vs  Germany (1986, 1990, 2014)

Teams: Tournament progress[edit]

All time[edit]

Most appearances in the first round
21,  Brazil (every tournament)
Progressed from the first round the most times
18,  Brazil (every tournament except 1930, 1934 and 1966)
Progressed from the first round as group winners the most times
15,  Brazil (1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018)
Eliminated in the first round the most times
8,  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
Most appearances, always progressing from the first round
3,  Republic of Ireland (1990, 1994, 2002)[k]
Most appearances, never progressing from the first round
8,  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)[h]
Fewest appearances, reaching quarter-finals
1,  Cuba (1938),  Wales (1958),  East Germany (1974),  Ukraine (2006)
Most appearances, never reaching quarter-finals
8,  Scotland (1954, 1958, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998)
Fewest appearances, reaching semi-finals
2,  Turkey (2002)
Most appearances, never reaching semi-finals
16,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
Fewest appearances, reaching a final
5,  Croatia (2018)
Most appearances, never reaching a final
16,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)
Fewest appearances, winning a title
13,  Uruguay (1930, 1950)
Most appearances, never winning a title
16,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)

Consecutive[edit]

Most consecutive appearances in the first round
21,  Brazil (every tournament)
Most consecutive progressions from the first round
16,  Germany (1954–2014)
Most consecutive progressions from the first round as group winners
10,  Brazil (1982–2018)
Most consecutive eliminations from the first round
5,  Mexico (1950–1966),  Scotland (1974–1990)
Most consecutive result by the same team
7, Round of 16,  Mexico (1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018)

Population[edit]

Most populated participant
 China PR (2002), 1.280.000.000
Least populated participant
 Iceland (2018), 348.000
Most populated champion
 Brazil (2002), 179.300.000
Least populated champion
 Uruguay (1930), 1.730.000

Host team[edit]

Host team eliminated in the first round
 South Africa (2010)

Defending champion[edit]

Defending champion eliminated in the first round
 Italy (1950),  Brazil (1966),  France (2002),  Italy (2010),  Spain (2014),  Germany (2018)

All-time table[edit]

Players[edit]

Most championships
3, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958, 1962 (only played in first two matches; medal awarded retroactively by FIFA in 2007[3]) and 1970)
See here for a list of players who have won multiple FIFA World Cups.
Most tournaments played
5, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico, 1950–1966), Lothar Matthäus (Germany Germany, 1982–1998), Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2018)
Most tournaments on national team
5, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico, 1950–1966), Lothar Matthäus (Germany Germany, 1982–1998), Gianluigi Buffon ( Italy, 1998 (did not play), 2002–2014), Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2018)
Most finishes in the top two 
3, Nílton Santos ( Brazil 1950, 1958, 1962), Pelé ( Brazil 1958, 1962, 1970), Pierre Littbarski ( West Germany 1982, 1986, 1990), Lothar Matthäus ( West Germany 1982, 1986, 1990), Cafu ( Brazil, 1994, 1998, 2002), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1994, 1998, 2002)
Most finishes in the top three 
4, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014)
Most appearances in All-Star Team
3, Djalma Santos ( Brazil, 1954–1962), Franz Beckenbauer ( West Germany, 1966–1974), Philipp Lahm ( Germany, 2006–2014)
Most matches played, finals
25, Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, 1982–1998)
Most knockout games played, finals
14, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014)
Most minutes played, finals
2,217 minutes, Paolo Maldini ( Italy, 1990–2002)
Most matches played, qualifying
68, Iván Hurtado ( Ecuador, 1994–2010)
Most matches won
17, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014)
Most appearances in a World Cup final
3, Cafu ( Brazil, 1994, 1998, 2002)[l]
Most finals played with different teams
2, Luis Monti ( Argentina, 1930 and  Italy, 1934)
Most appearances as captain
17, Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2018)[4]
Most tournaments as captain
5, Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2018)[4]
Most appearances as substitute
11, Denílson ( Brazil, 1998–2002)
Youngest player
17 years, 41 days, Norman Whiteside ( Northern Ireland), vs Yugoslavia, 17 June 1982
Youngest player, final
17 years, 249 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs Sweden, 29 June 1958
Youngest player, qualifying match
13 years, 310 days, Souleymane Mamam ( Togo), vs Zambia, 6 May 2001, 2002 CAF Group 1[m]
Youngest captain
21 years, 109 days, Tony Meola ( United States), vs Czechoslovakia, 10 June 1990[n]
Youngest player to ever be named to a FIFA World Cup squad
16 years, 339 days, Edu ( Brazil), 1966
Oldest player
45 years, 161 days, Essam El-Hadary ( Egypt), vs Saudi Arabia, 25 June 2018
Oldest player, final
40 years, 133 days, Dino Zoff ( Italy), vs West Germany, 11 July 1982
Oldest player, qualifying match
46 years, 175 days, MacDonald Taylor Sr. ( U.S. Virgin Islands), vs Saint Kitts and Nevis, 18 February 2004, 2006 CONCACAF First Round.[6]
Oldest captain
45 years, 161 days, Essam El-Hadary ( Egypt), vs Saudi Arabia, 25 June 2018
Oldest player to debut in a World Cup finals tournament
45 years, 161 days, Essam El-Hadary ( Egypt), vs Saudi Arabia, 25 June 2018
Oldest player to ever be named to a FIFA World Cup squad
45 years, 150 days, Essam El-Hadary ( Egypt), 2018[7]
Largest age difference on the same team
24 years and 42 days, 1994,  Cameroon (Rigobert Song: 17 years and 358 days; Roger Milla: 42 years and 35 days)
Largest age difference on a champion team
21 years and 297 days, 1982,  Italy (Dino Zoff: 40 years and 133 days; Giuseppe Bergomi: 18 years and 201 days)
Longest period between World Cup finals appearances as a player
15 years and 363 days, Faryd Mondragón ( Colombia, 1998–2014)
Longest span of World Cup finals appearances as a player
16 years, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico, 1950–1966); Elías Figueroa ( Chile, 1966–1982); Hugo Sánchez ( Mexico, 1978–1994); Giuseppe Bergomi ( Italy, 1982–1998); Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, 1982–1998); Rigobert Song ( Cameroon, 1994–2010); Faryd Mondragón ( Colombia, 1998–2014); Samuel Eto'o ( Cameroon, 1998–2014); Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2018)
Longest period between World Cup finals appearances, overall
44 years, Tim ( Brazil, 1938, as a player; and  Peru, 1982, as coach)

