Oscar Lapham

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Oscar Lapham
Oscar Lapham (Rhode Island Congressman).jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's 1st district
In office
March 4, 1891 – March 3, 1895
Preceded byHenry J. Spooner
Succeeded byMelville Bull
Member of the Rhode Island Senate
In office
1887–1889
Personal details
Born(1837-06-29)June 29, 1837
Burrillville,
Rhode Island
DiedMarch 29, 1926(1926-03-29) (aged 88)
Providence,
Providence County,
Rhode Island, U.S.
Resting placeSwan Point Cemetery
Providence, Rhode Island
CitizenshipUS
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Claira L. Lapham
ChildrenAnnie Lapham
ParentsDuty Lapham
Lucinda (Wheelock) Lapham
Alma materSmithville Seminary
Pembroke Academy
Brown University
ProfessionLawyer
Politician

Oscar Lapham (June 29, 1837 – March 29, 1926) was an American lawyer and politician from the U.S. state of Rhode Island. He served as a member of the Rhode Island Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

Early life[edit]

Lapham was born in Burrillville, Rhode Island and attended the Smithville Seminary in Scituate, Rhode Island, Pembroke Academy in Pembroke, New Hampshire and the University Grammar School in Providence, Rhode Island.[1] In 1864, he graduated from Brown University.[2] At Brown, he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Delta Kappa Epsilon.[3][4] Lapham studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He began the practice of law in Providence.[5]

Career[edit]

During the American Civil War, he served as first lieutenant, adjutant and captain in the Twelfth Rhode Island Volunteers.[6] After the war, he was elected as a companion of the Massachusetts Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States.

He was a member of the Rhode Island Senate in 1887 and 1888, and served as chairman of the Judiciary Committee.[7] He was treasurer of the Rhode Island Democratic Committee from 1887-1891.[8]

Lapham was an unsuccessful candidate for election to the Forty-eighth, Fiftieth, and Fifty-first Congresses. He was elected as a Democratic candidate to the Fifty-second and Fifty-third Congresses, serving from March 4, 1891 to March 3, 1895.[9] He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1894 to the Fifty-fourth Congress.

After leaving Congress, he resumed the practice of law in Providence. He served on the board of trustees and on the executive committee for his alma mater Brown University.[10] He was a member of the Providence Board of Trade.[11]

He died on March 29, 1926 in Providence and is interred in the Swan Point Cemetery there.[12]

Family life[edit]

Lapham was the son of Duty Lapham and Lucinda (Wheelock) Lapham. He married Claira L. Paine on June 20, 1876,[13] and their only child Annie died in infancy.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States Congressional serial set, Issue 3145. 1893. p. 103.
  2. ^ Brown University and, Koopman, Harry Lyman (1894). Address Book of the Living Graduates [for] 1894-1901. Brown University. p. 13.
  3. ^ Phi Beta Kappa and, Parsons, Eben Burt (1900). Phi Beta Kappa Hand-book and General Address Catalogue of the United Chapters. Walden & Crawley. p. 51.
  4. ^ Delta Kappa Epsilon (1900). Catalogue of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Council publishing company. p. 109.
  5. ^ Ballou, Adin (1888). An Elaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous in America. Press of E. L. Freeman & son. p. 676.
  6. ^ J.H. Beers & Company (1908). Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island: Genealogical Records and Historical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens and of Many of the Old Families. J.H. Beers & Company. p. 462.
  7. ^ United States Congressional serial set, Issue 3145. 1893. p. 103.
  8. ^ Secretary of State (1891). Official Manual of the State of Missouri. Secretary of State. p. 209.
  9. ^ United States Congressional serial set, Issue 3145. 1893. p. 103.
  10. ^ Brown University (1900). Annual Report of the President to the Corporation of Brown University. Brown University. p. 53.
  11. ^ Report of the Annual Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration. 1906. p. 114.
  12. ^ Spencer, Thomas (1998). Where They're Buried: A Directory Containing More Than Twenty Thousand Names of Notable Persons Buried in American Cemeteries, with Listings of Many Prominent People who Were Cremated. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 297.
  13. ^ Ballou, Adin (1888). An Elaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous in America. Press of E. L. Freeman & son. p. 676.
  14. ^ J.H. Beers & Company (1908). Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island: Genealogical Records and Historical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens and of Many of the Old Families. J.H. Beers & Company. p. 462.

External links[edit]


U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Henry J. Spooner
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's 1st congressional district

1891 – 1895
Succeeded by
Melville Bull

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.