List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career rebounding leaders

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In basketball, a rebound is the act of gaining possession of the ball after a missed field goal or free throw. The National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Division I's top 25 highest rebounders in men's basketball history are listed below. The NCAA did not split into its current divisions format until August 1973.[1] From 1906 to 1955, there were no classifications to the NCAA nor its predecessor, the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS).[1] Then, from 1956 to spring 1973, colleges were classified as either "NCAA University Division (Major College)" or "NCAA College Division (Small College)".[1][2]

College basketball's all-time leading rebounder is Tom Gola of La Salle. He recorded 2,201 rebounds (while also amassing 2,462 points) between 1951–52 and 1954–55. Gola is also one of seven players in the top 25 who have been enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.[3] The others are Bill Russell,[4] Elvin Hayes,[5] Elgin Baylor,[6] Dave DeBusschere,[7] Wes Unseld[8] and Ralph Sampson.[9] Robert Parish of Centenary, also a Hall of Famer,[10] grabbed 1,820 rebounds which would have placed him fifth all-time.[11] However, due to sanctions related to Parish's recruitment, the NCAA omitted all Centenary games and statistics from its official records starting with his freshman year of 1972–73 and continuing through the 1977–78 season, two years after Parish's graduation.[12]

Three teams (Louisville, Wake Forest and Morehead State) each have two players in the top 25 all-time rebounding list. For Louisville, they are Charlie Tyra and Wes Unseld; for Wake Forest they are Dickie Hemric and Tim Duncan; and for Morehead State, they are Steve Hamilton and Kenneth Faried. Only one player, Elgin Baylor, split his college career at two different schools. He spent one season at Albertson College before transferring to Seattle University where he spent the next two years.

Key[edit]

Rebounding leaders[edit]

All-time[edit]

Bill Russell grabbed 1,606 rebounds.
Elvin Hayes grabbed 1,602 rebounds.
Malik Rose grabbed 1,514 rebounds.
Player Pos. Team Career start Career end Games
played
Rebounds Ref.
Tom Gola* F La Salle 1951 1955 118 2,201 [13]
Joe Holup F George Washington 1952 1956 104 2,030 [13]
Charlie Slack C Marshall 1952 1956 88 1,916 [14]
Ed Conlin F Fordham 1951 1955 102 1,884 [14]
Robert Parish* C Centenary 1972 1976 108 1,820 [15]
Dickie Hemric F/C Wake Forest 1951 1955 104 1,802 [16]
Paul Silas C Creighton 1961 1964 81 1,751 [17]
Art Quimby C Connecticut 1951 1955 80 1,716 [2]
Jerry Harper F/C Alabama 1952 1956 93 1,688 [18]
Jeff Cohen F/C William & Mary 1957 1961 103 1,679 [14]
Steve Hamilton F/C Morehead State 1954 1958 102 1,675 [14]
Kenneth Faried F/C Morehead State (2) 2007 2011 136 1,673 [19]
Charlie Tyra F Louisville 1953 1957 95 1,617 [20]
Bill Russell* C San Francisco 1953 1956 79 1,606 [21]
Elvin Hayes* C Houston 1965 1968 93 1,602 [22]
Marvin Barnes F Providence 1971 1974 89 1,592 [23]
Tim Duncan C Wake Forest (2) 1993 1997 128 1,570 [24]
Ronnie Shavlik F/C NC State 1953 1956 93 1,567 [2]
Elgin Baylor* F Albertson / Seattle 1955 1958 80 1,559 [25]
Ernie Beck F Penn 1950 1953 82 1,557 [14]
Dave DeBusschere* C Detroit 1959 1962 80 1,552 [26]
Wes Unseld* F/C Louisville (2) 1965 1968 82 1,551 [27]
Derrick Coleman F/C Syracuse 1986 1990 143 1,537 [28]
Malik Rose F Drexel 1992 1996 120 1,514 [29]
Ralph Sampson* C Virginia 1979 1983 132 1,511 [30]
Chris Smith C Virginia Tech 1957 1961 88 1,508 [2]

Post-1973 era[edit]

In the official NCAA men's basketball record book, a distinction is drawn between the pre-1973 era and the post-1973 era.[2] One reason is that because of the split into the three Divisions in use today (Divisions I, II and III), many of the rebounds accumulated in the pre-1973 era were against lesser-talented opponents that would be considered Division II, III or even NAIA in today's classification scheme. Although the 1972–73 season was before the divisional split, the NCAA officially considers that season to be "post-1973" because of the adoption of freshman eligibility for varsity play in all NCAA sports effective in August 1972.[2] Listed below are the top 10 rebounders in NCAA Division I basketball since 1973.