Goalscoring[edit]

Individual[edit]

Most goals scored, overall finals
16, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014)[4]
Most goals scored, overall qualifying
39, Carlos Ruiz ( Guatemala, 2002–2016)[8]
Most goals scored in a tournament
13, Just Fontaine ( France, 1958)[4]
Highest goals average in a tournament, and overall
4.00, Ernest Wilimowski ( Poland, 4 goals in 1 match, 1938)
For a detailed list of top goalscorers in each tournament (Golden Boot winner), see Golden Boot.
Most goals scored in a match
5, Oleg Salenko ( Russia), vs Cameroon, 1994[4]
Most goals scored in a lost match
4, Ernest Wilimowski ( Poland), vs Brazil, 1938
Most goals scored in a qualifying match
13, Archie Thompson ( Australia), vs American Samoa, 2002 OFC Group 1
Most goals scored in a final match
3, Geoff Hurst ( England), vs West Germany, 1966
Most goals scored in all final matches
3, Vavá ( Brazil), 2 vs Sweden in 1958 & 1 vs Czechoslovakia in 1962; Pelé ( Brazil), 2 vs Sweden in 1958 & 1 vs Italy in 1970; Geoff Hurst ( England), 3 vs West Germany in 1966 and Zinedine Zidane ( France), 2 vs Brazil in 1998 & 1 vs Italy in 2006
Scored goal(s) in multiple final matches
Vavá ( Brazil, 1958 & 1962), Pelé ( Brazil, 1958 & 1970), Paul Breitner ( West Germany, 1974 & 1982) and Zinedine Zidane ( France, 1998 & 2006).
Most matches with at least one goal
11, Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014)
Most consecutive matches with at least one goal
6, Just Fontaine ( France, 1958) and Jairzinho ( Brazil, 1970)
Most matches with at least two goals
4, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine ( France, 1958), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010)
Most consecutive matches with at least two goals
4, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954)
Most hat-tricks
2, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine ( France, 1958), Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1970) and Gabriel Batistuta ( Argentina, 1994 & 1998)
Most consecutive hat-tricks
2, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954) and Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1970)
Fastest hat-trick
8 minutes, László Kiss ( Hungary), scored at 69', 72' and 76', vs El Salvador, 1982
Most goals scored by a substitute in a match
3, László Kiss ( Hungary), vs El Salvador, 1982
Olympic goals (goals from a corner) scored in a World Cup
1, Marcos Coll ( Colombia), vs Soviet Union, 1962
Hat-tricks from the penalty spot
Never occurred in the final tournament, four times in qualification: Kubilay Türkyilmaz (  Switzerland), vs Faroe Islands, 7 October 2000, 2002 UEFA Group 1; Henrik Larsson ( Sweden), vs Moldova, 6 June 2001, 2002 UEFA Group 4; Ronaldo ( Brazil), vs Argentina, 2 June 2004, 2006 CONMEBOL; Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang ( Gabon), vs Niger, 15 June 2013, 2014 CAF Second Round Group E
Scoring in every match of a team in a World Cup (at least three matches)
György Sárosi ( Hungary), 5 goals in 4 matches (1938), Arne Nyberg ( Sweden), 3 goals in 3 matches (1938), Alcides Ghiggia ( Uruguay), 4 goals in 4 matches (1950), Just Fontaine ( France), 13 goals in 6 matches (1958), Omar Oreste Corbatta ( Argentina), 3 goals in 3 matches (1958), Ferenc Bene ( Hungary), 4 goals in 4 matches (1966), Jairzinho ( Brazil), 7 goals in 6 matches (1970), Teófilo Cubillas ( Peru), 5 goals in 4 matches (1970), James Rodríguez ( Colombia), 6 goals in 5 matches (2014)
Most tournaments with at least one goal
4, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958–1970), Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014) and Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2006–2018)
Most tournaments with at least two goals
4, Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014)
Most tournaments with at least three goals
3, Jürgen Klinsmann ( Germany, 1990–1998), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010)
Most tournaments with at least four goals
3, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010)
Most tournaments with at least five goals
2, Teófilo Cubillas ( Peru, 1970, 1978), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, (2002–2006) and Thomas Müller ( Germany, 2010–2014)
Most qualification tournaments with at least one goal
5, Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2018) and Carlos Ruiz ( Guatemala, 2002–2018)
Longest period between a player's first and last goals
12 years, 1 month and 7 days; Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 1 June 2002 – 8 July 2014)
Longest period between a player's first and last goals overall
12 years, Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 8 June 1958 – 14 June 1970), Pelé ( Brazil, 19 June 1958 – 21 June 1970), Diego Maradona ( Argentina, 18 June 1982 – 21 June 1994), Michael Laudrup ( Denmark, 8 June 1986 – 24 June 1998), Henrik Larsson ( Sweden, 16 July 1994 – 20 June 2006), Sami Al-Jaber ( Saudi Arabia, 25 June 1994 – 14 June 2006), Cuauhtémoc Blanco ( Mexico, 20 June 1998 – 17 June 2010), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 1 June 2002 – 8 July 2014), Ivica Olić ( Croatia, 8 June 2002 – 18 June 2014), Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 17 June 2006 – 20 June 2018) and Lionel Messi ( Argentina 16 June 2006 – 26 June 2018)
Longest period between one goal and another
12 years, Michael Laudrup ( Denmark, 1986–1998) and Ivica Olić ( Croatia, 2002–2014)
First goalscorer
Lucien Laurent ( France), vs Mexico, 13 July 1930
Youngest goalscorer
17 years, 239 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs Wales, 19 June 1958
Youngest hat-trick scorer
17 years, 244 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs France, 24 June 1958
Youngest goalscorer, final
17 years, 249 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs Sweden, 29 June 1958
Oldest goalscorer
42 years, 39 days, Roger Milla ( Cameroon), vs Russia, 28 June 1994
Oldest hat-trick scorer
33 years, 130 days, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal), vs Spain, 15 June 2018
Oldest goalscorer, final
35 years, 264 days, Nils Liedholm ( Sweden), vs Brazil, 29 June 1958
Only player to score in his teens, his twenties and his thirties
Lionel Messi  Argentina (2006, 2014, and 2018)[9][10]
Most penalties scored (excluding during shoot-outs)
4, Eusébio ( Portugal, 4 in 1966), Rob Rensenbrink ( Netherlands, 4 in 1978) – both records for one tournament – and Gabriel Batistuta ( Argentina, 2 each in 1994 and 1998)
Most penalties missed (excluding during shoot-outs)
2, Asamoah Gyan ( Ghana), vs Czech Republic, 2006 and vs Uruguay, 2010
First substitute winning goalscorer, final
Came on 86th minute, Mario Götze ( Germany), vs Argentina, 2014
Fastest goal from kickoff
11 seconds, Hakan Şükür ( Turkey), vs South Korea, 2002
Fastest goal by a substitute
16 seconds, Ebbe Sand ( Denmark), vs Nigeria, 1998
Fastest goal in a final
90 seconds, Johan Neeskens ( Netherlands), vs West Germany, 1974 final
Fastest goal in a qualifying match
8.1 seconds, Christian Benteke ( Belgium), vs Gibraltar, 2018 UEFA Group H[11]
Fastest brace scored
69 seconds, Toni Kroos ( Germany), vs Brazil, 2014
Latest goal in regular time
97th minute, Neymar ( Brazil), vs Costa Rica, 2018
Latest goal from kickoff
121st minute, Alessandro Del Piero ( Italy), vs Germany, 2006 and Abdelmoumene Djabou ( Algeria), vs Germany, 2014
Latest goal from kickoff in a final
120th minute, Geoff Hurst ( England), vs Germany, 1966 (see "They think it's all over")
Latest goal from kickoff, with no goals scored between
119th minute, David Platt ( England), vs Belgium, 1990 and Fabio Grosso ( Italy), vs Germany, 2006
Latest goal from kickoff in a final, with no goals scored between
116th minute, Andrés Iniesta ( Spain), vs Netherlands, 2010
Most participations in different World Cup penalty shoot-outs
3 times, Roberto Baggio  Italy (1990, converted, 1994, missed, and 1998, converted)

Own goals[edit]

Assisting[edit]

Most assists provided, overall finals
10, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958-1970)
Most assists provided in a tournament
7, Pelé ( Brazil, 1970)
Most assists provided in finals
3, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958 and 1970)
Most tournaments with at least one assist
4, Lionel Messi ( Argentina, 2006-2018)[12]
Most consecutive tournaments with at least one assist
4, Lionel Messi ( Argentina, 2006-2018)[12]

Penalties[edit]

By team[edit]

Most awarded
Most converted
Most missed or saved

By tournament[edit]

Most awarded
Most converted
Most missed or saved

Penalty shoot-outs[edit]

By team[edit]

