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Maryland Route 300

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Maryland Route 300 marker

Maryland Route 300
Maryland Route 300 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length13.55 mi[1] (21.81 km)
2 sections
Existed1927–present
Major junctions
West end MD 213 in Church Hill
 
East end DE 300 at the Delaware state line near Sudlersville
Location
CountiesQueen Anne's
Highway system
MD 299US 301

Maryland Route 300 (MD 300) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. Known for most of its length as Sudlersville Road, the highway runs 13.55 miles (21.81 km) from MD 213 in Church Hill east through Sudlersville to the Delaware state line, where the highway continues as Delaware Route 300 (DE 300). MD 300 forms part of an east–west connection between U.S. Route 301 (US 301) in northern Queen Anne's County and Dover, Delaware. MD 300 between Church Hill and Dudley Corners was one of the original state roads marked for improvement in 1909, but the county constructed the highway with state aid in the mid- to late-1910s from Church Hill to Sudlersville. The highway from Sudlersville to the state line was built in the late 1920s and early 1930s. MD 300 was widened over its entire length around 1950 and extended west to US 213's bypass of Church Hill (now MD 213) around 1970. MD 300 was officially split in two when its superstreet intersection with US 301 was built in 2005.

Route description[edit]

View east along MD 300 at US 301 in northern Queen Anne's County

MD 300 begins at an intersection with MD 213 (Church Hill Road) in the northern part of the town of Church Hill. The highway heads east as two-lane Sudlersville Road and intersects MD 19 (Main Street) before leaving the town. The state highway heads northeast and intersects US 301 (Blue Star Memorial Highway) at a superstreet intersection next to a park and ride lot in the southwest quadrant. Traffic on MD 300 is required to turn right onto US 301, perform a U-turn, then turn right again to continue on MD 300. The highway curves east at Dudley Corners, where the route crosses Red Lion Branch and meets the southern end of MD 290 (Dudley Corner Road) and the north end of Benton Corners Road, which leads to the historic Dudley's Chapel.[1][2]

MD 300 continues east to the town of Sudlersville, through which the highway follows Main Street. The highway intersects MD 837 (Church Circle) and MD 313 (Church Street) before crossing the Centreville Branch of the Northern Line of the Maryland and Delaware Railroad. East of Sudlersville, MD 300 passes to the south of the historic John Embert Farm, crosses Unicorn Branch, and passes through the hamlets of Duhamel Corners and Peters Corners. MD 300 crosses Andover Branch and curves to the northeast at Busic Church Road to its eastern terminus at the Delaware state line, where Sudlersville Road continues east as DE 300 toward Smyrna. A short distance east of the state line at Everetts Corner, the highway intersects DE 44, which connects with DE 8, which leads to Dover.[1][2]

MD 300 is officially separated into two sections by the US 301 superstreet intersection; MD 300 runs east of US 301 and MD 300A is the portion west of the U.S. Highway.[1] The portion of the highway from US 301 to the Delaware state line is a part of the main National Highway System and that federal system's connection between US 301 and Dover also via DE 300, DE 44, and DE 8.[3][4]

History[edit]

In 1909, the Maryland State Roads Commission designated the Church Hill–Dudley Corners road as one of the original state roads to be constructed by the commission, as part of a connection to Crumpton.[5] However, by 1915 this route was no longer considered a necessary part of the statewide road system.[6] Queen Anne's County constructed with state aid two segments of 9-foot-wide (2.7 m) macadam road west from Sudlersville, both of which were widened to 15 feet (4.6 m) between 1924 and 1926.[7][8] The first segment, between Sudlersville and Dudley Corners, was completed by 1915.[6] The county also constructed a state-aided concrete road from Main Street in Church Hill east to the west end of the second macadam section in 1919 and 1920.[8][9][10] The state paved Sudlersville's Main Street in 1926.[7]

MD 300 from Sudlersville to the Delaware state line was constructed as a concrete road in four segments. The first segment to Duhamel Corners was completed in 1928.[11][12] The second segment was built in 1929, and the third segment through Peters Corners was completed in 1930.[13][14] The fourth section was started in 1930 and completed to the Delaware state line by 1933.[13][15] MD 300 was widened to 22 feet (6.7 m) and resurfaced with bituminous concrete in two concurrent projects, from US 213 in Church Hill through Sudlersville and from Sudlersville to the state line, in 1950 and 1951.[16] The highway was extended west to its current terminus as part of the project to build the Church Hill bypass in 1969 and 1970.[17][18] The MD 300–US 301 intersection was transformed into a superstreet intersection in 2005, resulting in the designation of MD 300A west of the junction.[19]

Junction list[edit]

The entire route is in Queen Anne's County.

Locationmi
[1]
kmDestinationsNotes
Church Hill0.000.00 MD 213 (Church Hill Road) – Centreville, ChestertownWestern terminus of MD 300A
0.160.26 MD 19 (Main Street) – Church Hill
3.926.31 US 301 (Blue Star Memorial Highway) – Bay Bridge, WilmingtonSuperstreet intersection; eastern terminus of MD 300A; western terminus of MD 300
Dudley Corners5.528.88 MD 290 north (Dudley Corner Road) – CrumptonSouthern terminus of MD 290
Sudlersville7.2811.72 MD 837 north (Church Circle)Southern terminus of MD 837
7.3411.81 MD 313 (Church Street) – Millington, Barclay
13.5521.81 DE 300 east (Sudlersville Road) – Dover, SmyrnaDelaware state line; eastern terminus of MD 300
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2016). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Staff. Maryland General Highway Statewide Grid Map (PDF) (Map) (2016 ed.). Maryland State Highway Administration. §§ E15A, E15B, D15D, D15C. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  3. ^ National Highway System: Maryland (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  4. ^ National Highway System: Delaware (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 20, 2015. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  5. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1910). Map of Maryland (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey.
  6. ^ a b Weller, O.E.; Parran, Thomas; Miller, W.B.; Perry, John M.; Ramsay, Andrew; Smith, J. Frank (May 1916). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1912–1915 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 54, 124. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  7. ^ a b Mackall, John N.; Darnall, R. Bennett; Brown, W.W. (January 1927). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1924–1926 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. pp. 33, 95. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  8. ^ a b Maryland Geological Survey (1923). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey.
  9. ^ Zouck, Frank H.; Uhl, G. Clinton; Mudd, John F. (January 1920). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1916–1919 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 47. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  10. ^ Mackall, John N.; Crothers, Omar D.; Winebrener, D.C. (January 1924). Annual Reports of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1920–1923 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 45. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  11. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1927). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey.
  12. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1928). Map of Maryland: Showing State Road System and State Aid Roads (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey.
  13. ^ a b Uhl, G. Clinton; Bruce, Howard; Shaw, John K. (October 1, 1930). Report of the State Roads Commission of Maryland (1927–1930 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission. p. 224–225. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  14. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1930). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey.
  15. ^ Maryland Geological Survey (1933). Map of Maryland Showing State Road System: State Aid Roads and Improved County Road Connections (Map). Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey.
  16. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Numbers: Q-236X-1 (December 14, 1949), Q-231X-1 (July 12, 1950). Retrieved November 8, 2017 – via Maryland State Archives.
  17. ^ Maryland Road Construction Progress Log (PDF). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration. Contract Number: Q-255-5-271 (June 26, 1969). Retrieved November 8, 2017 – via Maryland State Archives.
  18. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1971). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission.
  19. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2005). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved September 28, 2010.

External links[edit]

Route map:

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