Llanharan railway station

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Llanharan National Rail
Llanharan Railway Station 2008.jpg
Llanharan railway station from Llanharan Bridge
Location
PlaceLlanharan
Local authorityRhondda Cynon Taf
Coordinates51°32′17″N 3°26′28″W / 51.538°N 3.441°W / 51.538; -3.441Coordinates: 51°32′17″N 3°26′28″W / 51.538°N 3.441°W / 51.538; -3.441
Grid referenceST001830
Operations
Station codeLLR
Managed byTransport for Wales Rail
Number of platforms2
DfT categoryF2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 0.163 million
2014/15Increase 0.165 million
2015/16Increase 0.169 million
2016/17Increase 0.174 million
2017/18Increase 0.176 million
History
Original companySouth Wales Railway
Pre-groupingGreat Western Railway
1850Opened
2 November 1964Closed
10 December 2007Reopened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Llanharan from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Llanharan railway station serves the village of Llanharan in south Wales. Funded in part by SEWTA and at a cost of £4.3 million,[1] it opened in December 2007.[2] It is 156 miles (251 km) from London Paddington.

A former station was on the site until 1964,[2] when it was closed under the Beeching Cuts. Following local campaigning from residents with backing from the MP and AM. EC funding was secured and a new station was agreed and work began in 2007.

The station has two platforms connected by a footbridge and small shelters for passengers. It is unmanned but features CCTV and help points. A car park is next to the station.

The approved design features Corus Modular Platforms. The Modular Platform was selected as the majority of the structure can be erected with trains still running. Alternative forms of construction would have required extended blockage of the line (with associated disruption to through services on the South Wales Main Line).

The principal contractor for construction was Galliford Try Water & Rail, utilising local subcontractors where possible.

Services[edit]

Services are hourly Monday to Saturday in both directions, with four trains a day on Sunday. Services are operated by Transport for Wales Rail between Cardiff Central and Maesteg via Bridgend (with some eastbound services continuing to Cheltenham Spa), though the Sunday trains are through workings between Carmarthen or Milford Haven and Manchester Piccadilly.[3] A morning service to Manchester Piccadilly (Monday-Friday) leaves Llanharan Station at roughly 06:25.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Pontyclun   Transport for Wales
Maesteg Line
  Pencoed

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Janice Gregory AM for Ogmore". Archived from the original on 21 March 2012. Retrieved 15 March 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Village back on track 43 years on". BBC News. 10 December 2007. Retrieved 10 December 2007.
  3. ^ GB eNRT December 2015 Edition, Table 128