List of Ligue 1 winning managers

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The following is a list of association football managers who won Ligue 1 (French pronunciation: ​[liɡ œ̃], the top French professional league in the French football league system, since its establishment in 1932. Contested by 20 clubs, it operates on a system of promotion and relegation with second-tier Ligue 2. The league was inaugurated on 11 September 1932 under the name National before switching to Division 1 in 1933. The name lasted for almost seven decades before it was changed to its current name in 2002. The reigning champions are Paris Saint-Germain, who won their 8th title at the end of the 2018–19 season under the management of Thomas Tuchel.

Winning managers[edit]

Albert Batteux (1919–2003) is by far the most successful manager in the history of French club football, having won eight league and three French Cup titles coaching Reims and Saint-Étienne between 1953 and 1970.
Belgian Raymond Goethals won two titles with Marseille, in 1991 and 1992. His third consecutive title with Marseille in 1993 was later rescinded by the French Football Federation due to a match-fixing scandal.
Paul Le Guen won three consecutive titles with Lyon from 2003 to 2005 during the club's period of dominance in the 2000s.
Italy's Carlo Ancelotti won the Ligue 1 with Paris Saint-Germain in 2013. It was his third different national championship title, having previously won league titles in Italy and England.
Laurent Blanc won four league titles, with Bordeaux (2009) and Paris Saint-Germain (2014, 2015, 2016).
German coach Thomas Tuchel is the most recent manager to win Ligue 1, with Paris Saint-Germain in 2019.
Key
00 Winning manager also won Coupe de France in the same season, completing the French domestic Double.
Season Manager Club (Titles) Ref.
Name (Titles) Nationality
1932–33 (1st) Robert De Veen  BEL Olympique Lillois (1)
1933–34 (2nd) René Dedieu  FRA Sète (1)
1934–35 (3rd) Conrad Ross  URU Sochaux (1)
1935–36 (4th) Sid Kimpton  ENG RC Paris (1)
1936–37 (5th) József Eisenhoffer  HUN Marseille (1)
1937–38 (6th) Conrad Ross (2)  URU Sochaux (2)
1938–39 (7th) Jean Marmiès  FRA Sète (2)
1939–40 Championship suspended 1939–1945 due to World War II.[A]
1940–41
1941–42
1942–43
1943–44
1944–45
1945–46 (8th) Bill Berry  ENG Lille (1) [1]
1946–47 (9th) Charles Demeillez  FRA Roubaix-Tourcoing (1)
1947–48 (10th) József Zilisy  HUN Marseille (2) [1]
1948–49 (11th) Henri Roessler  FRA Reims (1) [1]
1949–50 (12th) André Gérard  FRA Bordeaux (1) [1]
1950–51 (13th) Numa Andoire  FRA Nice (1) [1]
1951–52 (14th) Numa Andoire (2)  FRA Nice (2) [1]
1952–53 (15th) Albert Batteux  FRA Reims (2) [1]
1953–54 (16th) André Cheuva  FRA Lille (2) [1]
1954–55 (17th) Albert Batteux (2)  FRA Reims (3) [1]
1955–56 (18th) Luis Carniglia  ARG Nice (3) [1]
1956–57 (19th) Jean Snella  FRA Saint-Étienne (1) [1]
1957–58 (20th) Albert Batteux (3)  FRA Reims (4) [1]
1958–59 (21st) Jean Luciano  FRA Nice (4) [1]
1959–60 (22nd) Albert Batteux (4)  FRA Reims (5) [1]
1960–61 (23rd) Lucien Leduc  FRA Monaco (1) [1]
1961–62 (24th) Albert Batteux (5)  FRA Reims (6) [1]
1962–63 (25th) Lucien Leduc (2)  FRA Monaco (2) [1]
1963–64 (26th) Jean Snella (2)  FRA Saint-Étienne (2) [1]
1964–65 (27th) José Arribas  FRA Nantes (1) [1]
1965–66 (28th) José Arribas (2)  FRA Nantes (2) [1]
1966–67 (29th) Jean Snella (3)  FRA Saint-Étienne (3) [1]
1967–68 (30th) Albert Batteux (6)  FRA Saint-Étienne (4) [1]
1968–69 (31st) Albert Batteux (7)  FRA Saint-Étienne (5) [1]
1969–70 (32nd) Albert Batteux (8)  FRA Saint-Étienne (6) [1]
1970–71 (33rd) Lucien Leduc (3)  FRA Marseille (3) [1]
1971–72 (34th) Mario Zatelli  FRA Marseille (4) [1]
1972–73 (35th) José Arribas (3)  FRA Nantes (3) [1]
1973–74 (36th) Robert Herbin  FRA Saint-Étienne (7) [1]
1974–75 (37th) Robert Herbin (2)  FRA Saint-Étienne (8) [1]
1975–76 (38th) Robert Herbin (3)  FRA Saint-Étienne (9) [1]
1976–77 (39th) Jean Vincent  FRA Nantes (4) [1]
1977–78 (40th) Lucien Leduc (4)  FRA Monaco (3) [1]
1978–79 (41st) Gilbert Gress  FRA Strasbourg (1) [1]
1979–80 (42nd) Jean Vincent (2)  FRA Nantes (5) [1]
1980–81 (43rd) Robert Herbin (4)  FRA Saint-Étienne (10) [1]
1981–82 (44th) Gérard Banide  FRA Monaco (4) [1]
1982–83 (45th) Jean-Claude Suaudeau  FRA Nantes (6) [1]
1983–84 (46th) Aimé Jacquet  FRA Bordeaux (2) [1]
1984–85 (47th) Aimé Jacquet (2)  FRA Bordeaux (3) [1]
1985–86 (48th) Gérard Houllier  FRA Paris Saint-Germain (1) [1]
1986–87 (49th) Aimé Jacquet (3)  FRA Bordeaux (4) [1]
1987–88 (50th) Arsène Wenger  FRA Monaco (5) [1]
1988–89 (51st) Gérard Gili  FRA Marseille (5)
1989–90 (52nd) Gérard Gili (2)  FRA Marseille (6) [1]
1990–91 (53rd) Raymond Goethals  BEL Marseille (7)
1991–92 (54th) Raymond Goethals (2)  BEL Marseille (8)
1992–93 (55th) Title rescinded due to bribery scandal.[B]
1993–94 (56th) Artur Jorge  POR Paris Saint-Germain (2) [1]
1994–95 (57th) Jean-Claude Suaudeau (2)  FRA Nantes (7) [1]
1995–96 (58th) Guy Roux  FRA Auxerre (1) [1]
1996–97 (59th) Jean Tigana  FRA Monaco (6) [1]
1997–98 (60th) Daniel Leclercq  FRA Lens (1) [1]
1998–99 (61st) Élie Baup  FRA Bordeaux (5) [1]
1999–2000 (62nd) Claude Puel  FRA Monaco (7) [1]
2000–01 (63rd) Raynald Denoueix  FRA Nantes (8) [1]
2001–02 (64th) Jacques Santini  FRA Lyon (1) [1]
2002–03 (65th) Paul Le Guen  FRA Lyon (2) [1]
2003–04 (66th) Paul Le Guen (2)  FRA Lyon (3) [1]
2004–05 (67th) Paul Le Guen (3)  FRA Lyon (4) [1]
2005–06 (68th) Gérard Houllier (2)  FRA Lyon (5) [1]
2006–07 (69th) Gérard Houllier (3)  FRA Lyon (6) [1]
2007–08 (70th) Alain Perrin  FRA Lyon (7) [1]
2008–09 (71st) Laurent Blanc  FRA Bordeaux (6) [1]
2009–10 (72nd) Didier Deschamps  FRA Marseille (9) [1]
2010–11 (73rd) Rudi Garcia  FRA Lille (3) [1]
2011–12 (74th) René Girard  FRA Montpellier (1) [1]
2012–13 (75th) Carlo Ancelotti  ITA Paris Saint-Germain (3) [1]
2013–14 (76th) Laurent Blanc (2)  FRA Paris Saint-Germain (4) [1]
2014–15 (77th) Laurent Blanc (3)  FRA Paris Saint-Germain (5) [1]
2015–16 (78th) Laurent Blanc (4)  FRA Paris Saint-Germain (6) [1]
2016–17 (79th) Leonardo Jardim  POR Monaco (8) [1]
2017–18 (80th) Unai Emery  ESP Paris Saint-Germain (7) [1]
2018–19 (81st) Thomas Tuchel  GER Paris Saint-Germain (8) [1]

