Peter Diamondstone

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Peter Diamondstone
Personal details
Born
Peter Isaac Diamondstone

(1934-12-19)December 19, 1934
The Bronx, New York City, New York
DiedAugust 30, 2017(2017-08-30) (aged 82)
Dummerston, Vermont
Political partyLiberty Union (1970–2017)
Other political
affiliations
Socialist (2010)
Democratic (1970, 1974, 1990, 2000)
Republican (1972, 1998)
Organic Life (2000)
Progressive (2002, 2004)[1]
Spouse(s)Doris Lake (m. 1957–2017)
Children4[2]
ResidenceBrattleboro, Vermont
Alma materUniversity of Chicago
ProfessionLawyer, politician
Known forPolitical activist, Co-founder of Liberty Union Party

Peter Isaac Diamondstone (December 19, 1934 – August 30, 2017)[3] was an American lawyer and politician from the U.S. state of Vermont, best known as a perennial candidate and co-founder of the Liberty Union Party. He ran for various Vermont political offices, all unsuccessfully, in every election cycle from 1970 until 2016.[4]

Early life[edit]

Diamondstone was born in the New York borough of The Bronx in 1934 and raised in the borough of Queens. His father was a dentist and a socialist.[5] In 1944, Diamondstone got a job passing out flyers for the fourth presidential campaign of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He received a law degree from the University of Chicago in 1960 and moved to Vermont in 1968, and soon began his involvement in politics there.[3][5]

Career[edit]

Diamondstone, along with former U.S. Congressman William H. Meyer, Bernie Sanders (who is a current U.S. Senator), and others, founded the Liberty Union Party in 1970.[6] From then until his death, he ran every two years for various political offices, never receiving more than 8% of the vote in general elections.[3]

Diamondstone arrived late to a debate for U.S. Congress in 1980, and was told he would not be able to participate. He remained in the debate area and was arrested.[5] He was also arrested in 1996 while attempting to participate in a debate for U.S. Congress, for which he was a candidate. He participated in a 2014 debate for governor of Vermont, along with all six other candidates.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Diamondstone and his wife, Doris Lake, had four children: Aaron, Jessy, Ian, and Paula, 14 grandchildren, and 3 great grandchildren.[2] He was an atheist.[7]

Peter Diamondstone died on August 30, 2017, at age 82. According to his wife of sixty years, he was suffering from several aliments, including heart and kidney diseases, and had been recently released from the hospital.[8][9] Upon his death, Bernie Sanders said, "I first met Peter Diamondstone over 45 years ago. While I have not had any real contact with him for many, many years, I have the feeling that he never changed. Peter was a very independent thinker, unafraid to express his (often controversial) point of view on any subject. As a result, he forced people to examine and defend their own positions. No small thing. In his own way, Peter played an important role in Vermont politics for many decades."[10]

Electoral history[edit]

Scattering votes are not included.

1970s[edit]

Vermont Attorney General Democratic primary, 1970[11]

Vermont Attorney General election, 1970[12]

Vermont Attorney General Republican primary, 1972[13]

  • Kimberly B. Cheney (R) – 20,307 (33.62%)
  • Natt L. Divoll (R) – 18,300 (30.30%)
  • Robert E. West (R) – 13,095 (21.68%)
  • Sten E. Lium (R) – 5,009 (8.29%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (R) – 3,669 (6.07%)

Vermont Attorney General election, 1972[14]

  • Kimberly B. Cheney (R) – 101,480 (57.89%)
  • Richard Gadbois (D) – 67,884 (38.72%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 5,989 (3.36%)

Vermont's at-large congressional district Democratic primary, 1974[15]

  • Francis J. Cain (D) – 9,415 (41.37%)
  • Margaret A. Lucenti (D) – 3,384 (14.87%)
  • John J. Welch (D) – 3,004 (13.20%)
  • Francis J. Esposito (D) – 2,804 (12.32%)
  • Dennis J. Morrisseau (D) – 2,623 (11.52%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (D) – 1,426 (6.27%)