Most played
  • 5,  Argentina (1990, 1990, 1998, 2006, 2014)
Most played in one tournament
Most won
Most won in one tournament
Most lost
  • 3,  England (1990, 1998, 2006),  Italy (1990, 1994, 1998) and  Spain (1986, 2002, 2018)
Most played shoot-out

By tournament[edit]

Most played
Fewest played (since the introduction in 1978)

Extra time[edit]

By team[edit]

Most played
Most tournaments playing extra time
Most consecutive tournaments playing extra time
Most played in one tournament
Most consecutive played in one tournament
Most won (excluding replays and shoot-outs)
Most lost (excluding replays and shoot-outs)
Most won in one tournament (excluding replays and shoot-outs)
Most consecutive won in one tournament (excluding replays and shoot-outs)
Most played match
Most consecutive played match

By tournament[edit]

Most played
Most played, not ending in replays or shoot-outs
Most played ending in replays
Most played ending in shoot-outs
Most played ending in a golden goal (sudden death)
Fewest played

Tiebreakers[edit]

Cases when replays were used
Cases when play-offs were used
Cases when drawing of lots was used
Cases when fair play was used

Goalkeeping[edit]

Most clean sheets (matches without conceding)
10, Peter Shilton ( England, 1982–1990) and Fabien Barthez ( France, 1998–2006)[4]
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (finals)
517 mins (5 consecutive clean sheets), Walter Zenga ( Italy, 1990)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (qualifying)
921 mins (9 consecutive clean sheets[o]), Richard Wilson ( New Zealand, 1982)
Most goals conceded
25, Antonio Carbajal ( Mexico) and Mohamed Al-Deayea ( Saudi Arabia)
Most goals conceded, one tournament
16, Hong Duk-Yung ( South Korea), 1954
Most goals conceded, one match
10, Luis Guevara Mora ( El Salvador), 1982 (vs  Hungary)
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament, champions
2, Fabien Barthez ( France), 1998, Gianluigi Buffon ( Italy, 2006) and Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2010)
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament
0, Pascal Zuberbühler (  Switzerland), 2006[p]
Fewest goals conceded, penalty shoot-outs, one match
0, Oleksandr Shovkovskiy ( Ukraine), vs   Switzerland, 2006
Most penalties saved, one tournament (excluding during shoot-outs)
2, Jan Tomaszewski ( Poland), 1974 and Brad Friedel ( United States), 2002
Most penalties saved overall (excluding during shoot-outs)
2, Jan Tomaszewski ( Poland, both in 1974), Brad Friedel ( United States, both in 2002), and Iker Casillas ( Spain, 1 in 2002 and 1 in 2010)
Most penalties saved in one penalty shoot-out
3, Ricardo ( Portugal), vs  England, 2006 and Danijel Subašić ( Croatia), vs  Denmark, 2018
Most penalties saved overall in penalty shoot-outs
4, Harald Schumacher ( Germany, 2 vs  France in 1982 and 2 vs  Mexico in 1986), Sergio Goycochea ( Argentina, 2 vs  Yugoslavia in 1990 and 2 vs  Italy in 1990), and Danijel Subašić ( Croatia, 3 vs  Denmark, 2018 and 1 vs  Russia, 2018)[14]
Youngest goalkeeper
19 years, 191 days, Lee Chang-myung ( North Korea), vs Soviet Union, 12 July 1966
Youngest goalkeeper to save a penalty (excluding during shoot-outs)
21 years, 27 days, Iker Casillas ( Spain), vs Republic of Ireland, 16 June 2002
Youngest goalkeeper to save a penalty in a shoot-out
21 years, 27 days, Iker Casillas ( Spain), vs Republic of Ireland, 16 June 2002
Oldest goalkeeper
45 years, 161 days, Essam El-Hadary ( Egypt), vs Saudi Arabia, 25 June 2018
Oldest goalkeeper to save a penalty (excluding during shoot-outs)
45 years, 161 days, Essam El-Hadary ( Egypt), vs Saudi Arabia, 25 June 2018
Oldest goalkeeper to save a penalty in a shoot-out
36 years, 232 days, Jens Lehmann ( Germany), vs Argentina, 30 June 2006

Coaching[edit]

