National Institute of Indigenous Peoples

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The National Institute of Indigenous Peoples (Spanish: Instituto Nacional de los Pueblos Indígenas, INPI) is a decentralized agency of the Mexican Federal Public Administration. It was established on December 4, 2018, though the earliest Mexican government agency for indigenous matters was created in 1948. It is headquartered in Mexico City and headed by Adelfo Regino Montes.

History[edit]

National Indigenist Institute[edit]

The National Indigenist Institute was established in 1948, with the initial goal of integrating indigenous people into the national culture.[1]:7 The agency carried out health and education campaigns, and it also relocated more than 22,000 people displaced by the construction of the Miguel Alemán Dam in Oaxaca. Three years later, it established the first Indigenous Coordination Center, at San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas. In the 1970s, the focus of the agency shifted to "elevating" the life of indigenous people to help them participate in the national life, and later to assisting them while protecting their right to preserve their ethnic identity.

National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples[edit]

National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples logo used during the government of Felipe Calderón

On May 21, 2003, the Spanish: Ley de la Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas (National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples Act) created a new agency, the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples (Spanish: Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas, which took on all of the CDI's functions and responsibilities.

National Institute of Indigenous Peoples[edit]

Incoming president Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced on August 14, 2018, that the CDI would be replaced with a new National Institute of Indigenous Peoples, announcing Adelfo Regino Montes, the former secretary of indigenous matters in the state government of Oaxaca.[2]

On December 4, 2018, the National Institute of Indigenous Peoples Law (Spanish: Ley del Instituto Nacional de los Pueblos Indígenas) was promulgated.[3]

Mission[edit]

The National Institute of Indigenous Peoples is recognized as "the authority of the Federal Executive in matters related to indigenous and Afro-Mexican peoples", creating, defining, executing and coordinating policies and programs to guarantee their rights, as well as their integral and sustainable development and the strengthening of their cultures and identities, in accordance with Article 2 of the Political Constitution of the United Mexican States.

Operations[edit]

The INPI operates in 24 states through 10 Coordinating Centres for Indigenous Development; a Research, Information, and Documentation Centre; and 28 Regional Indigenous Development Centres. It maintains a network of 1085 school hostels (albergues escolares), used to provide mid-week accommodation for pupils for whom it is too far to travel to school every day.

Broadcasting[edit]

The National Institute of Indigenous Peoples operates the Cultural Indigenous Broadcasting System, which operates 21 radio stations primarily transmitting on AM frequencies and four low-power stations at Mayan schools in the state of Yucatán. The first station, XEZV-AM in Tlapa de Comonfort, Guerrero, signed on in 1979.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Instituto Nacional Indigenista - Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas 1948 - 2012" (PDF). CDI. 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  2. ^ "AMLO anuncia creación del Instituto Nacional de Pueblo Indígenas; Adelfo Regino, el titular". El Financiero. 14 August 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  3. ^ DOF: "DECRETO por el que se expide la Ley del Instituto Nacional de los Pueblos Indígenas y se abroga la Ley de la Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas.", December 4, 2018
INALI [Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas] (14 January 2008). "Catálogo de las lenguas indígenas nacionales: Variantes lingüísticas de México con sus autodenominaciones y referencias geoestadísticas" (PDF online facsimile). Diario Oficial de la Federación (in Spanish). México, D.F.: Imprenta del Gobierno Federal, SEGOB. 652 (9): 22–78 (first section), 1–96 (second section), 1–112 (third section). OCLC 46461036.
Pellicer, Dora; Bábara Cifuentes; Carmen Herrera (2006). "Legislating diversity in twenty-first century Mexico". In Margarita G. Hidalgo (ed.). Mexican Indigenous Languages at the Dawn of the Twenty-first Century. Contributions to the sociology of language, no. 91. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. pp. 127–168. ISBN 978-3-11-018597-3. OCLC 62090844.

External links[edit]