Ohn no khao swè

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ohn no khao swè
Ohn No Khao Swe at Sapphire Asian Cuisine (10988302274).jpg
Alternative names
  • ohn no khauk swe
  • on no khauk swe
  • ohn no khauk sway
  • ohn no khau sway
  • ohn no khau swe
TypeNoodle soup
Course
  • Breakfast
  • Brunch
Place of originMyanmar (Burma)
Associated national cuisineBurmese cuisine
Main ingredientsWheat egg noodles, curried chicken in coconut milk broth, hard boiled egg, crisp noodles, sliced onions, chili
VariationsKhow suey
Similar dishesLaksa, Khao soi

Ohn no khao swè (Burmese: အုန်းနို့ခေါက်ဆွဲ; MLCTS: un: nui. hkauk hcwai:; IPA: [ʔóʊɴ no̰ kʰaʊʔ sʰwɛ́]) is a Burmese dish consisting of wheat noodles in a curried chicken and coconut milk broth thickened with gram flour (chickpea flour).[1] The dish is often garnished with crisp fried bean fritters, sliced raw onions, chillies, crisp noodles, and slices of hard-boiled egg, and zested with lime or lemon juice and fish sauce.[2]

Due to the popular link between coconut milk and hypertension, a variation which uses evaporated milk instead of coconut milk is also available in certain restaurants. The rest of the ingredients are the same. A dry noodle form of this dish, called shwedaung khao swe (ရွှေတောင်ခေါက်ဆွဲ), consists of egg noodles tossed in a chicken curry cooked in coconut milk gravy.[3]

Ohn no khao swè resembles other coconut milk based noodle soups in Southeast Asia, including the Malaysian laksa, and the khao soi of Chiang Mai and Luang Prabang. The Indian khow suey and Pakistani khausa descend from the Burmese ohn no khao swè, likely coinciding with the mass exodus of Burmese Indians in the 1960s back to South Asia, and remains a popular dish in Eastern India.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Amanda Hesser. "Coconut Noodles Recipe". NYT Cooking. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  2. ^ Tan, Desmond; Leahy, Kate (2017-03-28). Burma Superstar: Addictive Recipes from the Crossroads of Southeast Asia [A Cookbook]. Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale. ISBN 9781607749516.
  3. ^ "Myanmar's Shwe Taung Khauk Swei (Shwe Taung Noodle)". www.sapa-tours-trek.com. Retrieved 2019-10-31.
  4. ^ Staff, W. S. J. (2013-01-20). "How to Make Khao Suey". WSJ. Retrieved 2019-10-31.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]