Most matches coached
25, Helmut Schön ( West Germany, 1966–1978)
Most matches won
16, Helmut Schön ( West Germany, 1966–1978)
Most tournaments won
2, Vittorio Pozzo ( Italy, 1934–1938)
Most tournaments
6, Carlos Alberto Parreira (1982, 1990–1998, 2006, 2010)
Most nations coached
5, Bora Milutinović ( Mexico, 1986;  Costa Rica, 1990;  United States, 1994;  Nigeria, 1998;  China PR, 2002), and Carlos Alberto Parreira ( Kuwait, 1982;  United Arab Emirates, 1990;  Brazil, 1994 and 2006;  Saudi Arabia, 1998,  South Africa, 2010)
Most consecutive tournaments with same team
4, Walter Winterbottom ( England, 1950–1962); Helmut Schön ( West Germany, 1966–1978) (note that Sepp Herberger took Germany/West Germany to four tournaments, (1938, 1954, 1958, 1962) omitting the 1950 competition from which Germany was banned)
Most consecutive wins
11, Luiz Felipe Scolari ( Brazil, 2002, 7 wins;  Portugal, 2006, 4 wins – Portugal "won" its next match, the quarter-final against England, by penalty shoot-out, which technically counts as a draw)
Most consecutive matches without a loss
12, Luiz Felipe Scolari ( Brazil, 2002, 7 matches;  Portugal, 2006, 5 matches)
Youngest coach
27 years, 267 days, Juan José Tramutola ( Argentina, 1930)
Youngest coach, champions
31 years, 252 days, Alberto Suppici ( Uruguay, 1930)
Oldest coach
71 years, 317 days, Otto Rehhagel ( Greece, 2010)
Oldest coach, champions
59 years, 200 days, Vicente del Bosque ( Spain, 2010)
Quickest substitution made
4th minute, Cesare Maldini, Giuseppe Bergomi for Alessandro Nesta ( Italy, vs Austria, 1998); Sven-Göran Eriksson, Peter Crouch for Michael Owen ( England, vs Sweden, 2006)
Most championship wins as player and head coach
3, Mário Zagallo,  Brazil (1958 & 1962 as player, 1970 as coach)[q]
Most tournament appearances as player and head coach
5, Mário Zagallo,  Brazil (1958 & 1962 as player, 1970, 1974 & 1998 as coach); Franz Beckenbauer,  West Germany (1966–1974 as player, 1986 & 1990 as coach); Berti Vogts,  West Germany (1970–1978 as player, 1994 & 1998 as coach); Diego Maradona,  Argentina (1982–1994 as player, 2010 as coach)
Won tournaments as both player and head coach
Mário Zagallo,  Brazil (1958 & 1962 as player, 1970 as coach), Franz Beckenbauer,  West Germany (1974 as player, 1990 as coach) and Didier Deschamps,  France (1998 as player, 2018 as coach)
First World Cup player to coach a team in a World Cup
Milorad Arsenijević,  Serbia (1930 as player, 1950 as coach, both times for  Yugoslavia)
Won tournament as a foreign head coach
No foreign coach has won a tournament (all winning head coaches were natives of the country they coached)
Best finish for a foreign head coach
Runners-up, George Raynor (England England, coached  Sweden in 1958) and Ernst Happel (Austria Austria, coached  Netherlands in 1978)

Refereeing[edit]

Most tournaments
3 – John Langenus (Belgium Belgium, 1930–1938), Ivan Eklind (Sweden Sweden, 1934–1950), Benjamin Griffiths (Wales Wales, 1950–1958), Arthur Ellis (England England, 1950–1958), Juan Gardeazábal (Spain Spain, 1958–1966), Jamal Al Sharif (Syria Syria, 1986–1994), Joël Quiniou (France France, 1986–1994), Ali Mohamed Bujsaim (United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates, 1994–2002), Óscar Ruiz (Colombia Colombia, 2002–2010), Carlos Eugênio Simon (Brazil Brazil, 2002–2010), Marco Rodríguez (Mexico Mexico, 2006–2014), Joel Aguilar (El Salvador El Salvador, 2010–2018), Ravshan Irmatov (Uzbekistan Uzbekistan, 2010–2018)
Most matches refereed, overall
11 – Ravshan Irmatov (Uzbekistan Uzbekistan, 2010–2018)
Most matches refereed, one tournament
5 – Benito Archundia (Mexico Mexico, 2006), Horacio Elizondo (Argentina Argentina, 2006), Ravshan Irmatov (Uzbekistan Uzbekistan, 2010) and Néstor Pitana (Argentina Argentina, 2018)
Youngest referee
24 years and 193 days – Juan Gardeazábal (Spain Spain, 1958)
Oldest referee
53 years and 236 days – George Reader (England England, 1950)

Discipline[edit]

Note: There are no official records for cautions issued in tournaments before the introduction of yellow cards in 1970.[15]

Fastest caution
11 seconds, Jesús Gallardo ( Mexico), vs  Sweden, 2018
Fastest sending off
56 seconds, José Batista ( Uruguay), vs  Scotland, 1986
Fastest sending off, qualification
37 seconds, Rashed Al Hooti ( Bahrain), vs  Iran, 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification
Latest caution
during penalty shoot-out: Edinho ( Brazil), vs  France 1986; Carlos Roa ( Argentina), vs  England, 1998
Latest sending off
after penalty shoot-out: Leandro Cufré ( Argentina), vs  Germany, 2006 (Cufré was red carded for kicking Per Mertesacker in an altercation following the match)
Sent off from the bench
Claudio Caniggia ( Argentina), vs  Sweden, 2002
Most cards (all-time, player)
7, Javier Mascherano ( Argentina, 2006–2018)[16]
Most cautions (all-time, player)
7, Javier Mascherano ( Argentina, 2006–2018)[16]
Most sendings off (all-time, player)
2, Rigobert Song ( Cameroon, 1994 and 1998) and Zinedine Zidane ( France, 1998 and 2006)
Most sendings off (tournament)
28 (in 64 games), 2006
Most sendings off (all-time, team)
11 (in 97 games),  Brazil
Most sendings off (match, both teams)
4 (2 each) in  Portugal vs  Netherlands, 2006 (also known as Battle of Nuremberg)
Most sendings off (final match)
2, Pedro Monzón & Gustavo Dezotti (both  Argentina), v  West Germany, 1990
Most cautions (tournament)
345 (in 64 matches), 2006
Most cautions (all-time, team)
88 (in 64 games until 2006),  Argentina[17]
Most cautions (match, one team)
9,  Portugal, 2006, vs  Netherlands &  Netherlands, 2010, vs  Spain
Most cautions (match, both teams)
16 –  Portugal vs  Netherlands, June 25, 2006;[18] and  Cameroon v  Germany, June 11, 2002[19]
Most cautions (match, player)
3 (61', 90', 93') Josip Šimunić ( Croatia), vs  Australia, 2006 (referee: Graham Poll)[r]
Most cautions (final match, both teams)
14, 5 ( Spain) and 9 ( Netherlands) 2010[20]
Most suspensions (tournament, player)
2, André Kana-Biyik ( Cameroon 1990)[s]

