National Register of Historic Places listings in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Location of Lac qui Parle County in Minnesota

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota. It is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.

There are 10 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county. A supplementary list includes three additional sites that were formerly on the National Register.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted April 12, 2019.[1]

Current listings[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location City or town Description
1 Camp Release State Monument
Camp Release State Monument
March 14, 1973
(#73000981)
About 2 miles southwest of Montevideo off U.S. Route 212
44°55′58″N 95°44′54″W / 44.932861°N 95.748333°W / 44.932861; -95.748333 (Camp Release State Monument)
Montevideo vicinity Surrender site where prisoners taken by the Dakota people were released at the conclusion of the Dakota War of 1862 and the first military trials were held.[4] Marked with an 1894 monument.
2 Commercial Bank Building
Commercial Bank Building
January 28, 1982
(#82002978)
6th St.
44°55′46″N 96°03′16″W / 44.929564°N 96.054458°W / 44.929564; -96.054458 (Commercial Bank Building)
Dawson Well-preserved example of a 19th-century Richardsonian Romanesque bank, built in 1892 for Christopher M. Anderson, an influential early pioneer and civic leader in Lac qui Parle County, and founder of Dawson.[5]
3 Dawson Armory and Community Building
Dawson Armory and Community Building
May 18, 1995
(#95000615)
676 Pine St.
44°55′45″N 96°03′20″W / 44.929175°N 96.055653°W / 44.929175; -96.055653 (Dawson Armory and Community Building)
Dawson Multipurpose 1923 facility representative of the Minnesota National Guard armories of the 1920s, and the longserving center of Dawson's civic life, housing the city's offices and principal meeting spaces.[6]
4 Dawson Carnegie Library
Dawson Carnegie Library
August 15, 1985
(#85001770)
677 Pine St.
44°55′43″N 96°03′20″W / 44.928705°N 96.055688°W / 44.928705; -96.055688 (Dawson Carnegie Library)
Dawson Neoclassical Carnegie library built 1917–8, representing the philanthropy of the Carnegie Foundation, the work of regional architect A. H. Foss, and the civic importance of the Dawson Public Library, founded in the 1890s.[7]
5 Lac qui Parle County Courthouse
Lac qui Parle County Courthouse
August 15, 1985
(#85001759)
600 6th St.
45°00′54″N 96°11′35″W / 45.015082°N 96.193188°W / 45.015082; -96.193188 (Lac qui Parle County Courthouse)
Madison Monumental 1899 courthouse designed by Buechner & Jacobson, and a symbol of Madison's triumph in a protracted 17-year battle for county seat status.[8]
6 Lac qui Parle Mission Archeological Historic District
Lac qui Parle Mission Archeological Historic District
March 14, 1973
(#73000971)
Address restricted
45°01′28″N 95°52′04″W / 45.024365°N 95.86789°W / 45.024365; -95.86789 (Lac qui Parle Mission Archeological Historic District)
Montevideo vicinity Sites of the 1826 Fort Renville trading post and an 1841 mission church (reconstructed in the 1940s), plus associated Euro-American and Dakota habitations. Extends into Chippewa County.[9]
7 Lac qui Parle State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic District
Lac qui Parle State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic District
August 19, 1991
(#91001055)
Off County Highway 33 at the southeastern end of Lac qui Parle
45°01′17″N 95°53′11″W / 45.021389°N 95.886389°W / 45.021389; -95.886389 (Lac qui Parle State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic District)
Montevideo vicinity Three park facilities built 1938–41, significant as examples of Depression-era federal work relief, the extensive New Deal projects conducted around Lac qui Parle, and National Park Service rustic architecture.[10]
8 Louisburg School
Louisburg School
June 20, 1986
(#86001348)
1st St. at 3rd Ave.
45°10′06″N 96°10′17″W / 45.168374°N 96.171273°W / 45.168374; -96.171273 (Louisburg School)
Louisburg One of west-central Minnesota's best examples of a Victorian public school—built in 1911—and an emblem of the efforts in the state's small communities to provide local school facilities.[11]
9 Madison Carnegie Library
Madison Carnegie Library
August 23, 1985
(#85001823)
401 6th Ave.
45°00′45″N 96°11′37″W / 45.012472°N 96.193498°W / 45.012472; -96.193498 (Madison Carnegie Library)
Madison One of west-central Minnesota's earliest and most stylistically unusual Carnegie libraries, built 1905–6, and one of three monumental public buildings forming Madison's distinctive civic campus.[12]
10 Madison City Hall
Madison City Hall
August 23, 1985
(#85001820)
404 6th Ave.
45°00′45″N 96°11′34″W / 45.012553°N 96.192817°W / 45.012553; -96.192817 (Madison City Hall)
Madison Neoclassical city hall and opera house designed by Buechner & Orth and built 1902–3, a long-serving center of civic and social life and a representative of Madison's expansive early-20th-century community planning.[13]

