Mark V. Holmes

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Mark V. Holmes
Judge of the United States Tax Court
In office
June 30, 2003 – June 29, 2018
Appointed byGeorge W. Bush
Preceded byJulian Jacobs
Succeeded byVacant
Personal details
Born1960 (age 58–59)
New York, U.S.
EducationHarvard University (BA)
University of Chicago Law School (JD)

Mark Van Dyke Holmes (born 1960) is a Judge of the United States Tax Court.

Career[edit]

He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Harvard College in 1979 and his Juris Doctor from the University of Chicago Law School in 1983.

After graduating from law school, Holmes clerked for Judge Alex Kozinski of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, worked for Cahill Gordon & Reindel, Sullivan & Cromwell, and Miller & Chevalier, served as Counsel to the Chairman of the United States International Trade Commission, and spent two years as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the United States Department of Justice Tax Division.[1]

He was appointed by President George W. Bush to be a Judge of the United States Tax Court on June 30, 2003, for a term ending June 29, 2018.[2] He is known for writing colorful, engaging opinions on tax matters.[3]

On April 24, 2018, President Donald Trump nominated him for another 15 year term on the court.[4] On January 3, 2019, his nomination was returned to the President under Rule XXXI, Paragraph 6 of the United States Senate.

On February 6, 2019, his re-nomination was sent to the Senate.[5] His nomination is currently pending before the Senate Finance Committee.

Organizational memberships[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tax Division Names Three Deputy Assistant Attorneys General". United States Department of Justice. September 26, 2001. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ "Judge Mark V. Holmes profile". United States Tax Court. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ "Tax Court Judge Holmes and the art of judicial writing".
  4. ^ "Seven Nominations Sent to the Senate Today", The White House, April 24, 2018
  5. ^ "Twelve Nominations Sent to the Senate", The White House, February 6, 2019

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Julian Jacobs
Judge of the United States Tax Court
2003–2018
Vacant