Panchamrita

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Panchamrita (lit. five Amṛtas in Sanskrit) is a mixture of five foods used in Hindu worship and puja[1] which are usually honey, liquid jaggery, cow milk, yogurt and ghee.

Preparation[edit]

Cow Milk, curd, honey, liquid jaggery, and ghee are mixed together. However, there may be certain regional variations in ingredients. Most south Indians add ripe banana[2] as well. Panchamrita is an Ayurvedic preparation but has been manipulated in several places to cut costs and increase keeping value.[citation needed]

  पयोदधि घृतं चैव मधु च शर्करायुतं ।
  पञ्चामृतं मयानीतं स्नानार्थं प्रतिगृह्यताम् ॥

Some people use sugar instead of jaggery, which is not accepted by all, as sugar is not a natural element like jaggery and sugar is sometimes refined using bone charcoal which makes it inappropriate to use for pooja.[citation needed]

In Palani Murugan temple, Tamil Nadu, Panchamrita is used in abisheka and distributed as prasad. This panchamirtam consist of banana, sugar, ghee, honey, seedless dates, cardamom and sugar candy.[3] The banana used is the Virupatchi variety, which grows only in the Palani hills and has very low water content.[4]

Keralites may also include tender coconut. Some recipes also include grapes.[5]

Usage[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ For definition of पञ्चामृत (IAST: pañcāmṛta ) as "the collection of five sweet things used in worshipping deities" see: Apte 1965, p. 578,
  2. ^ Karigoudar, Ishwaran (1977). A populistic community and modernization in India. Books.google.com. ISBN 9004047905. Retrieved 23 May 2009.
  3. ^ http://www.palanimurugantemple.tnhrce.in/facilities/panchamirtham.html
  4. ^ "Palani temple to double panchamirtham production". Economic Times. Palani, India. 6 October 2009.
  5. ^ Nair, K.K. (26 March 2007). Sages Through Ages, Proof of divinity given. Books.google.com. ISBN 9781418446895. Retrieved 23 May 2009.
  6. ^ Millett, Deacon (2013). Hoodoo Honey and Sugar Spells: Sweet Love Magic in the Conjure Tradition. Lucky Mojo Curio Co. ISBN 978-0-9719612-4-1.
  • Apte, Vaman Shivram (1965), The Practical Sanskrit Dictionary (Fourth revised and enlarged ed.), Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishers, ISBN 81-208-0567-4