Suspension[edit]

Qualifying Final Round
doping Many cases
misconduct
Fair Play Violation none

Fine[edit]

Qualifying Final Round
doping Many cases
misconduct
Fair Play Violation none none
Other none none

Other sanction[edit]

Qualifying Final Round
doping Many cases none
misconduct
  • Empty stadium, many cases
none
Fair Play Violation  Chile banned from the qualifiers for the 1994 FIFA World Cup none
Other none none

Teams: Matches played/goals scored[edit]

All time[edit]

Most matches played
109,  Germany,  Brazil
Fewest matches played
1,  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies)
Most wins
73,  Brazil
Most losses
27,  Mexico
Most draws
21,  Italy,  England
Most points
237,  Brazil
Most average points/match
2.17,  Brazil
Most matches played without a point (win or a draw)
6,  El Salvador
Most matches played without a win
9,  Honduras
Most matches played until first win
17,  Bulgaria
Most goals scored
229,  Brazil
Most goalscorers
80,  Brazil
Most goals conceded
125,  Germany
Fewest goals scored
0,  Canada,  China PR,  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies),  Trinidad and Tobago and  DR Congo (as  Zaire)
Fewest goals conceded
2,  Angola
Best goal difference
+124,  Brazil
Worst goal difference
–38,  Mexico
Most matches played without scoring a goal
3,  Canada,  China PR,  Trinidad and Tobago and  DR Congo (as  Zaire)
Most matches played always conceding a goal
6,  El Salvador
Highest average of goals scored per match
2.72,  Hungary (87 goals in 32 matches)
Lowest average of goals conceded per match
0.67,  Angola (2 goals in 3 matches)
Highest average of goals conceded per match
6,  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies)
Lowest average of goals both scored and conceded per match
1,  Angola
Highest average of goals both scored and conceded per match
6,  Indonesia (as  Dutch East Indies)
Most meetings between two teams
7 times,  Brazil vs  Sweden (1938, 1950, 1958, 1978, 1990 and twice in 1994),  Germany vs  Yugoslavia / Serbia (1954, 1958, 1962, 1974, 1990, 1998 and 2010) and  Argentina vs  Germany (1958, 1966, 1986, 1990, 2006, 2010 and 2014)
Most consecutive meetings between two teams
5 times,  Italy vs  Argentina (1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990)
Most meetings between two teams, final match
3 times,  Argentina vs  Germany (1986, 1990, 2014)
Most consecutive meetings between two teams, final match
2 times,  Argentina vs  Germany (19861990)
Most knockout wins[t]
35,  Germany
Most knockout losses[u]
14,  Germany
Most tournaments unbeaten[v]
7,  Brazil (1958, 1962, 1970, 1978, 1986, 1994, 2002)
Most tournaments eliminated without having lost a match[v]
3,  England (1982, 1990,[w] 2006)
Most tournaments eliminated without having won a match
6,  Mexico (1930, 1950, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1978) and  Bulgaria (1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1986, 1998)

In one tournament[edit]