Vermont Attorney General election, 1976[16]

  • M. Jerome Diamond (D) – 89,839 (53.17%)
  • John P. Meaker (R) – 71,960 (42.59%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 7,153 (4.23%)

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1978[17]

  • Jim Jeffords (R) – 90,668 (75.26%)
  • Sarah Marie Dietz (D) – 23,228 (19.28%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 6,505 (5.40%)

1980s[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1980[18]

  • Jim Jeffords (R) – 154,274 (79.24%)
  • Robin Lloyd (Citizens) – 24,758 (12.72%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 15,218 (7.82%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1982[19]

  • Jim Jeffords (R) – 114,191 (69.23%)
  • Mark A. Kaplan (D) – 38,296 (23.22%)
  • Robin Lloyd (C) – 6,409 (3.89%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 2,794 (1.69%)
  • Morris Earle (Small is Beautiful) – 1,733 (1.05%)
  • George E. Trask (Libertarian) – 1,407 (0.85%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1984[20][21]

  • Jim Jeffords (R) – 148,025 (65.41%)
  • Anthony Pollina (D) – 60,360 (26.67%)
  • Jim Hedbor (L) – 9,359 (4.14%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 4,858 (2.15%)
  • Morris Earle (SIB) – 3,313 (1.46%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1986[22]

  • Jim Jeffords (R) – 168,403 (89.12%)
  • John T. McNulty (Pro-life) – 7,404 (3.92%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 7,060 (3.74%)
  • Morris Earle (SIB) – 5,850 (3.10%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1988[23]

  • Peter Plympton Smith (R) – 98,937 (41.21%)
  • Bernie Sanders (Independent) – 90,026 (37.50%)
  • Paul N. Poirier (D) – 45,330 (18.88%)
  • Jim Hedbor (L) – 3,109 (1.30%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 1,455 (0.61%)
  • Morris Earle (SIB) – 1,070 (0.45%)

1990s[edit]

Vermont's at-large congressional district Democratic primary, 1990[24]

  • Dolores Sandoval (D) – 5,979 (41.27%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (D) – 5,711 (39.42%)
  • Bernie Sanders (write–in, D) – 2,005 (13.84%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1990[25]

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1992[26]

  • Bernie Sanders (I) – 162,724 (57.78%)
  • Tim Philbin (R) – 86,901 (30.86%)
  • Lewis E. Young (D) – 22,279 (7.91%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 3,660 (1.30%)
  • John Dewey (Natural Law) – 3,549 (1.26%)
  • Douglas M. Miller (Freedom for LaRouche) – 2,049 (0.73%)

Vermont Attorney General election, 1994[27]

  • Jeffrey Amestoy (R) – 176,857 (87.14%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 11,210 (5.52%)
  • Joseph P. Mulcahy (NL) – 7,753 (3.73%)
  • Ted Talcott (Vermont Grassroots) – 7,062 (3.48%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1996[28]

  • Bernie Sanders (I) – 140,678 (55.23%)
  • Susan W. Sweetser (R) – 83,021 (32.60%)
  • Jack Long (D) – 23,830 (9.36%)
  • Thomas J. Morse (L) – 2,693 (1.06%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 1,965 (0.77%)
  • Robert Melamede (VG) – 1,350 (0.53%)
  • Norio Kushi (NL) – 812 (0.32%)

Vermont's at-large congressional district Democratic primary, 1998[29]

  • Bernie Sanders (write-in, D) – 1,661 (47.88%)
  • Mark Candon (write–in, D) – 524 (15.11%)
  • Jack Long (write–in, D) – 465 (13.40%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (write–in, D) – 352 (10.15%)

Vermont's at-large congressional district Republican primary, 1998[30]

  • Mark Candon (R) – 23,101 (48.43%)
  • Jack Long (R) – 15,716 (32.95%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (R) – 8,327 (17.46%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1998[31]