Former listings[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listedDate removed Location City or town Summary
1 Hotel Lac qui Parle December 6, 1990
(#90001820)
August 2, 2000 202 6th Ave.
Madison 1902 hotel.[14] Demolished in 1999.[15]
2 Andreus Thoreson Farmhouse November 15, 1974
(#74001030)
February 13, 1991 Off CR 64
Madison Ornate 1899 Queen Anne farmhouse of a prominent settler (1832–1914). Burned down by an accidental fire in 1989.[16]
3 Yellow Bank Church Campground Bridge November 6, 1989
(#89001831)
June 30, 1998 Twp. Rd. 76 over Yellow Bank River (original location)
Current coordinates are

44°37′49″N 92°50′25″W / 44.630266°N 92.840231°W / 44.630266; -92.840231 (Yellow Bank Church Campground Bridge)
Odessa 1893 truss bridge of a unique design by the King Bridge Company.[17] Moved in 1994 to the Little Log House Pioneer Village outside Hastings, Minnesota, to complete a replica of the 1895 Hastings Spiral Bridge.[15][18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on April 12, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  3. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  4. ^ Mitchell, Diana (1973-01-25). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form: Camp Release Site". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-02-05.
  5. ^ Nelson, Charles W. (February 1981). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Commercial Bank Building". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-02-05.
  6. ^ Granger, Susan; Kay Grossman (1995-02-15). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Dawson Armory and Community Building". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-02-05.
  7. ^ Granger, Susan (August 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Dawson Carnegie Library". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-02-05.
  8. ^ Granger, Susan (April 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Lac qui Parle County Courthouse". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-02-05.
  9. ^ Mitchell, Diana (1973-01-25). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form: Lac qui Parle Mission Site". National Park Service.
  10. ^ Anderson, Rolf T. (1991-03-25). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Lac qui Parle State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic District". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-01-29.
  11. ^ Granger, Susan (January 1985). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: District School No. 92". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-01-29.
  12. ^ Granger, Susan (September 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Madison Carnegie Library". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-01-29.
  13. ^ Granger, Susan (October 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Madison City Hall". National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-01-29.
  14. ^ "Hotel Lac qui Parle (removed)". Minnesota National Register Properties Database. Minnesota Historical Society. 2009. Retrieved 2013-08-29.
  15. ^ a b Nord, Mary Ann (2003). The National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Society. ISBN 0-87351-448-3.
  16. ^ El-Hai, Jack (2000). Lost Minnesota: Stories of Vanished Places. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 0816635153.
  17. ^ "Yellow Bank Church Campground Bridge". Minnesota's Historic Bridges. Minnesota Historical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-08. Retrieved 2012-09-22.
  18. ^ Lohry, Matthew (2010-06-10). "Yellow Bank Church Campground Bridge". Bridgehunter.com. Retrieved 2013-08-29.

External links[edit]