Most wins
7,  Brazil, 2002[x]
Fewest wins, champions
3,  Uruguay, 1950 (out of 4)[y]
Most matches not won, champions
3,  Italy, 1982 (out of 7)
Most wins by non-champion (excluding third-place playoff)[z]
6,  Netherlands, 2010[aa]
Most matches not won[v]
5,  Yugoslavia, 1974;  Argentina, 1974;  West Germany, 1978;  Belgium, 1986;  Republic of Ireland, 1990;  Argentina, 1990
Most matches not won in regulation time
6,  Belgium in 1986 and  England in 1990
Most losses
3 (28 teams, of which only  Mexico has accomplished this feat at three different tournaments: 1930, 1950, and 1978)
Most losses, champions
1,  Germany, 1954 and 1974;  Argentina, 1978;  Spain, 2010
Most victories over former World Cup winning teams[v]
3,  Brazil, 1970;  Italy, 1982;  Argentina, 1986;  Germany, 2010 and 2014[ab]
Most matches against former World Cup champions and staying unbeaten[v]
4,  Argentina, 1986[ac]
Most matches between former World Cup champions[v]
7, 1970[ad]
All matches won without extra time, replays, penalty shoot-outs or playoffs
 Uruguay in 1930 (4 matches),  Brazil in 1970 (6 matches), and  Brazil in 2002 (7 matches)
Highest finish without winning a match[v]
Quarter-finals,  Republic of Ireland (1990)
Highest finish, winning at most one match[v]
Fourth,  Sweden (1938)[ae]
Most goals scored
27,  Hungary, 1954[af]
Fewest goals conceded
0,   Switzerland, 2006[af]
Most goals conceded
16,  South Korea, 1954[af]
Most matches gone into extra time
3,  Belgium, 1986;  England, 1990;  Argentina, 2014;  Croatia, 2018
Most minutes without conceding a goal
517 mins,  Italy, 1990[af]
Highest goal difference
+17,  Hungary, 1954[af]
Highest goal difference, champions
+14,  Brazil, 2002;  Germany, 2014[af]
Lowest goal difference
−16,  South Korea, 1954[af]
Lowest goal difference, champions
+6,  Italy, 1938 and 1982;  Spain, 2010[af]
Highest average of goals scored per match
5.40,  Hungary, 1954;[af]
Highest average goal difference per match
+3.2,  Hungary, 1954
Highest average goal difference per match, champions
+3.0,  Uruguay, 1930
Most goals scored, champions
25,  West Germany, 1954[af]
Fewest goals scored, champions
8,  Spain, 2010[af]
Fewest goals scored, finalists
5,  Argentina, 1990[af]
Fewest goals conceded, champions
2,  France, 1998;  Italy, 2006;  Spain, 2010[af]
Most goals conceded, champions
14,  West Germany, 1954[af]
Lowest average of goals scored per match, champions
1.14,  Spain, 2010[af]
Most unbeaten teams
5, 2006 (  Switzerland,  Argentina,  England,  France,  Italy)[v]
Fewest unbeaten teams
0, 1954
Most matches to qualify for World Cup finals
22,  Australia (2018)
Longest distance travelled in a single qualifying campaign
155,000 miles:  Australia (2018)
Most brothers in the same team in the finals
3,  Honduras (Johnny Palacios, Jerry Palacios, Wilson Palacios, 2010)[27]

Teams: Overall performance (winning percentage)[edit]

In one tournament[edit]

All time[edit]

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Uruguay (1930) 4 4 0 0 100 15 3 +12 +3.0 3.8
 Brazil (1970) 6 6 0 0 100 19 7 +12 +2.0 3.2
 Brazil (2002) 7 7 0 0 100 18 4 +14 +2.0 2.6
 Italy (1938) 4 4* 0 0 100 11 5 +6 +1.5 2.8

* one of the wins was after extra time

Worst overall performance
Because a large number of teams have had lost all their matches in a world cup, only teams with a goal difference/match <= −4.0 are included.
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 South Korea (1954) 2 0 0 2 0 0 16 −16 −8.0 0.0
 Bolivia (1950) 1 0 0 1 0 0 8 −8 −8.0 0.0
 Dutch East Indies (1938) 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 −6 −6.0 0.0
 United States (1934) 1 0 0 1 0 1 7 −6 −6.0 1.0
 Zaire (1974) 3 0 0 3 0 0 14 −14 −4.7 0.0
 Saudi Arabia (2002) 3 0 0 3 0 0 12 −12 −4.0 0.0
 Bolivia (1930) 2 0 0 2 0 0 8 −8 −4.0 0.0
 Scotland (1954) 2 0 0 2 0 0 8 −8 −4.0 0.0
 El Salvador (1982) 3 0 0 3 0 1 13 −12 −4.0 0.3
 Haiti (1974) 3 0 0 3 0 2 14 −12 −4.0 0.7

Host team[edit]

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD
 Uruguay (1930) 4 4 0 0 100 15 3 +12
Worst overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD
 Spain (1982) 5 1 2 2 20 4 5 −1

Defending champion[edit]

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Italy (1938) 4 4* 0 0 100 11 5 +6 +1.5 2.8

* one of the wins was after extra time

Worst overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 France (2002) 3 0 1 2 0 0 3 −3 −1.0 0.0

Champion[edit]

Best overall performance
see all-time best overall performance above
Worst overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Italy (1982) 7 4 3 0 57 12 6 +6 +0.9 +1.7

* one of the wins was after extra time

Non-champion[edit]

Best overall performance
Team Pld W D L Win % GF GA GD GD/M GF/M
 Italy (1990) 7 6 1 0 86 10 2 +8 +1.1 +1.4
Worst overall performance
see all-time worst overall performance above

Upsets[edit]

Teams eliminated by penalty shoot-outs are not considered as defeated.

