Listed buildings in Littleborough, Greater Manchester

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Littleborough is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England, and it is unparished. The town, its suburbs of Calderbrook and Smithy Bridge, and the surrounding countryside contain 79 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, five are listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is largely rural, and most of the listed buildings are houses and associated structures, farmhouses, and farm buildings. Following the Industrial Revolution textile mills were built, some of which remain and are listed. The Rochdale Canal passes through the area and bridges and locks associated with it are listed. Also passing through the area was the Manchester and Leeds Railway, and structures associated with it are listed. The other listed buildings include churches, public houses, a former toll house, a bandstand, a drinking fountain, and two war memorials.


Key[edit]

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Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Stubley Old Hall
53°38′28″N 2°06′38″W / 53.64107°N 2.11061°W / 53.64107; -2.11061 (Stubley Old Hall)
15th century (possible) An H-shaped house with a hall and cross-wings. The south wing is the oldest, and is cruck-framed. The hall and north wing are timber framed, the front was encased in stone in about 1660, and the rest later in brick. The hall is open to the roof, and the wings have two storeys. The house is on a projecting plinth and has quoins and a stone-slate roof. The doorway has a chamfered surround and an obtuse-angled lintel, and the windows are mullioned and transomed or mullioned, some with hood moulds.[2][3] II*
Shore Hall
53°39′05″N 2°07′05″W / 53.65148°N 2.11813°W / 53.65148; -2.11813 (Shore Hall)
Shore Hall, Littleborough.jpg
1605 The house has a T-shaped plan with a main range and a cross-wing on the right. It is in stone on a projecting plinth, with quoins and moulded eaves brackets. There are two storeys, five bays, and an outshut at the rear of the cross-wing. The roof is in stone-slate, the left gable is coped with a ball finial, and the cross-wing has a hipped roof. The doorway has a chamfered surround and a Tudor arched lintel, and the windows are mullioned with hood moulds.[2][4] II*
Windy Bank
53°38′47″N 2°05′07″W / 53.64636°N 2.08530°W / 53.64636; -2.08530 (Windy Bank)
Windy Bank, Blackstone Edge.JPG
1611 The house is basically timber framed and is encased in gritstone on a projecting plinth, with quoins, gargoyles, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables and finials. It has an L-shaped plan with a main range, and a rear wing which is the earliest part. There are two storeys, and the main range has four bays and three gables. The windows are mullioned with hood moulds.[5][6] II*
Dearnley Old Hall
53°38′20″N 2°07′09″W / 53.63882°N 2.11923°W / 53.63882; -2.11923 (Dearnley Old Hall)
Dearnley Old Hall-geograph.org.uk-4522201.jpg Early to mid 17th century (probable) A house in rendered stone on a projecting plinth that has a stone-slate roof with coped gables. There are two storeys, three bays, and a parallel range at the rear. The paired doors have chamfered surrounds and flat-arched lintels, and the windows are mullioned with hood moulds. Inside is a timber framed partition.[2][7] II*
Barn and shippon east of Old Bent Farmhouse
53°38′58″N 2°04′56″W / 53.64946°N 2.08221°W / 53.64946; -2.08221 (Barn and shippon east of Old Bent Farmhouse)
1668 The building is in stone with quoins, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. It is a long building, with an outshut on the front, and lean-to extensions to the right and rear. The barn contains two cart entries, two winnowing doors, windows and doorways, one with a dated and initialled lintel.[8] II
Higher Windy Bank Farmhouse and barn
53°38′44″N 2°05′03″W / 53.64544°N 2.08430°W / 53.64544; -2.08430 (Higher Windy Bank Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The farmhouse was altered in the 18th century, and the barn added to the right in the 19th century. The house is on a projecting plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, and a right outshut. The house has a central porch, a moulded doorway with an obtuse-angled lintel, and a coped parapet, and the windows are mullioned. In the barn is a round-headed cart entry, a segmental-headed shippon door, and other doors and windows.[9] II
Former farmhouse west of Whittaker Farmhouse
53°38′12″N 2°04′53″W / 53.63654°N 2.08143°W / 53.63654; -2.08143 (Former farmhouse west of Whittaker Farmhouse)
Last quarter of 17th century The farmhouse was extended in the mid 18th century, a parallel range was added at the rear in the late 18th century, and it has since been used for other purposes. The building is in stone on a projecting plinth with quoins, and has a stone-slate roof with coped gables. There are two storeys and five bays. On the front is a gabled porch, and the windows are mullioned.[10] II
The Rake Inn
53°38′45″N 2°05′11″W / 53.64576°N 2.08639°W / 53.64576; -2.08639 (The Rake Inn)
Former Rake Inn, Littleborough.jpg
