Pava'ia'i, American Samoa

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Pava'ia'i
Village
Country United States
Territory American Samoa
CountyTuālāuta
Area
 • Land0.73 sq mi (1.89 km2)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total2,450
ZIP code
96799

Pava'ia'i is a village in the Western District of Tutuila Island in American Samoa. It borders Mapasagafou and Faleniu to the north, 'Ili'ili to the east, Futiga to the south, and Malaeloa to the west.[1] It is located in Tuālāuta County.

History[edit]

In early 1942, the main body of the U.S. Marines arrived in American Samoa. The construction of quarters at Utulei was incomplete, as was Camp Samuel Nicholas in Faga'alu. Some of the Marines of the 2nd Division were therefore moved into the village of Pava'ia'i. A soldier later wrote about his experience in the village: “We found the Samoan people to be exceptionally clean people… The residents… were gracious and attempted to do everything possible to make the presence of the Marines pleasant.”[2]

In July 1974, a village fire destroyed the Haleck's West Building, which included Haleck's Island Motors, Video Samoa, Intercontinental Trading Company, and J & J World Travel. There was a quick replacement of the compound with new facilities in the early 1980s.[3]

In 2005, government employees digging an area in Pavaiai village uncovered the remains of an ancient village 6.4 feet (2 m) below the surface. The senior archeologist for the American Samoa Power Authority, David Addison, told reporters that the artifacts are estimated to be between 1500 and 2000 year-old.[4]

Demographics[edit]

Population growth[5]
2010 2,450
2000 2,200
1990 1,692
1980 1,031
1970 638
1960 492
1950 342
1940 203
1930 140

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Census Bureau (2000). Census of population and housing (2000): American Samoa Summary Social, Economic, and Housing Characteristics. DIANE Publishing. Page: F-4. ISBN 9781428985490.
  2. ^ Kennedy, Joseph (2009). The Tropical Frontier: America’s South Sea Colony. University of Hawaii Press. Page 209. ISBN 9780980033151.
  3. ^ Sunia, Fofo I.F. (2009). A History of American Samoa. Amerika Samoa Humanities Council. Pages 335-336. ISBN 9781573062992.
  4. ^ http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/pacific-news/159428/artefacts-from-american-samoa-excavation-provide-snapshot-of-ancient-polynesia
  5. ^ "American Samoa Statistical Yearbook 2016" (PDF). American Samoa Department of Commerce.

Coordinates: 14°20′10″S 170°45′07″W / 14.336°S 170.752°W / -14.336; -170.752