Military.com

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Military.com
Military.com Logo.svg
Available inEnglish
HeadquartersUnited States
OwnerMonster Worldwide[1]
EditorHope Hodge Seck
ParentRandstad Holding
Websitewww.military.com
Launched1999; 20 years ago (1999)
Current statusActive
ISSN2165-7726

Military.com is a website that provides news and information about benefits to military members, veterans, their families and those with military affinity.

Founded in 1999, the site has been a division of Monster Worldwide since 2004. Among the company's revenue streams are advertising, veteran employment, and lead generation for for-profit colleges.[2]

About 10 million people have registered on the site, according to the company.[1] The site offers a dozen newsletters, seven military blogs, and 11 content channels, including Benefits, News, Veteran Jobs, Military Life, Videos, and Discounts. Other sub-channels include information for spouses, resources to use the GI Bill, and entertainment and fitness. Military.com also offers three apps on iOS and Android: Military News App, Military Pay App and Transition App to help servicemembers move to civilian life.

History[edit]

The website was founded by Christopher Michel in 1999 and went live in 2000.[1][3] Its advisory board originally included two former members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as other academic and business leaders.[1] In 2004, Military.com was acquired by Monster Worldwide in 2004[1] for around $39.5 million.[4] In August 2016, Ranstad Holding acquired Monster Worldwide.

Previous presidents of Military.com include retired Rear Admiral Greg Smith who was president of Military.com and a vice-president at Monster from November 2014 to August 2017,[5] and retired Rear Admiral Terry McCreary who was president of the company from 2010 to 2014.

Newsroom[edit]

Military.com’s news team includes:

  • Managing Editor Hope Hodge Seck, who has been covering military issues since 2009. Her awards include multiple North Carolina Press Association Honors, the 2015 and 2017 Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Heinl awards[6] for feature writing, the Military Reporters and Editors Association 2015 award for domestic military coverage, and the 2016 American Legion 4th Estate Award [7] for print reporting. She is also a member of the board of directors at the Military Reporters and Editors Association.
  • Oriana Pawlyk, who is Military.com’s air warfare reporter. Before joining Military.com, Pawlyk covered air campaign operations in the Middle East and Europe, plus uniforms, cyber, Guard and Reserve duties, physical training and technology for Air Force Times, and she was a Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow in 2013.
  • Amy Bushatz, who joined Military.com in 2010 as an associate news editor and a blogger for Military.com’s SpouseBuzz blog. She is now senior content editor and military-spouse-and-family-issues reporter.
  • Richard Sisk, who has been Military.com’s Pentagon reporter since 2016, and has more than 45 years in reporting and editing in the U.S. and abroad for United Press International, the N.Y. Daily News, and now for Military.com. Sisk is a Vietnam veteran who served with the 2nd Battalion, Fourth Marines, in 1967-68.
  • Matthew Cox, who has covered the Army and other services, focusing on small arms, individual equipment and modernization. His embeds with the military in Iraq and Afghanistan were mostly with Stryker and light infantry platoons. He spent four years as an infantryman in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division.

Criticisms[edit]

Military.com has been criticized for taking advertising from for-profit colleges. Its partner in lead generation, QuinStreet, previously settled with the U.S. government after being accused of preying on veterans.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "About Us". Military.com. Retrieved 2018-04-11.
  2. ^ Halperin, David (2016-02-01). "Military-Branded Websites Push Veterans to Troubled For-Profit Colleges". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2018-04-20.
  3. ^ BusinessWeek, Christopher P. Michel
  4. ^ Monster Worldwide, 16 March 2004, Monster Worldwide Announces Strategic Interactive Acquisition; Acquires Military Advantage, Inc. to Drive Growth and Expansion in United States Government Sector
  5. ^ "Greg Smith LinkedIN profile". linkedin.com. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  6. ^ Military.com. "Military.com Reporter Wins Prestigious Award". www.prnewswire.com. Retrieved 2018-04-11.
  7. ^ "Legion announces 2016 recipients of top journalism award". The American Legion. Retrieved 2018-04-11.
  8. ^ Halperin, David (2016-02-01). "Military-Branded Websites Push Veterans to Troubled For-Profit Colleges". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2018-04-11.

External links[edit]