1690 The public house has been altered and extended. It is in stone, partly rendered, with quoins, a slate roof with coped gables, and a T-shaped plan. There are two storeys and four bays, with a cross-wing on the right. On the front is a gabled porch and mullioned windows in the first three bays, and in the gable end of the cross-wing is a canted bay window. The windows in the ground floor have hood moulds.[11] II
Castle Farmhouse and barn
53°39′21″N 2°03′36″W / 53.65576°N 2.06006°W / 53.65576; -2.06006 (Castle Farmhouse)
1691 A combined farmhouse and barn dating mainly from the 18th century. It is in stone with quoins and a slate roof. There are two storeys and three bays, with the barn to the left. The doorway has a square-cut surround, there is a 20th-century porch in the third bay, and most of the windows are mullioned, with some replaced windows.[12] II
Old Bent House and Farmhouse
53°38′58″N 2°04′58″W / 53.64955°N 2.08268°W / 53.64955; -2.08268 (Old Bent House and Farmhouse)
1691 The house was enlarged in the 19th and 20th centuries. It is in stone on a projecting plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. There is a double-depth plan, two storeys, four bays, and an 18th-century single-storey extension at the rear right. The single-storey porch has a doorway with a moulded surround, a segmental-arched lintel with enriched spandrels and inscribed initials and date, and a parapet. The windows on the front are mullioned with hood moulds, and on the sides and rear are mullioned and sash windows. There is a later porch to the rear.[13][14] II*
Barn, Mowrode Farm
53°39′43″N 2°05′06″W / 53.66188°N 2.08494°W / 53.66188; -2.08494 (Barn, Mowrode Farm)
1708 The barn is in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. It contains opposed cart entries, a blocked barn door with a dressed surround and a massive lintel, shippon doors with chamfered surrounds and elliptical heads, and lean-to extensions at the rear.[15] II
Long Clough Farmhouse
53°39′27″N 2°06′28″W / 53.65741°N 2.10787°W / 53.65741; -2.10787 (Long Clough Farmhouse)
1725 A stone farmhouse with quoins and a 20th-century tiled roof with coped gables. It has a single-depth plan, two storeys and three bays. There are two doorways, one with a chamfered surround and a dated and initialled lintel, and the other with a square-cut surround. The windows are mullioned.[16] II
1 Ealees
53°38′37″N 2°05′22″W / 53.64357°N 2.08950°W / 53.64357; -2.08950 (1 Ealees)
Early 18th century A stone house with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, and a small 20th-century lean-to extension. In the centre is a porch, and the windows are mullioned with some mullions missing. In the gable end is a blocked doorway.[17] II
Lightowlers Cottage
53°39′07″N 2°04′46″W / 53.65184°N 2.07955°W / 53.65184; -2.07955 (Lightowlers Cottage)
Early 18th century A stone house incorporating earlier material, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, three bays, a lean-to extension to the right, and a later left wing. On the front is a gabled porch, and the windows are mullioned.[18] II
Humber Farmhouse and barn
53°38′42″N 2°04′43″W / 53.64493°N 2.07858°W / 53.64493; -2.07858 (Humber Farmhouse)
Early 18th century The barn is the older, the farmhouse dating from the mid 18th century. The house is on a projecting plinth, with quoins, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. It has a single-depth plan, two storeys and two bays. There is a central porch wing, a doorway with a chamfered surround, and the windows are mullioned. The barn to the right contains opposing cart entries, a shippon door, a lean-to extension and a wing at the rear.[19] II
Former winter bee-house, Pike Barns
53°38′59″N 2°04′49″W / 53.64976°N 2.08038°W / 53.64976; -2.08038 (Former winter bee-house, Pike Barns)
Early 18th century The bee-house is in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. It consists of single room approached by external steps above an undercroft. It has a doorway with a chamfered surround, a hatch, and a casement window. Inside are two tiers of bee boles.[20] II
Rough Farmhouse
53°38′41″N 2°04′09″W / 53.64459°N 2.06922°W / 53.64459; -2.06922 (Rough Farmhouse)
Early 18th century The farmhouse was at one time used as a toll house. It is in stone on a projecting plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. The house has a single-depth plan, two storeys, two bays, and a barn to the left with lean-to extensions. The windows in the house are mullioned, and in the barn is a cart entry.[21] II
Hollingworth Fold
53°37′50″N 2°05′17″W / 53.63049°N 2.08803°W / 53.63049; -2.08803 (Hollingworth Fold)
1727 A stone house on a projecting plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, and a rear outshut. In the centre is a doorway, and most of the windows are mullioned. In the right gable end is a doorway and an inserted sash window.[22] II
Stone post, Old Bent House
53°38′58″N 2°04′58″W / 53.64941°N 2.08281°W / 53.64941; -2.08281 (Stone post, Old Bent House)
1745 The stone post, possibly originally a sundial, consists of a square shaft with corner beads, surmounted by a rectangular dated stone.[23] II
Barn and shippon southeast of Old Bent Farmhouse
53°38′58″N 2°04′56″W / 53.64938°N 2.08234°W / 53.64938; -2.08234 (Barn and shippon southeast of Old Bent Farmhouse)