Biggest upset in the group stage, per FIFA rankings
+74 –  South Africa (2010) ranked 83 – won 2–1 over  France (ranked 9)
Biggest upset in the knockout stage, per FIFA rankings
+34 –  South Korea (2002) ranked 40 – won 2–1 over  Italy (ranked 6)[ag]
Biggest upset of a former champion, per FIFA rankings
+74 –  South Africa (2010) ranked 83 – won 2–1 over  France (ranked 9)
Biggest upset of a defending champion, per FIFA rankings
+56 –  South Korea (2018) ranked 57 – won 2–0 over  Germany (ranked 1)
Biggest upset of a top ranked team, per FIFA rankings
+56 –  South Korea (2018) ranked 57 – won 2–0 over  Germany (ranked 1)

Continental Records

Biggest upset by an African team, per FIFA rankings
+74 –  South Africa (2010) ranked 83 – won 2–1 over  France (ranked 9)
Biggest upset by an Asian team, per FIFA rankings
+56 –  South Korea (2018) ranked 57 – won 2–0 over  Germany (ranked 1)
Biggest upset by a European team, per FIFA rankings
+29 –  Slovakia (2010) ranked 34 – won 3–2 over  Italy (ranked 5)
Biggest upset by an Oceanian team, per FIFA rankings
+24 –  Australia (2006) ranked 42 – won 3–1 over  Japan (ranked 18)
Biggest upset by a North American team, per FIFA rankings
+21 –  Costa Rica (2014) ranked 28 – won 3–1 over  Uruguay (ranked 7)
Biggest upset by a South American team, per FIFA rankings
+15 –  Ecuador (2002) ranked 36 – won 1–0 over  Croatia (ranked 21)

Hat-tricks[edit]

Most hat-tricks in a single World Cup
8, 1954
Fewest hat-tricks in a single World Cup
0, 2006

Streaks[edit]

Most consecutive successful qualification attempts[ah]
9,  Spain (1986–2018)
Most consecutive failed qualification attempts
20,  Luxembourg (19342018)
Most consecutive wins
11,  Brazil, from 2–1 Turkey (2002) to 3–0 Ghana (2006)
Most consecutive matches without a loss
13,  Brazil, from 3–0 Austria (1958) (group stage) to 2–0 Bulgaria (1966) (group stage)
Most consecutive losses
9,  Mexico, from 1–4 France (1930) to 0–3 Sweden (1958)
Most consecutive matches without a win
17,  Bulgaria, from 0–1 Argentina (1962) to 0–3 Nigeria (1994)
Most consecutive draws
5,  Belgium, from 0–0 Netherlands (1998) to 1–1 Tunisia (2002)
Most consecutive matches without a draw
16,  Portugal, from 3–1 Hungary (1966) to 1–0 Netherlands (2006)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least one goal
18,  Brazil (1930–1958) and  Germany (1934–1958)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least two goals
11,  Uruguay (1930–1954)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least three / four goals
4,  Uruguay (1930–1950) and  Hungary (1954) (four goals); also  Portugal (1966),  West Germany (1970),  Brazil (1970)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least six / eight goals
2,  Hungary (1954) (eight goals); also  Brazil (1950) (six goals)
Most consecutive matches without scoring a goal
5,  Bolivia (1930, 1950 and 1994),  Algeria (1986 and 2010), and  Honduras (1982 and 2010–2014)
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (clean sheets)
5,  Italy (1990) and   Switzerland (2006–2010)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal
559,   Switzerland (1994, 2006–2010)[28][29]
Most consecutive matches conceding at least one goal
22,   Switzerland (1934–1994)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least two goals
9,  Mexico (1930–1958)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least three goals
5,  Mexico (1930–1950)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least four goals
3,  Bolivia (1930–1950),  Mexico (1930–1950)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least five / six / seven goals
2,  South Korea (1954) (seven goals); also  United States (1930–1934) (six goals); also  Austria (1954) (five goals)

Team[edit]

Biggest margin of victory
9,  Hungary 9–0  South Korea, 1954;  Yugoslavia 9–0  Zaire, 1974 and  Hungary 10–1  El Salvador, 1982
Biggest margin of victory, qualifying match
31,  Australia 31–0  American Samoa, April 11, 2001, 2002 OFC Group 1
Most goals scored in a match, one team
10,  Hungary 10–1  El Salvador, 1982
Most goals scored in a match, both teams
12,  Austria 7–5   Switzerland, 1954
Highest scoring draw
4–4,  England vs  Belgium (a.e.t.), 1954, and  Soviet Union vs  Colombia, 1962
Largest deficit overcome in a win
3 goals,  Austria, 1954 (coming from 0–3 down to win 7–5 vs   Switzerland) and  Portugal, 1966 (coming from 0–3 down to win 5–3 vs  North Korea)
Largest deficit overcome in a draw
3 goals,  Colombia, 1962 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 4–4 vs  Soviet Union) and  Uruguay, 2002 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 3–3 vs  Senegal)
Most goals scored in extra time, both teams
5,  Italy 3–2  West Germany, 1970
Most goals scored in a final, one team
5,  Brazil, 1958
Most goals scored in a final, both teams
7,  Brazil 5–2  Sweden, 1958
Fewest goals scored in a final, both teams
0,  Brazil 0–0  Italy, 1994
Biggest margin of victory in a final
3,  Brazil 5–2  Sweden, 1958;  Brazil 4–1  Italy, 1970, and  France 3–0  Brazil, 1998
Largest deficit overcome in a win in a final
2,  West Germany, 1954 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Hungary