Ocean Parkway (BMT Brighton Line)

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 Ocean Parkway
 "Q" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
Q-OceanPlat.jpg
Station statistics
AddressOcean Parkway & Brighton Beach Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11235
BoroughBrooklyn
LocaleBrighton Beach
Coordinates40°34′35″N 73°58′07″W / 40.576252°N 73.968587°W / 40.576252; -73.968587Coordinates: 40°34′35″N 73°58′07″W / 40.576252°N 73.968587°W / 40.576252; -73.968587
DivisionB (BMT)
LineBMT Brighton Line
Services      Q all times (all times)
Transit connectionsBus transport New York City Bus: B1, B68
StructureElevated
Platforms2 island platforms
Tracks4 (2 in regular service)
Other information
OpenedApril 22, 1917; 102 years ago (1917-04-22)
Station code056[1]
Traffic
Passengers (2017)1,022,378[2]Increase 0.6%
Rank358 out of 425
Station succession
Next northBrighton Beach (local): Q all times
Brighton Beach (express): no regular service
Next southWest Eighth Street–New York Aquarium: Q all times
Ocean Parkway Station (Dual System BRT)
MPSNew York City Subway System MPS
NRHP reference #05000749[3]
Added to NRHPJuly 29, 2005

Ocean Parkway is an express station on the New York City Subway's BMT Brighton Line. Located at Brighton Beach Avenue and Ocean Parkway in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, it is served by the Q train at all times.[4]

History[edit]

Southern stair

When the Ocean Parkway station opened on April 22, 1917, it was served only by a single-track shuttle that ran to Brighton Beach, which was the southern terminal for all trains on the Brighton Line.

When West Eighth Street–New York Aquarium opened in 1919, all four tracks were extended west to serve the two-level station. The local tracks remained level and connected to the lower level (which was also served by the IND Culver Line) while the express tracks rose up and connected to the upper level. As a result, all Brighton Line train service was extended to Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue.

A reconfiguration in 1954 resulted in the discontinuation of Brighton Line service on the lower level of West Eighth Street, as well as express service at Ocean Parkway. West of this station, the local tracks merge into the express tracks, which continue to serve the upper level of West Eighth Street. The structures connecting the Brighton Line to the lower level, which the Culver Line continues to serve, remain intact, but are trackless.

Station layout[edit]

Track layout
End of layup tracks
from Brighton Beach
Unused trackways
to W 8 St lower level
to W 8 St upper level
Northern stair
P
Platform level
Southbound local "Q" train toward Stillwell Avenue (West 8th Street)
Island platform, doors will open on the left
Southbound express No regular service
Northbound express No regular service
Island platform, doors will open on the left
Northbound local "Q" train toward 96th Street (Brighton Beach)
M Mezzanine to entrances/exits, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
G Street Level Entrances/Exits

This elevated station has two island platforms and four tracks with the center express tracks not normally used.[5] It is built on a decorated masonry viaduct to keep with Ocean Parkway's status as a city parkway. Both platforms have red canopies with black frames and support columns along their entire length except for a section at their east (railroad north) end.

The station is geographically the closest Brighton Line station to the Brighton and Coney Island beaches, with the beachfront located roughly 500 feet (150 m) away from the station.

The 1996 artwork here is called Coney Island Reliefs by Deborah Masters. It was installed in 2009 and consists of 128 reliefs on the station's concrete structure.

Between this station and Brighton Beach, two layup tracks begin at bumper blocks adjacent to the platforms and run between the local and express tracks, making this section the only six-track elevated structure in the subway system. The two tracks merge with either adjacent track on approach to Brighton Beach.[5]

Exits[edit]

This station has two entrances/exits, both of which are elevated station houses beneath the tracks and platforms.

  • The full-time one is at the east end. A single staircase from each platform goes down to a waiting area/crossunder, where a turnstile bank provides entrance/exit from the station. Outside fare control, there is a token booth and two staircases going down to each eastern corner of Brighton Beach Avenue and Ocean Parkway.[6]
  • The other station house at the west end also has one staircase from each platform, a waiting area/crossunder, and two staircases facing in opposite directions and going down to the northwest corner of Brighton Beach Avenue and Ocean Parkway. However, it is un-staffed, containing two High Entry/Exit Turnstiles.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  2. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2012–2017". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 12, 2018. Retrieved July 12, 2018.
  3. ^ "NPS Focus". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved December 12, 2011.
  4. ^ "Q Subway Timetable, Effective June 24, 2018" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  5. ^ a b Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  6. ^ a b "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Sheepshead Bay" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved 2 August 2015.

External links[edit]