Multiple winners[edit]

† denotes managers active in French football, as of May 2015.

Rank Manager Titles Club(s) Winning years
1st
France Albert Batteux
8
Reims (5), Saint-Étienne (3) 1953, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1968, 1969, 1970
2nd
France Lucien Leduc
4
Monaco (3), Marseille (1) 1961, 1963, 1971, 1978
France Robert Herbin
4
Saint-Étienne (4) 1974, 1975, 1976, 1981
France Laurent Blanc
4
Bordeaux (1), Paris Saint-Germain (3) 2009, 2014, 2015, 2016
5th
France Jean Snella
3
Saint-Étienne (3) 1957, 1964, 1967
France José Arribas
3
Nantes (3) 1965, 1966, 1973
France Aimé Jacquet
3
Bordeaux (3) 1984, 1985, 1987
France Gérard Houllier
3
Paris Saint-Germain (1), Lyon (2) 1986, 2006, 2007
France Paul Le Guen
3
Lyon (3) 2003, 2004, 2005
10th
Uruguay Conrad Ross
2
Sochaux (2) 1935, 1938
France Numa Andoire
2
Nice (2) 1951, 1952
France Jean Vincent
2
Nantes (2) 1977, 1980
France Gérard Gili
2
Marseille (2) 1989, 1990
Belgium Raymond Goethals
2
Marseille (2) 1991, 1992
France Jean-Claude Suaudeau
2
Nantes (2) 1983, 1995

By nationality[edit]

Country Managers Titles
 France 35 65
 Belgium 2 3
 England 2 2
 Hungary 2 2
 Portugal 2 2
 Uruguay 1 2
 Argentina 1 1
 Italy 1 1
 Spain 1 1
 Germany 1 1
Total 48 80

Notes[edit]

A. ^ During World War II, competitive football was suspended by the French government, although football clubs continued playing in regional competitions. During these so-called "war championships", professionalism was abolished by the Vichy regime and clubs were forced to participate in regional leagues, designated Zone Sud (South Zone) and Zone Nord (North Zone). The Ligue de Football Professionnel (LFP) and the French Football Federation (FFF) do not recognise these championships played between 1939 and 1945.
B. ^ The 1992–93 season was originally won by Marseille, under the management of Jean Fernandez (August–November 1992) and Raymond Goethals (November 1992 – June 1993). The title was originally attributed to Goethals' as his third consecutive title with the club. However, in September 1993 the French Football Federation rescinded Marseille's championship title due to a match fixing scandal in which Marseille had allegedly offered bribes to several Valenciennes players so that they would lose their home fixture against Marseille played in May 1993. Although Paris Saint-Germain managed by Artur Jorge had finished the season as runners-up, with four points behind Marseille, the title eventually remained unattributed by the FFF and no winner was ever declared for the 1992–93 season.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq "Palmarès Championnat de France". lequipe.fr. L'Équipe. Retrieved 24 May 2017.