Ministry of Housing and Urban Development

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Ministry of Housing and Urban Development
Ministry of Housing and Urban Development Logo.png
Agency overview
Formed1 October 2018[1]
JurisdictionNew Zealand
Annual budgetVote Housing and Urban Development
Total budget for 2019/20
Increase$2,228,080,000[2]
Ministers responsible
Agency executive
  • Andrew Crisp,
    Chief Executive[3]
WebsiteMinistry of Housing and Urban Development

The Ministry of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is a cabinet-level public service department responsible for overseeing the New Zealand Government's housing and urban development programme. It formally came into existence on 1 October 2018 and assumes the housing policy, funding and regulatory functions of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE), the Ministry of Social Development (MSD), and the New Zealand Treasury. It is headed by the Minister of Housing Megan Woods and the Minister of Urban Development Phil Twyford.[1][3]

History[edit]

On 8 June 2018, Housing Minister Phil Twyford announced the creation of the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development to coordinate the New Zealand Government's efforts to combat the country's housing shortage and to facilitate the provision of affordable social housing. The new ministry was established on 1 August and commenced operating on 1 October 2018.[4] While Twyford argued that the new ministry would "restore the basic right to healthy, affordable housing for all New Zealanders", the opposition National Party Housing Spokesperson Judith Collins and housing lobby group the Property Institute's Chief Executive Ashley Church questioned its effectiveness.[5]

In mid-January, the Head of KiwiBuild Stephen Barclay resigned following a disagreement with Twyford over transferring oversight of the building programme from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to Housing and Urban and Development.[6][7] Later reports indicated that staff, advisers, and contractors were dissatisfied with Barclay's management style and leadership. In response, Barclay announced that he was filing a "constructive dismissal case" against the Ministry alleging they had breached his privacy. This development accompanied the Housing Minister's acknowledgement that the Government was unable to deliver on its target of building 1,000 homes by 1 July 2019.[8][9]

Following a cabinet reshuffle in late June 2019, the Housing and Urban Development ministry was split into two separate portfolios. Megan Woods became Minister of Housing while Twyford was demoted to Minister of Urban Development. This new division of labour came in response to the failure of the Labour-led coalition government's flagship KiwiBuild scheme. Kris Faafoi was appointed as Associate Minister of Housing with responsibility for urban housing while Nanaia Mahuta was appointed Associate Minister of Housing with responsibility for Māori housing.[10][11]

Functions[edit]

The Ministry of Housing and Urban Development is responsible for advising and delivering the Government's housing and urban development programme. Key priorities include addressing homelessness, increasing public and private housing supply, promoting healthier and warmer homes, making housing more affordable to rent and to buy, and supporting quality urban development and thriving communities.[12]

HUD consolidates a range of housing policy, funding, and regulatory functions from the following government departments:

  • The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment: housing and urban policy, KiwiBuild, the Community Housing Regulatory Authority and administration of funding for HomeStart, Welcome Home Loans, the legacy Social Housing Fund and Community Group Housing.
  • The Ministry of Social Development: public housing purchasing, homelessness policy and response, and emergency, transitional

and public housing policy.

The HUD is in charge of the Government's KiwiBuild scheme project. It also works closely with MBIE, MSD, the Treasury, Te Puni Kōkiri (Ministry of Māori Development), Housing New Zealand, and Corrections New Zealand.[5][3]

Leadership and structure[edit]

HUD comes under the oversight of Housing Minister Megan Woods, Minister of Urban Development Phil Twyford, Associate Minister of Housing (Public Housing) Kris Faafoi, and Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing) Nanaia Mahuta.[1] The HUD's leadership team consists of Chief Executive Andrew Crisp, DCE Policy Jo Hughes, DCE Public Housing Supply Scott Gallacher, Head of People and Culture Catherine Taylor, Chief Financial Office Jo Hogg, Head of the Office of Chief Executive Brad Ward, and DCE Strategy Development Nick Maling.[13]

The HUD is also assisted by a Ministerial Advisory Group (MAG) that serves an advisory role. As of 2019, the Advisory Group consists of:

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "About HUD". Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  2. ^ "Total Appropriations for Each Vote". Budget 2019. The Treasury.
  3. ^ a b c d "HUD Factsheet 1 October 2018" (PDF). Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  4. ^ "New Housing and Urban Development Ministry". New Zealand Government. Scoop. 8 June 2018. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  5. ^ a b Walls, Jason (1 October 2018). "Twyford today launched the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development, but what is it?". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  6. ^ Sachdeva, Sam (18 January 2019). "KiwiBuild boss resigns after reports of dispute". Newsroom. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  7. ^ Molyneux, Vita (18 January 2019). "Kiwibuild boss Stephen Barclay resigns". Newsroom. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  8. ^ McCullogh, Craig (28 January 2019). "Former KiwiBuild boss to launch legal action". Radio New Zealand. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  9. ^ Cooke, Henry (28 January 2019). "Former KiwiBuild boss Stephen Barclay suing Government over departure, says he was on track to meet first year goal". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  10. ^ Small, Zane (27 June 2019). "Jacinda Ardern's Cabinet reshuffle: Phil Twyford's Housing portfolio split into three". Newshub. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  11. ^ "Winners and losers - PM reveals first substantive Cabinet reshuffle". Radio New Zealand. 27 June 2019. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  12. ^ "What we do". Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  13. ^ "Leadership team". Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  14. ^ "Ministerial Advisory Group". Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Retrieved 1 February 2019.

External links[edit]