Kenneth Faried is the all-time leading rebounder in the post-1973 era.
Player Pos. Team Career start Career end Games
played
Rebounds Ref.
Kenneth Faried F/C Morehead State 2007 2011 136 1,673 [19]
Tim Duncan C Wake Forest 1993 1997 128 1,570 [24]
Derrick Coleman F/C Syracuse 1986 1990 143 1,537 [28]
Malik Rose F Drexel 1992 1996 120 1,514 [29]
Ralph Sampson* C Virginia 1979 1983 132 1,511 [30]
Pete Padgett F Nevada 1972 1976 104 1,464 [31]
Ángel Delgado C Seton Hall 2014 2018 132 1,455 [32]
Shawn Long C Louisiana–Lafayette 2012 2016 135 1,447 [33]
Lionel Simmons F La Salle 1986 1990 131 1,429 [34]
Anthony Bonner F/C Saint Louis 1986 1990 133 1,424 [35]

References[edit]

General
  • "2018–19 NCAA Men's Basketball Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2018. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
Specific
  1. ^ a b c "History of the NCAA". NCAA.org. National Collegiate Athletic Association. Archived from the original on September 24, 2010. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "2009–10 NCAA Men's Basketball Records" (PDF). 2009–10 NCAA Men's Basketball Media Guide. National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2009. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  3. ^ "Thomas J. "Tom" Gola". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on August 31, 2009. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  4. ^ "William F. "Bill" Russell". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on June 3, 2011. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  5. ^ "Elvin E. Hayes". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on September 12, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  6. ^ "Elgin Baylor". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on February 15, 2011. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  7. ^ "David A. "Dave" DeBusschere". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on September 12, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  8. ^ "Westley S. "Wes" Unseld". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  9. ^ "Ralph Sampson named to Basketball Hall of Fame". NBA.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. April 2, 2012. Retrieved July 20, 2012.
  10. ^ "Robert L. Parish". hoophall.com. Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  11. ^ "Robert Parish". 2009-10 Centenary Gents Basketball Media Guide. Centenary Sports Information. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 11, 2011. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  12. ^ Moses, Sam (December 8, 1975). "Invisible In The Post". Sports Illustrated. p. 1. Archived from the original on February 4, 2009. Retrieved August 9, 2010. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  13. ^ a b "La Salle Explorers: History and Tradition". lasalle-explorers.com. Clear Stage Sports. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  14. ^ a b c d e "All-time Rebound Leaders". Hickok Sports. Archived from the original on June 29, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  15. ^ "Robert Parish". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  16. ^ "Looking Back... Dickie Hemric's Record-Setting Career". theACC.com. Atlantic Coast Conference. Archived from the original on March 22, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  17. ^ "Paul Silas". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  18. ^ "Jerry Harper – Class of 2001". ashof.org. Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  19. ^ a b "Kenneth Faried Stats". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved February 12, 2010.
  20. ^ "Player Bio: Charlie Tyra". uoflsports.com. University of Louisville. Archived from the original on March 18, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  21. ^ "Bill Russell". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  22. ^ "Elvin Hayes". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  23. ^ "Marvin Barnes". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  24. ^ a b "Tim Duncan". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  25. ^ "Elgin Baylor". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  26. ^ "Dave DeBusschere". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  27. ^ "Wes Unseld". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  28. ^ a b "Derrick Coleman". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  29. ^ a b "Malik Rose". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  30. ^ a b "Ralph Sampson". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  31. ^ "Coach Profile: Pete Padgett". ucsbgauchos.cstv.com. University of California at Santa Barbara. Archived from the original on November 30, 2010. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  32. ^ "Angel Delgado". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  33. ^ "Shawn Long". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  34. ^ "Lionel Simmons". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  35. ^ "Anthony Bonner". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2010.