1750 The building is in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. It has a large central doorway with a chamfered surround, a datestone above, and windows on each side. There are owl holes in both gables, and a window and loft hatch at the rear.[24] II
4 and 5 Sladen Fold
53°39′26″N 2°04′44″W / 53.65734°N 2.07900°W / 53.65734; -2.07900 (4 and 5 Sladen Fold)
Mid 18th century A stone house with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, three bays, and a two-storey rear wing. On the front are two porches, and most of the windows are mullioned.[25] II
Lower Shore Farmhouse
53°38′56″N 2°06′52″W / 53.64897°N 2.11451°W / 53.64897; -2.11451 (Lower Shore Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century A farmhouse, later a private house, in stone on a projecting plinth, with a roof partly in slate and partly in stone-slate. There are two storeys, three bays, and later extensions to the rear and to the right. The central doorway has an architrave and a hood, and most of the windows are mullioned. In the right extension are quoins and casement windows.[26] II
Lydgate Cottage
53°38′41″N 2°04′22″W / 53.64486°N 2.07271°W / 53.64486; -2.07271 (Lydgate Cottage)
Mid 18th century A house, at one time cottages, in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, a single-bay extension to the left, and a later porch. The porch is gabled with two storeys, the doors have square-cut surrounds, and the windows are mullioned.[27] II
Sladen Fold Farmhouse
53°39′26″N 2°04′44″W / 53.65726°N 2.07876°W / 53.65726; -2.07876 (Sladen Fold Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century A stone house that has a stone-slate roof with coped gables. There are two storeys, two bays, and a rear outshut. On the front is a porch, and the windows are mullioned.[28] II
Sundial
53°39′05″N 2°07′05″W / 53.65128°N 2.11795°W / 53.65128; -2.11795 (Sundial)
18th century The sundial shaft is in the garden of Higher Shore Hall. It is in stone and consists of a square baluster with a moulded head. The dial and gnomon are missing.[29] II
Town House Mill
53°39′03″N 2°05′49″W / 53.65090°N 2.09703°W / 53.65090; -2.09703 (Town House Mill)
1752 Formerly a wool warehouse, later used for other purposes, it is in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are three storeys and six bays, the fourth to sixth bays projecting forward. The windows are mullioned, in bays one and three are doorways with square-cut surrounds, and in bay two is a blocked taking-in door. Bay five has a doorway and above are taking-in doors, all with segmental heads and keystoness.[a][30] II
2–7 Calderbrook Road
53°39′36″N 2°05′23″W / 53.65991°N 2.08973°W / 53.65991; -2.08973 (2–7 Calderbrook Road)
Mid to late 18th century A terrace of five stone houses with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have a single-depth plan, two storeys, one bay each, and rear extensions. The doorways have square-cut surrounds, and the windows are mullioned.[31] II
Whitfield Farmhouse
53°39′21″N 2°05′21″W / 53.65571°N 2.08913°W / 53.65571; -2.08913 (Whitfield Farmhouse)
Mid to late 18th century The farmhouse incorporates earlier material, and is in stone on a projecting plinth, with quoins and a 20th-century tiled roof. There are four bays, the first bay projects slightly and has a single storey, and the other bays have three storeys. In the centre are double doors, one blocked, and the windows are mullioned, one with a hood mould.[32] II
1 and 2 Far Hey Head and barn
53°39′35″N 2°06′05″W / 53.65970°N 2.10147°W / 53.65970; -2.10147 (1 and 2 Far Hey Head)
Late 18th century A pair of houses and a barn to the left, the last dating from the 19th century, in stone with slate roofs. The houses have three storeys, one bay each, a lean-to extension to the front left with a stone-slate roof, a small right wing, and a lean-to extension at the rear. The windows are mullioned, some of them former workshop windows. The barn has quoins, and a blocked round-headed cart entry.[33] II
5 Old Road
53°38′48″N 2°04′50″W / 53.64669°N 2.08044°W / 53.64669; -2.08044 (5 Old Road)
Late 18th century A stone house with a stone-slate roof, two storeys, two bays, and a rear outshut. The doorway has a square-cut surround, and the windows are mullioned. To the left of each bay is a full-height stone post with fixing lugs, and at the rear is a 20th-century window, a door and a dormer window.[34] II
Booth Hollings Mill
53°37′19″N 2°04′28″W / 53.62187°N 2.07450°W / 53.62187; -2.07450 (Booth Hollings Mill)
Booth Hollins Mill.jpg
Late 18th century A rear wing was added to the former textile mill in the 19th century, forming an L-shaped plan. The mill is in stone with a slate roof. The original range has two storeys and contained a water wheel. It has a segmental-arched entry, now blocked, two doorways, five windows in the ground floor, and a full-length mullioned window in the upper floor. The wing has eight bays, it incorporates an engine house and a boiler room, and has a square chimney.[35] II
New Nook
53°37′26″N 2°03′54″W / 53.62389°N 2.06499°W / 53.62389; -2.06499 (New Nook)
Late 18th century Originally three houses, later used for other purposes, they are in stone with a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, two storeys, and each former house has one bay. The doorways are on the right, the windows are mullioned, and there are taking-in doors at the rear.[36] II