  • Bernie Sanders (I) – 136,403 (63.40%)
  • Mark Candon (R) – 70,740 (32.88%)
  • Matthew S. Mulligan (VG) – 3,464 (1.61%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 2,153 (1.00%)
  • Robert Maynard (L) – 2,097 (0.98%)

2000s[edit]

Vermont's at-large congressional district Democratic primary, 2000[32]

  • Peter Diamondstone (D) – 20,539 (90.94%)
  • Bernie Sanders (write–in, D) – 1,337 (5.92%)

U.S. House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2000[33]

  • Bernie Sanders (I) – 196,118 (69.21%)
  • Karen Ann Kerin (R) – 51,977 (18.34%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU, D, Organic Life) – 14,918 (5.27%)
  • Stewart Skrill (I) – 11,816 (4.17%)
  • Jack Rogers (VG) – 4,799 (1.69%)
  • Daniel H. Krymkowski (L) – 2,978 (1.05%)

Governor of Vermont Progressive primary, 2002[34]

  • Michael J. Badamo (Progressive) – 931 (54.16%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (P) – 412 (23.97%)

Vermont gubernatorial election, 2002[35]

  • Jim Douglas (R) – 103,436 (44.94%)
  • Doug Racine (D) – 97,565 (42.39%)
  • Cornelius Hogan (I) – 22,353 (9.71%)
  • Cris Ericson (Marijuana) – 1,737 (0.76)
  • Michael Badamo (P) – 1,380 (0.60%)
  • Joel W. Williams (L) – 938 (0.41%)
  • Patricia Hejny (VG) – 771 (0.34%)
  • Marilynn Christian (Restore Justice-Freedom) – 638 (0.28%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 625 (0.27%)
  • Brian Pearl (I) – 569 (0.25%)

Governor of Vermont Progressive primary, 2004[36]

  • Martha Abbott (write–in, P) – 375 (55.07%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (P) – 190 (27.90%)

Vermont gubernatorial election, 2004[37]

  • Jim Douglas (R) – 181,540 (58.74%)
  • Peter Clavelle (D) – 117,327 (37.96%)
  • Cris Ericson (M) – 4,221 (1.37%)
  • Patricia Hejny (I) – 2,431 (0.79%)
  • Harland Arthur Macia III (L) – 2,263 (0.73%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 1,298 (0.42%)

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2006[38]

Vermont gubernatorial election, 2008[39]

  • Jim Douglas (R) – 170,492 (53.43%)
  • Anthony Pollina (I) – 69,791 (21.87%)
  • Gaye Symington (D) – 69,534 (21.79%)
  • Tony O'Connor (Cheap Renewable Energy) – 3,106 (0.97%)
  • Sam Young (I) – 2,490 (0.78%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 1,710 (0.54%)
  • Cris Ericson (I) – 1,704 (0.53%)

2010s[edit]

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010[40]

  • Patrick Leahy (D) – 151,281 (64.33%)
  • Len Britton (R) – 72,699 (30.91%)
  • Daniel Freilich (I) – 3,544 (1.51%)
  • Cris Ericson (M) – 2,731 (1.16%)
  • Stephen J. Cain (I) – 2,356 (1.00%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU, Socialist) – 1,433 (0.61%)
  • Johenry Nunes (I) – 1,021 (0.43%)

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2012[41]

  • Bernie Sanders (I) – 207,848 (71.00%)
  • John MacGovern (R) – 72,898 (24.90%)
  • Cris Ericson (M) – 5,924 (2.02%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 2,511 (0.86%)
  • Peter Moss (Peace & Prosperity) – 2,452 (0.84%)
  • Laurel LaFramboise (VoteKISS) – 877 (0.30%)

Vermont gubernatorial election, 2014[42]

