List of political parties in Bhutan

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Bhutan

In Bhutan, political parties need to be registered with Election Commission to contest National Assembly elections. Political parties can only contest National Assembly elections, since being an independent is a requirement for contesting National Council and local government elections.

Besides the official registered parties that came came into existence after the democratisation of Bhutan, many Bhutanese parties have been operating in exile since the 1990s. Most of these parties are run by exiled people from the Lhotshampa community from the refugee camps in Nepal.[1]

Official parties[edit]

In Bhutan, political parties need to be registered with Election Commission of Bhutan to participate in the Bhutanese elections.[2]

Active parties[edit]

Party Registered Assemblymen
People's Democratic Party (PDP) 1 September 2007 (2007-09-01) 0
Druk Phuensum Tshogpa (DPT) 2 October 2007 (2007-10-02) 17 (36.17%)
Bhutan Kuen-Nyam Party (BKP) 2013 0
Druk Nyamrup Tshogpa (DNT) 2013 30 (63.83%)

Deregistered parties[edit]

In 2018, Druk Chirwang Tshogpa was deregistered by the Election Commission on its own request.[3]

Other political parties[edit]

The following parties are all based in exile.

The Druk National Congress was formed in exile in Kathmandu, Nepal on June 16, 1994.[citation needed]

On August 26, 2010, Bhutanese political parties in exile formed an umbrella group to pursue a "unified democratic movement led by Rongthong Kunley Dorji, President of the Druk National Congress. The group's offices opened in Kathmandu in November 2010, and it seems to receive some measure of support from the Nepalese government.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ P Rizal, Dhurba (2015). The royal semi-authoritarian democracy of Bhutan. Lexington Books. ISBN 9781498507479. OCLC 906010256.
  2. ^ "Election Act of the Kingdom of Bhutan 2008" (PDF). Government of Bhutan. 2008-07-28. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2018-09-21. Retrieved 2019-05-22.
  3. ^ Subba, MB (2018-02-27). "Druk Chirwang Tshogpa deregistered". Kuensel. Archived from the original on 2019-04-10. Retrieved 2019-05-22.
  4. ^ Chandrasekharan, S. (2010-12-08). "BHUTAN: Political Parties in Exile Form an Umbrella Organisation: Update No. 88". South Asia Analysis Group (SAAG). Archived from the original on 2011-07-28. Retrieved 2011-05-20.

External links[edit]