Max Siegel (psychologist)

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Max Siegel
BornJuly 22, 1918[1]
DiedJanuary 1, 1988(1988-01-01) (aged 69)
NationalityAmerican
Scientific career
FieldsPsychology

Max Siegel (July 22, 1918 – January 1, 1988) was an American psychologist and past president of the American Psychological Association (APA). His faculty appointments included work at Brooklyn College and Nova Southeastern University.

Biography[edit]

Siegel studied psychology at City College of New York, where he earned undergraduate and master's degrees in psychology. He earned a PhD from New York University and then studied under psychoanalyst Erich Fromm. Siegel established a mental health clinic at Brooklyn College for military veterans after World War II.[2]

Siegel had a private psychotherapy practice in Brooklyn. He was a dean of students at Brooklyn College.[3] In 1963, he moved to Boca Raton, Florida in 1979 and entered semi-retirement, limiting his practice to two days per week. Siegel served on President Reagan's Task Force on Violent Crimes.[2] In semi-retirement, Siegel continued to work for Nova Southeastern University and gave an occasional lecture at Florida Atlantic University. Siegel was president of the APA in 1983. During his tenure as president, he led the APA's purchase of the Psychology Today magazine. He referred to the publication as "Siegel's folly" when the magazine ran into financial problems.[4]

Siegel died in a Boca Raton hospital in 1988 following a heart attack.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "APA Historical Database: On July 22". Central Washington University. Retrieved September 6, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Max Siegel, Ex-leader Of Psychologists` Group". Sun-Sentinel. January 6, 1988. Retrieved September 6, 2013.
  3. ^ "Dr. Max Siegel, Psychotherapist, 69". The New York Times. January 5, 1988. Retrieved September 6, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Josaitis, Mark (January 5, 1988). "Psychology leader eulogized". The Palm Beach Post. Retrieved September 6, 2013.