Whitfield Cottage
53°39′21″N 2°05′20″W / 53.65571°N 2.08894°W / 53.65571; -2.08894 (Whitfield Cottage)
Late 18th century A stone house with quoins and a slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, a right lean-to extension, and central double doorways with square-cut surrounds, one of which is blocked. Some windows are mullioned, and others have been altered.[37] II
Lock No. 39
53°39′41″N 2°04′55″W / 53.66125°N 2.08193°W / 53.66125; -2.08193 (Lock No. 39)
Lock No. 39, Rochdale Canal.jpg
Between 1794 and 1798 The lock on the Rochdale Canal is in stone and has double upper gates. At the lower end are retaining walls containing boatman's steps.[38] II
Lock No. 45 and Pikehouse Bridge
53°39′11″N 2°04′58″W / 53.65304°N 2.08266°W / 53.65304; -2.08266 (Lock No. 45 and Pikehouse Bridge)
Pikehouse Lock, Littleborough.jpg
Between 1794 and 1798 The lock on the Rochdale Canal is in stone and has double upper gates. At the south is a tailgate in stone that has a single segmental arch. The bridge has a band, a parapet with rounded copings, and square end piers.[39] II
Lock No. 46 and Windy Bank Bridge
53°39′11″N 2°04′58″W / 53.65304°N 2.08266°W / 53.65304; -2.08266 (Lock No. 46 and Windy Bank Bridge)
Bent House Lock - geograph.org.uk - 404726.jpg
Between 1794 and 1798 The lock on the Rochdale Canal is in stone and has double upper gates. At the south is a tailgate in stone that has a single elliptical arch. The bridge has a band and a parapet consisting of large vertically-set stones.[40] II
Benthouse Bridge
53°39′01″N 2°05′04″W / 53.65017°N 2.08435°W / 53.65017; -2.08435 (Benthouse Bridge)
Benthouse Bridge, Littleborough.jpg
Between 1794 and 1798 This is bridge No. 46, an accommodation bridge over the Rochdale Canal. It is in stone, and has a single elliptical arch, with a hump-back, rusticated voussoirs, keystones, a band, a parapet with rounded copings, and square end piers.[41] II
Eales Road Bridge
53°38′38″N 2°05′26″W / 53.64378°N 2.09062°W / 53.64378; -2.09062 (Eales Road Bridge)
Eales Road Bridge, Littleborough.jpg
Between 1794 and 1798 This is bridge No. 49, carrying Eales Road over the Rochdale Canal. It is in stone, and has a single elliptical arch, with rusticated voussoirs, keystones, a band, a parapet with rounded copings, and square end piers.[42] II
Lodge Bridge
53°38′07″N 2°06′33″W / 53.63538°N 2.10905°W / 53.63538; -2.10905 (Lodge Bridge)
Lodge Bridge, Rochdale Canal, Littleborough - geograph.org.uk - 840552.jpg
Between 1794 and 1798 A road bridge, later a footbridge, crossing the Rochdale Canal. It is in stone, and has a single elliptical arch, with a hump-back, rusticated voussoirs, keystones, a band, a parapet with rounded copings, and square end piers.[43] II
Freshwater Cottage
53°37′35″N 2°05′10″W / 53.62647°N 2.08600°W / 53.62647; -2.08600 (Freshwater Cottage)
1790s Originally three cottages, later one house, it is in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. The doorways have square-cut surrounds, and most of the windows are mullioned, with workshop windows in the upper floor. At the rear is a blocked taking-in door.[44] II
Town House
53°39′02″N 2°05′48″W / 53.65065°N 2.09658°W / 53.65065; -2.09658 (Town House)
1798 The house was extended at the rear in 1915. It is in ashlar stone on a projecting plinth with a band, an eaves cornice and a slate roof. The house has two storeys, a symmetrical front of five bays, the middle three bays projecting forward under a pediment with a circular window in the tympanum. The central doorway has three-quarter columns, a radial fanlight, an archivolt with a keystone, and an open pediment. The windows are sashes, and in the left return is a stair window with a moulded surround, and at the rear is a two-storey bow window.[2][45] II
Barn west of Shore Hall
53°39′05″N 2°07′07″W / 53.65148°N 2.11855°W / 53.65148; -2.11855 (Barn west of Shore Hall)
c. 1800 The barn is in stone with quoins, shaped eaves gutter brackets, a stone-slate roof, and a later rear outshut. It contains opposing segmental-headed cart entries, doors and circular openings. On the right gable end is a Venetian window with a keystone, above which is a doorway with a square-cut surround and a fanlight, and an owl hole.[46] II
1 and 3 Whittaker Fold
53°38′12″N 2°04′52″W / 53.63663°N 2.08124°W / 53.63663; -2.08124 (1 and 3 Whittaker Fold)
Late 18th to early 19th century A pair of stone houses with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys, and one bay each, with a lean-to extension on the left. The doorway has a square-cut surround, and the windows are mullioned.[47] II
Coach House Heritage Centre
53°38′39″N 2°05′43″W / 53.64423°N 2.09525°W / 53.64423; -2.09525 (Coach House Heritage Centre)
Late 18th to early 19th century Originally a coach house, later used as a heritage centre, the building is in stone with quoins, shaped eaves brackets, and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys and four bays. In the first bay are opposed segmental-headed coach entries, above which on the front is a small round-headed window with impost blocks and a keystone. To the right are three doorways with chamfered surrounds. In the left return is a Venetian window, and in the right return is a coach entry. The gables both have an oval-shaped opening and an owl hole.[48] II
