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Missouri Route 48

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Route 48 marker

Route 48
Route 48 highlighted in orange
Route information
Maintained by MoDOT
Length20.128 mi[1] (32.393 km)
Existedc. 1926–present
Major junctions
West end US 71 North of Savannah
East end US 169 / Route Z in King City
Location
CountiesAndrew, Gentry
Highway system
Route 47Route 49

Route 48 is a state highway in northwestern Missouri. Its western terminus is located at U.S. Route 71 (US 71) north of Savannah. The route travels eastward across the communities of Rosendale, Rea, and Whitesville. The road ends at US 169 in King City, about 20 miles (32 km) from its western terminus. The road was designated around 1926, and was completely laid down with gravel by 1936 and paved in asphalt by 1942.

Route description[edit]

J. F. Roberts Octagonal Barn, located on Route 48

The route is located in Andrew and Gentry counties.[1] In 2015, Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) calculated as many as 876 vehicles traveling on Route 48 east of US 71, and as few as 527 vehicles traveling west of Route B. This is expressed in terms of annual average daily traffic (AADT), a measure of traffic volume for any average day of the year.[2]

Route 48 starts at the intersection of US 71 and County Road 43 (CRD 43) and travels eastward. The road passes by a school and travels through farmland, and turns northeastward at CRD 146. East of CRD 149, the route shifts southward and crosses over the One Hundred and Two River, the city limit of Rosendale. Traversing the northern edge of the city as Main Street, the road intersects Route C, also known as Lake Street. The road soon leaves the town, and begins travelling northeastward again. At CRD 127, the route travels eastward, and enters Rea at CRD 117 as Byers Street. Route 48 intersects four city streets before leaving the city.[1] The entrance to the J. F. Roberts Octagonal Barn, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located past the intersection of Routes 48 and B.[3][4] The road then intersects the northern terminus of Route D, and crosses over the Platte River. Route 48 intersects CRD 198 and CRD 201 in the unincorporated area of Whitesville,[1] and crosses the Agee Creek past CRD 91 and CRD 200. The road continues through farmland and crosses the Crooked Creek.[5] Between CRD 226 and CRD 227, Route 48 intersects Routes M and P and shifts slightly southward. The road enters Gentry County past CRD 111 and CRD 235.[1] Past CRD 417, the route crosses over the Elm Grove Branch,[5] and the Third Fork after CRD 432.[1] Route 48 enters King City as Empire Avenue, west of its intersection with Route CC. The road continues into the city, intersecting multiple city streets and driveways. The route ends at the intersection with US 169, also known as Connecticut Street inside the city. The road continues as Route Z, which ends at Pattonsburg.[1]

History[edit]

The Route 48 designation first appeared on state maps in 1926, as an unimproved road starting from US 71 and ending at Route 4 in King City.[6] A bridge at the One Hundred and Two River that carried the route was built in 1929,[7] with a cost of $49,087.[8] A large section of Route 4 was designated as US 169 in 1931, including Route 48's eastern terminus, and the Route 48 sections in Gentry County and from US 71 to Rosendale in Andrew Country were improved and had new gravel laid down;[9][10] the paving costs were $101,176 (equivalent to $1,666,858 in 2018) and $150,282 (equivalent to $2,475,871 in 2018) respectively.[11][8] About two years later, gravel was laid down from Whitesville to the Andrew–Gentry county line.[12][13] The remaining section from Rosendale to Whitesville was laid down with gravel by 1936.[14][15] The first asphalt paving on the route began in 1938, where the Gentry County section was paved first,[16][17] with a cost of $38,861 (equivalent to $691,689 in 2018).[18] The rest of the route was paved in asphalt four years later.[19][20] Route 48 was resurfaced and shoulders were reshaped in 1974 from Rosendale to King City, which cost $435,278.46 (equivalent to $2,211,344 in 2018).[21] The bridge at the One Hundred and Two River was replaced by a new bridge in October 2014.[7]

Major intersections[edit]

Routes 48 and C in Rosendale
CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinations[5]Notes
Andrew0.0000.000 US 71 – Savannah, MaryvilleWestern terminus
Rosendale3.4375.531 Route C (Lake Street) – SavannahNorthern terminus of Route C
8.02812.920 Route B – BolckowSouthern terminus of Route B
8.51713.707 Route D to US 169Northern terminus of Route D
13.93022.418 Route M / Route P to US 169Northern terminus of Route M; Southern terminus of Route P
GentryKing City19.29431.051 Route CCSouthern terminus of Route CC
20.12832.393 US 169 (Connecticut Street) / Route Z (Empire Avenue)Eastern terminus; Western terminus of Route Z

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Missouri Department of Transportation (February 7, 2018). MoDOT HPMAPS (Map). Missouri Department of Transportation. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  2. ^ Northwest District Travel Volume and Commercial Vehicle Count Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri Department of Transportation. Missouri Department of Transportation. 2015. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  3. ^ "Roberts, J.F., Octagonal Barn". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  4. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Roberts. J. F.. Octagonal Barn" (PDF). Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c Google (February 7, 2018). "Missouri Route 48" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  6. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1926. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Thacker, Nadia (October 2, 2014). "Rosendale bridge now open". St. Joseph Post. St. Joseph, Missouri. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  8. ^ a b "State Highway Officials Here". Stanberry Headlight. Stanberry, Missouri. April 14, 1932. p. 9. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  9. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1930. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  10. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1931. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  11. ^ "State Highway Officials Here". Stanberry Headlight. Stanberry, Missouri. April 14, 1932. p. 1. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  12. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1932. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  13. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1933. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  14. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1935. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  15. ^ Map of Missouri Showing State Road System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1936. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  16. ^ 1937 Missouri Road Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1937. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  17. ^ Missouri Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1938. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  18. ^ "$235,747 Highway Work in County". The Albany Capital. Albany, Missouri. February 16, 1935. Retrieved February 7, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  19. ^ 1941 Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1941. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  20. ^ 1942 Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by Missouri State Highway Commission. Missouri State Highway Commission. 1942. Retrieved February 7, 2018.
  21. ^ "Contract Awarded For Route 48 Work in Two Counties". Stanberry Headlight. Stanberry, Missouri. December 19, 1974. p. 4. Retrieved March 4, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access

External links[edit]

Route map:

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