Morrison County, Minnesota

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Morrison County, Minnesota
Morrison Co Courthouse 1.jpg
Morrison County Courthouse
Map of Minnesota highlighting Morrison County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 25, 1856[1]
Named forWilliam and Allan Morrison
SeatLittle Falls
Largest cityLittle Falls
Area
 • Total1,153 sq mi (2,986 km2)
 • Land1,125 sq mi (2,914 km2)
 • Water28 sq mi (73 km2), 2.5%
Population (est.)
 • (2016)32,821
 • Density30/sq mi (10/km2)
Congressional district8th
Time zoneCentral: UTC−6/−5
Websitewww.co.morrison.mn.us

Morrison County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,198.[2] Its county seat is Little Falls.[3]

History[edit]

Dakotah and Ojibwe Indians lived in central Minnesota around the Mississippi River. French and English fur traders and voyageurs traveled through Minnesota from the 17th century to the 19th century. They used the river to transport their goods and trade with the natives. The county was named for fur trading brothers William and Allan Morrison.

In the 19th century three prominent explorers led expeditions along the river through the area that became Morrison County. Zebulon Montgomery Pike came through in 1805. Governor Lewis B. Cass led an expedition through the area in 1820. Joseph N. Nicollet, explorer and scientist, created the first accurate map of the area along the river in 1836.

Missionaries were some of the area's first European settlers. Methodist missionaries settled temporarily along the Little Elk River in 1838. The Reverend Frederic and Elisabeth (Taylor) Ayer moved to the Belle Prairie area in 1849. They started a mission and school there for the Ojibwe. Father Francis Xavier Pierz came to the area in 1852 and started many communities in central Minnesota, including Sobieski and Rich Prairie (later renamed Pierz) in Morrison County.

The event that prodded further development of the county was the building of Fort Ripley. In order to construct this military outpost, the Little Falls Mill and Land Company built a dam and sawmill in 1849. The company was formed by James Green, Allan Morrison, Henry M. Rice, John Irvine, John Blair Smith Todd, and Napoleon Jackson Tecumseh Dana. Fort Ripley was ostensibly built to protect the Winnebago Indians, who had been relocated by Henry Rice from Iowa to central Minnesota west of the Mississippi River, between the Crow Wing and Long Prairie rivers. Rice hoped the Winnebago would act as a buffer between the warring Ojibwe and Dakotah. His plan was unsuccessful and in 1855 the Winnebago were moved to the Blue Earth River in southern Minnesota.

Little Falls, the county seat, sprang up when the Little Falls Company (later called the Little Falls Manufacturing Company) built a second dam. This dam washed out, as the first had done, and Little Falls entered a long period of economic depression and stagnant population. Bit by bit, Little Falls grew, until it was officially incorporated as a village in 1879.

Soils of Morrison County[4]
Soils of Rice Area Sportsmen's WMA neighborhood

Another wave of immigration occurred between 1880 and 1920. A wide variety of ethnic groups[5] settled in Morrison County. This wave of immigration was spurred by the construction of the third dam at Little Falls in 1887. A group of investors from Louisville, Kentucky led by M. M. Williams financed the dam. To be sure their investment would succeed, they encouraged other major industries to move to the city, touting the water power.

Pine Tree Lumber Company, run by Charles A. Weyerhaeuser and Richard "Drew" Musser,[6] was one business that took advantage of the water power, with their operations in Little Falls beginning in 1890. Hennepin Paper Company also started operations that year in the city.