1 and 3 Salley Street
53°39′48″N 2°05′12″W / 53.66347°N 2.08666°W / 53.66347; -2.08666 (1 and 3 Salley Street)
1801 A pair of stone houses with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, two storeys, one bay each, and the doorways have square-cut surrounds. The windows were originally mullioned, some mullions have been removed, and some windows have been altered.[49] II
Holy Trinity Church
53°38′39″N 2°05′38″W / 53.64424°N 2.09396°W / 53.64424; -2.09396 (Holy Trinity Church)
Holy Trinity Parish Church, Littleborough - geograph.org.uk - 1272010.jpg
1818–20 The church, replacing an earlier church on the site, was designed by Thomas Taylor, and the chancel was added in 1889 by J. S. Crowther. It is in stone with a slate roof, and consists of a nave on a plinth, with gargoyles and an embattled parapet, a taller chancel, and a west steeple. The steeple has a three-stage tower, flanked at the base by stair bays, a doorway, a coped parapet with a gabled clock face on each side, corner pinnacles, and a spire with lucarnes. The chancel is in Perpendicular style, with crocketed pinnacles and a seven-light east window.[50][51] II
Handle Hall and barn
53°39′30″N 2°05′32″W / 53.65820°N 2.09235°W / 53.65820; -2.09235 (Handle Hall)
1820 The rebuilding of a house of 1610, with the barn added in the 1840s, they are in stone with a stone-slate roof. The house has quoins, an eaves cornice, two storeys and three bays. There are two doorways with ogee-headed lintels and hood moulds, and the windows are mullioned, those in the ground floor with hood moulds. Above a door is an inscribed and dated plaque. The barn to the right has a round-arch wagon entrance and round windows.[52] II
The Old Duke
53°38′35″N 2°05′19″W / 53.64311°N 2.08867°W / 53.64311; -2.08867 (The Old Duke)
Ealees, Littleborough - geograph.org.uk - 401314.jpg
1820 Originally a house, three cottages were added to the rear in the 1850s, and later combined into one house. The building was used as a public house in 1860, and since a private house. It is in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. The house has a single-depth plan, three storeys and three bays. The windows in the lower two floors are sashes and casements, and there is a continuous mullioned workshop window in the top floor. The former cottages have one bay each, a doorway with a square-cut surround, and mullioned window.[53] II
6 Church Street and
2 Todmorden Road
53°38′39″N 2°05′36″W / 53.64403°N 2.09341°W / 53.64403; -2.09341 (6 Church Street and 2 Todmorden Road)
Former Toll House, Littleborough.jpg
c. 1824 A former toll house, on a corner site, in stone with a stone-slate roof. It has two storeys and a basement, two bays and a canted corner. There are two doorways with square-cut surrounds, and the windows are casements.[54] II
3 Bear Hill
53°37′53″N 2°05′25″W / 53.63131°N 2.09028°W / 53.63131; -2.09028 (3 Bear Hill)
Early 19th century A stone house with quoins, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. It has a single-depth plan, two storeys, two bays, and a later brick wing and a conservatory at the rear. On the front is a central doorway with a square-cut surround, and mullioned windows, including a twelve-light workshop window in the upper floor. In the right gable end are four 20th-centiry casement windows.[55] II
8–12 Calderbrook Road
53°39′18″N 2°05′55″W / 53.65503°N 2.09867°W / 53.65503; -2.09867 (8–12 Calderbrook Road)
Early 19th century A terrace of five stone houses with quoins and a roof partly of stone-slate and partly of 20th-century tiles. The houses have a double-depth plan, two storeys, and one bay each. The doorways have square-cut surrounds, and the windows are mullioned, those in the upper floor having five (previously seven) lights.[56] II
4 Laws Terrace and 18, 20 and 22 New Street
53°38′27″N 2°06′46″W / 53.64083°N 2.11278°W / 53.64083; -2.11278 (4 Laws Terrace and 18, 20 and 22 New Street)
Early 19th century Two houses and a pair of back-to-back houses in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have three storeys, and each house has two bays and a central doorway with a square-cut surround. The windows are mullioned, some with six or seven lights, and there is a taking-in door converted into a window.[57] II
1, 2, 3 and 4 Middle Newgate
53°39′17″N 2°05′56″W / 53.65472°N 2.09889°W / 53.65472; -2.09889 (1, 2, 3 and 4 Middle Newgate)
Early 19th century A terrace of four stone houses with a stone-slate roof. They have two storeys and one bay each, and there is a small extension at the rear. The doorways have square-cut surrounds, and most of the windows are mullioned, with some 20th-century windows at the rear.[58] II
3 Sladen Fold and barn
53°39′27″N 2°04′45″W / 53.65754°N 2.07924°W / 53.65754; -2.07924 (3 Sladen Fold)
Early 19th century The house and barn are in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. The house has a single-depth plan, two storeys, and two bays, with the slightly earlier barn to the left. In the house is a central doorway with a square-cut surround, and the windows are mullioned. The barn has opposing cart entries, and an outshut to the left with a slate roof and a doorway with a chamfered surround.[59] II
57, 59, 61 and 63 Smithy Bridge Road and 2 and 3 Wrigley Place
53°37′58″N 2°06′35″W / 53.63272°N 2.10968°W / 53.63272; -2.10968 (57, 59, 61 and 63 Smithy Bridge Road and 2 and 3 Wrigley Place)
Early 19th century A row of back-to-back houses, later incorporating a shop, in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have three storeys, doorways with square-cut surrounds, and mullioned windows, including workshop windows in the upper floors, some with blocked lights.[60] II
58 Summit and 3 and 4 Fielden Street
53°39′47″N 2°05′00″W / 53.66297°N 2.08338°W / 53.66297; -2.08338 (58 Summit and 3 and 4 Fielden Street)
Early 19th century Originally four, later three houses in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have two storeys and four bays. There is a 20th-century porch, the windows are mullioned, there is a blocked shop window, and an entrance at basement level on the right.[61] II
Barn north of 1 and 3 Whittaker Fold
53°38′12″N 2°04′53″W / 53.63679°N 2.08133°W / 53.63679; -2.08133 (Barn north of 1 and 3 Whittaker Fold)
Early 19th century The barn is in stone with quoins and has a stone-slate roof with coped gables. It contains opposing elliptical-headed cart entries and circular pitching holes above. These are flanked by doorways with square-cut surrounds and more pitching holes. In the right gable is loft hatch, and in the left return are two more pitching holes.[62] II
Barrat Farmhouse and barn
53°39′31″N 2°03′49″W / 53.65868°N 2.06360°W / 53.65868; -2.06360 (Barrat Farmhouse)
Early 19th century A combined farmhouse and barn in stone with a stone-slate roof. The house to the right projects forward, it has a double-depth plan and one bay. There is a porch in the angle, some windows are mullioned and others have square-cut surrounds. The barn has a central arched cart entry with impost blocks flanked by doors with square-cut surrounds and windows, and above is an arched window with impost blocks, a keystone and a dated lintel.[63] II
Bents Farmhouse and barn
53°38′33″N 2°06′43″W / 53.64242°N 2.11188°W / 53.64242; -2.11188 (Bents Farmhouse)
Early 19th century The farmhouse and barn are in stone and has a stone-slate roof with coped gables. The house has quoins, a double-depth plan, two storeys and two bays. In the centre is a porch with a coped gable, and the doorway has a chamfered surround and an obtuse-angled lintel. The windows have mullions, one also has a transom, and all have hood moulds. The barn to the right has a lean-to extension, a rendered gable, opposed segmental-arched cart entries, pitching holes, and ventilation slits.[64] II
Hey Bottom Farmhouse and barn
53°39′24″N 2°05′49″W / 53.65657°N 2.09687°W / 53.65657; -2.09687 (Hey Bottom Farmhouse)
Early 19th century A combined farmhouse and barn in stone with quoins, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. The house has two storeys, three bays, and a rear wing. There is a central doorway with a square-cut surround, and the windows are mullioned. The barn to the right has rear lean-to extensions,a segmental-headed entry and a shippon door.[65] II
Higher Shore Farmhouse and barn
53°39′06″N 2°07′06″W / 53.65170°N 2.11838°W / 53.65170; -2.11838 (Higher Shore Farmhouse)
Early 19th century The farmhouse and barn are in stone with a stone-slate roof. The house has two storeys and two bays, and the windows are mulliond. The barn to the left is dated 1849, and has a rear outshut. It contains an elliptical headed entry, above which is a small window with a segmental lintel and impost blocks.[66] II
Hillview
53°38′36″N 2°05′20″W / 53.64335°N 2.08887°W / 53.64335; -2.08887 (Hillview)
Early 19th century A pair of cottages later combined into one house, in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. Each cottage has one room and an attic room, and a rear lean-to extension was added later. The doorways have square-cut surrounds, and each cottage has a two-light mullioned window containing a casement. There are gable lights in the attics and a later dormer at the rear.[67] II
Paul Row
53°39′39″N 2°05′07″W / 53.66084°N 2.08526°W / 53.66084; -2.08526 (Paul Row)
Early 19th century A row of cottages, originally eight, later six, in stone with a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, two storeys, and one bay each. The doorways have square-cut surrounds. The windows were originally mullioned, and some have been altered.[68] II
Barn, shippon and workshop,
Syke House Farm
53°37′50″N 2°04′49″W / 53.63060°N 2.08034°W / 53.63060; -2.08034 (Barn, shippon and workshop, Syke House Farm)
Syke - geograph.org.uk - 400470.jpg
Early 19th century The buildings are in stone with stone-slate roofs. In the barn are opposed cart entries with segmental heads and keystones, and circular windows above. The workshop has two storeys and three bays, a central doorway with a square-cut surround and a segmental head, and windows with wedge lintels.[69] II
Wilmers
53°40′00″N 2°05′02″W / 53.66678°N 2.08382°W / 53.66678; -2.08382 (Wilmers)
c. 1830 Originally four cottages and a workshop or cellar dwelling, later one house, it is in stone with a stone-slate roof. There is a double-depth plan, two storeys, four bays, and a left lean-to extension. On the front is a 20th-century porch and four doorways with square-cut surrounds, and the windows are mullioned.[70] II