In 1889 the Louisville investors drew up a charter to transform Little Falls from a village to a city. Nathan Richardson, one of the original organizers of Morrison County, became the city's first mayor.[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,153 square miles (2,990 km2), of which 1,125 square miles (2,910 km2) is land and 28 square miles (73 km2) (2.5%) is water.[8]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860618
18701,681172.0%
18805,875249.5%
189013,325126.8%
190022,89171.8%
191024,0535.1%
192025,8417.4%
193025,442−1.5%
194027,4738.0%
195025,832−6.0%
196026,6413.1%
197026,9491.2%
198029,3118.8%
199029,6041.0%
200031,7127.1%
201033,1984.7%
Est. 201632,821[9]−1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2016[2]

As of the 2000 census, there were 31,712 people, 11,816 households, and 8,460 families residing in the county. The population density was 28 people per square mile (11/km²). There were 13,870 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.48% White, 0.21% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 0.55% from two or more races. 0.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 45.4% were of German, 18.8% Polish, 7.3% Norwegian and 5.7% Swedish ancestry. 96.7% spoke English, 1.4% Spanish and 1.2% German as their first language.

There were 11,816 households out of which 34.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.40% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.40% were non-families. 24.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.00% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 26.70% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 15.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 101.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,047, and the median income for a family was $44,175. Males had a median income of $31,037 versus $22,244 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,566. About 7.50% of families and 11.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.40% of those under age 18 and 18.50% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 73.4% 12,925 20.7% 3,637 6.0% 1,052
2012 60.8% 10,159 36.8% 6,153 2.4% 402
2008 58.1% 9,735 39.1% 6,547 2.8% 461
2004 57.9% 9,698 40.5% 6,794 1.6% 266
2000 55.9% 8,197 35.9% 5,274 8.2% 1,206
1996 38.0% 5,054 43.1% 5,728 18.9% 2,506
1992 34.9% 5,038 38.7% 5,588 26.4% 3,816
1988 49.9% 6,598 48.9% 6,469 1.2% 160
1984 54.4% 7,556 44.9% 6,225 0.7% 99
1980 44.9% 6,296 49.4% 6,930 5.7% 792
1976 34.5% 4,590 61.5% 8,176 4.0% 528
1972 46.4% 5,714 48.6% 5,993 5.1% 622
1968 40.1% 4,511 54.3% 6,111 5.6% 634
1964 31.9% 3,515 67.9% 7,492 0.2% 25
1960 37.4% 4,403 62.4% 7,337 0.2% 24
1956 51.8% 5,042 47.8% 4,653 0.3% 32
1952 56.9% 6,050 42.8% 4,551 0.4% 38
1948 38.9% 3,922 59.7% 6,026 1.4% 144
1944 55.9% 5,035 43.6% 3,920 0.5% 47
1940 52.4% 5,734 47.0% 5,144 0.5% 58
1936 27.2% 2,682 62.1% 6,112 10.7% 1,054
1932 24.1% 2,198 73.6% 6,712 2.3% 213
1928 42.2% 3,846 57.3% 5,222 0.6% 51
1924 41.6% 3,128 10.2% 769 48.1% 3,617
1920 77.6% 5,371 16.3% 1,131 6.1% 422
1916 48.8% 1,887 42.7% 1,650 8.5% 327
1912 19.2% 699 36.8% 1,341 44.0% 1,605[15]
1908 53.3% 1,936 41.7% 1,513 5.0% 183
1904 66.7% 2,498 30.1% 1,128 3.1% 117
1900 49.3% 1,880 48.2% 1,838 2.6% 99
1896 51.8% 1,960 45.8% 1,734 2.4% 92
1892 37.8% 1,135 52.7% 1,585 9.5% 286

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved March 18, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. ^ Nelson, Steven (2011). Savanna Soils of Minnesota. Minnesota: Self. pp. 53 - 56. ISBN 978-0-615-50320-2.
  5. ^ "Morrison County, MN Immigration - Ethnic Settlements (1840s - Early 1900s)" (PDF). morrisoncountyhistory.org. Retrieved 2018-10-09.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-03-10. Retrieved 2011-06-26.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "History – Morrison County Historical Society". morrisoncountyhistory.org. Retrieved 2018-10-09.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-10-09.
  15. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 1,327 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 223 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 41 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 14 votes.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°58′N 94°22′W / 45.967°N 94.367°W / 45.967; -94.367