Stormer Hill Bar
53°38′54″N 2°03′52″W / 53.64844°N 2.06433°W / 53.64844; -2.06433 (Stormer Hill Bar)
Bar House - geograph.org.uk - 1272040.jpg
1838 Originally a toll house provided for the Rochdale to Halifax and Elland Turnpike road, later a private house. A bay was added to the left in 1911 and a gabled porch to the front. The house is in stone with a brick porch and a left bay in brick on a stone plinth, and it has a stone-slate roof. There is one storey at the front, two at the rear, and a lean-to porch at the rear. The windows are sashes.[71] II
Railway Viaduct
53°38′37″N 2°05′36″W / 53.64367°N 2.09324°W / 53.64367; -2.09324 (Railway Viaduct)
Viaduct - geograph.org.uk - 1272036.jpg
1839 The viaduct was built by the Manchester and Leeds Railway, and is in stone. It consists of six elliptical arches, the northern being a skew arch. The arches have keystones, rusticated voussoirs, piers with impost blocks, and coped parapets with bands.[72] II
River Roch Aqueduct
53°39′31″N 2°04′59″W / 53.65865°N 2.08294°W / 53.65865; -2.08294 (River Roch Aqueduct)
River Roch Aqueduct.jpg
c. 1839 The aqueduct was built by the Manchester and Leeds Railway to carry the River Roch over the railway. It is in stone with cast iron walls, and has an S-shaped plan with a segmental skew arch.[73][74] II
Southern entrance of railway tunnel beneath Todmorden Road
53°39′33″N 2°04′59″W / 53.65921°N 2.08293°W / 53.65921; -2.08293 (Southern entrance of railway tunnel beneath Todmorden Road)
1839 The tunnel was built by the Manchester and Leeds Railway. The entrance to the tunnel is in stone, and consists of a segmental arch with a keystone. Above this is a band and a coped parapet, and it is flanked by tapering piers. On the parapet is a datestone containing the emblem of the railway company.[75] II
Southern entrance to Summit Tunnel
53°39′38″N 2°04′59″W / 53.66052°N 2.08310°W / 53.66052; -2.08310 (Southern entrance to Summit Tunnel)
Entrance to Summit Tunnel. - geograph.org.uk - 424169.jpg
1841 The tunnel was built by the Manchester and Leeds Railway. The entrance to the tunnel is in stone, and consists of a horseshoe arch, and has voussoirs with radial rustication. At parapet level are two bands.[76][77] II
County boundary stone
53°39′34″N 2°02′09″W / 53.65947°N 2.03588°W / 53.65947; -2.03588 (County boundary stone)
County boundary stone near Littleborough.jpg
Mid 19th century The boundary stone marks the boundary between the historical counties of Lancashire and Yorkshire. It has two angled faces and carries an inscription denoting its function.[78] II
St James' Church
53°39′37″N 2°05′25″W / 53.66031°N 2.09014°W / 53.66031; -2.09014 (St James' Church)
St James, The Parish Church of Calderbrook - geograph.org.uk - 450446.jpg
1860–64 The church, designed by George Shaw, is in stone and has a slate roof with coped gables and cross finials. It consists of a nave, a north aisle, a chancel, a central south steeple, and a south chapel. There is a bellcote between the nave and the chancel. The steeple has a three-stage tower with buttresses and a circular corner stair turret. At the top stage the tower broaches to an octagon, and it is surmounted by a spire.[79][80] II
The Roundhouse,
Wheatsheaf Buildings
53°38′37″N 2°05′45″W / 53.64367°N 2.09577°W / 53.64367; -2.09577 (The Roundhouse)
Building on the junction of Railway Street and Church Street - geograph.org.uk - 1272025.jpg
Early 1860s A building with a semicircular plan containing a public house and shops in stone with a slate roof. There are three storeys and ten bays, and it has a sill band, an impost band, an eaves cornice, and a pierced parapet. In the ground floor are two shop windows, and the other windows are sashes.[5][81] II
Folly
53°38′49″N 2°05′53″W / 53.64707°N 2.09809°W / 53.64707; -2.09809 (Folly)
c. 1900 or earlier The folly in Hare Hill Park consists of a grotto with a pool and containing a single-room building about 5 metres (16 ft) square and 2.5 metres (8 ft 2 in) high with rounded corners and a flat roof. On the southern side is a small cast iron water wheel about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) in diameter. The wheel is turned by water from a pipe and channel on the roof, and falls into the pool. On the west side of the building is a deep niche, and on the east side is a recess with a stone bench.[82] II
Bandstand
53°38′48″N 2°05′51″W / 53.64657°N 2.09744°W / 53.64657; -2.09744 (Bandstand)
Bandstand, Hare Hill Park.jpg
1902 The bandstand in Hare Hill Park has an octagonal plan. Steps lead to a platform on a gritstone base with a chamfered plinth. Four square decorative cast iron columns support a felted roof that has a central vent with a scrolled finial and a gold crown. On the plinth is an inscribed plaque.[83] II
Drinking fountain
53°38′47″N 2°05′49″W / 53.64634°N 2.09690°W / 53.64634; -2.09690 (Drinking fountain)
Drinking fountain, Hare Hill Park.jpg
1902 The drinking fountain in Hare Hill Park is in gritstone and polished granite, and is about 3 metres (9.8 ft) high. It consists of a two-stepped base, a two-stage plinth, polished granite bowls, a shaft with recesses containing taps or inscriptions, a pyramidal roof with triangular pediments, and a squat spire.[84] II
Littleborough War memorial
53°38′37″N 2°05′42″W / 53.64350°N 2.09513°W / 53.64350; -2.09513 (Littleborough War memorial)
Littleborough War Memorial.jpg
1922 The war memorial stands in a semicircular garden, it was designed by Bradshaw Gass & Hope, and is in York stone. It consists of an obelisk on a square pedestal on a stepped platform. On the front of the obelisk is a carved wreath, and on the top is a stone with a carved cross on each of four faces. On the front of the pedestal is an inscribed plaque, and behind the obelisk is a curved wall containing the names of those lost in both World Wars.[85] II
Shore Mill War Memorial
53°39′00″N 2°06′32″W / 53.64995°N 2.10895°W / 53.64995; -2.10895 (Shore Mill War memorial)
Shore Mill War Memorial.jpg
Early 1920s The war memorial stands in a memorial garden, and commemorates the employees of Shore Mill who were lost in the two World Wars. It is in granite and consists of a Latin cross on a tapering rectangular shaft, on a pedestal with canted sides, on a chamfered plinth. On the front of the cross is a roundel containing a Tudor rose. On the pedestal is an inscription and the names of those lost in the First World War, and on the plinth are the names of those lost in the Second World War.[86] II
63, 65, 67 and 69 Rakewood Road and 2 Schofield Hall Road
53°37′28″N 2°05′07″W / 53.62441°N 2.08520°W / 53.62441; -2.08520 (63, 65, 67 and 69 Rakewood Road and 2 Schofield Hall Road)
Undated A row of five stone houses with a stone-slate roof. They have single and double-depth plans, three storeys, each house has one bay, and there is a rear outshut. In the first bay is a segmental-arched cart entry. Most of the windows are mullioned, with workshop windows in the upper floors, and there is one casement window.[87] II

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Street View in June 2012 shows that the building has been converted for residential use.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Historic England
  2. ^ a b c d Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 252
  3. ^ Historic England & 1162360
  4. ^ Historic England & 1068515
  5. ^ a b Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 251
  6. ^ Historic England & 1068536
  7. ^ Historic England & 1309691
  8. ^ Historic England & 1068510
  9. ^ Historic England & 1068532
  10. ^ Historic England & 1309627
  11. ^ Historic England & 1068535
  12. ^ Historic England & 1068531
  13. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), pp. 251–252
  14. ^ Historic England & 1356234
  15. ^ Historic England & 1068525
  16. ^ Historic England & 1366286
  17. ^ Historic England & 1162194
  18. ^ Historic England & 1068517
  19. ^ Historic England & 1068533
  20. ^ Historic England & 1162280
  21. ^ Historic England & 1068534
  22. ^ Historic England & 1162368
  23. ^ Historic England & 1068511
  24. ^ Historic England & 1356235
  25. ^ Historic England & 1162349
  26. ^ Historic England & 1068514
  27. ^ Historic England & 1366285
  28. ^ Historic England & 1068524
  29. ^ Historic England & 1309716
  30. ^ Historic England & 1309654
  31. ^ Historic England & 1068538
  32. ^ Historic England & 1162398
  33. ^ Historic England & 1068513
  34. ^ Historic England & 1366284
  35. ^ Historic England & 1068529
  36. ^ Historic England & 1068519
  37. ^ Historic England & 1366281
  38. ^ Historic England & 1162311
  39. ^ Historic England & 1068521
  40. ^ Historic England & 1356237
  41. ^ Historic England & 1162331
  42. ^ Historic England & 1309668
  43. ^ Historic England & 1068522
  44. ^ Historic England & 1162303
  45. ^ Historic England & 1068527
  46. ^ Historic England & 1068516
  47. ^ Historic England & 1366282
  48. ^ Historic England & 1162288
  49. ^ Historic England & 1068523
  50. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 249
  51. ^ Historic England & 1068518
  52. ^ Historic England & 1162173
  53. ^ Historic England & 1068508
  54. ^ Historic England & 1162186
  55. ^ Historic England & 1068530
  56. ^ Historic England & 1068541
  57. ^ Historic England & 1068520
  58. ^ Historic England & 1162180
  59. ^ Historic England & 1366278
  60. ^ Historic England & 1309675
  61. ^ Historic England & 1162381
  62. ^ Historic England & 1068528
  63. ^ Historic England & 1366283
  64. ^ Historic England & 1366279
  65. ^ Historic England & 1068540
  66. ^ Historic England & 1162275
  67. ^ Historic England & 1068542
  68. ^ Historic England & 1309683
  69. ^ Historic England & 1366280
  70. ^ Historic England & 1309750
  71. ^ Historic England & 1068512
  72. ^ Historic England & 1068509
  73. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 254
  74. ^ Historic England & 1309744
  75. ^ Historic England & 1068537
  76. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 253
  77. ^ Historic England & 1162164
  78. ^ Historic England & 1278212
  79. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 250
  80. ^ Historic England & 1068539
  81. ^ Historic England & 1068526
  82. ^ Historic England & 1096140
  83. ^ Historic England & 1096139
  84. ^ Historic England & 1096138
  85. ^ Historic England & 1436965
  86. ^ Historic England & 1441226
  87. ^ Historic England & 1356236

Sources[edit]