  • Peter Shumlin (D) – 89,509 (46.36%)
  • Scott Milne (R) – 87,075 (45.10%)
  • Dan Feliciano (L) – 8,428 (4.37%)
  • Em Peyton (I) – 3,157 (1.64%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 1,673 (0.87%)
  • Bernard Peters (I) – 1,434 (0.74%)
  • Cris Ericson (I) – 1,089 (0.56%)

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2016[43][44][45]

  • Patrick Leahy (D) – 192,243 (59.99%)
  • Scott Milne (R) – 103,637 (32.34%)
  • Cris Ericson (M) – 9,156 (2.86%)
  • Jerry Trudell (I) – 5,223 (1.63%)
  • Peter Diamondstone (LU) – 3,241 (1.01%)

References[edit]

  1. ^ While Diamondstone generally ran as a member of the Liberty Union Party, he also ran in the Democratic, Republican, and Progressive primaries for statewide office on several occasions and also as the candidate of the Socialist and Organic Life parties.
  2. ^ a b Davis, Mark (July 29, 2015). "A Former Ally Says Bernie Sanders Has Changed". Seven Days. Retrieved October 8, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Stigliani, Emilie Teresa (June 9, 2016). "Without winning, Diamondstone influenced Vt. politics". Burlington Free Press. Retrieved October 8, 2016.
  4. ^ "Candidates register to appear on ballots". The Burlington Free Press. Retrieved June 5, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c Van Susteren, Dirk (December 7, 2014). "In This State: Peter Diamondstone, Unapologetic Socialist, May Have Run His Last Campaign". VTDigger. Retrieved October 8, 2016.
  6. ^ ""L.U.P. History," The Official Website Of The Liberty Union Party - Vermont".
  7. ^ "Peter Diamondstone's Biography". Project VoteSmart. Retrieved October 8, 2016.
  8. ^ D'Ambrosio, Dan (August 31, 2017). "Longtime activist, perennial candidate Peter Diamondstone dies at 82". Burlington Free Press. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  9. ^ Kinzel, Bob (August 31, 2017). "Peter Diamondstone, Longtime Vermont Political Figure, Dies At 82". Vermont Public Radio. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  10. ^ Davis, Mark (August 31, 2017). "Dogged Leftist Candidate Peter Diamondstone Dies". Seven Days. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  11. ^ "VT Attorney General - D Primary 1970". Our Campaigns.
  12. ^ "VT Attorney General 1970". Our Campaigns.
  13. ^ "VT Attorney General - R Primary 1972". Our Campaigns.
  14. ^ "VT Attorney General 1972". Our Campaigns.
  15. ^ "VT - At-Large - D Primary 1974". Our Campaigns.
  16. ^ "VT Attorney General 1976". Our Campaigns.
  17. ^ "VT At-Large 1978". Our Campaigns.
  18. ^ "VT At-Large 1980". Our Campaigns.
  19. ^ "VT At Large 1982". Our Campaigns.
  20. ^ "VT At-Large 1984". Our Campaigns.
  21. ^ "Vermont General Election Results - U.S. Representatives" Vermont State Archives
  22. ^ "VT At-Large 1986". Our Campaigns.
  23. ^ "VT At-Large 1988". Our Campaigns.
  24. ^ "VT At-Large - D Primary 1990". Our Campaigns.
  25. ^ "VT At-Large 1990". Our Campaigns.
  26. ^ "VT At-Large 1992". Our Campaigns.
  27. ^ "VT Attorney General 1994". Our Campaigns.
  28. ^ "VT At-Large 1996". Our Campaigns.
  29. ^ "VT At-Large - D Primary 1998". Our Campaigns.
  30. ^ "VT At-Large - R Primary 1998". Our Campaigns.
  31. ^ "VT At-Large 1998". Our Campaigns.
  32. ^ "VT At-Large - D Primary 2000". Our Campaigns.
  33. ^ "VT At-Large 2000". Our Campaigns.
  34. ^ "VT Governor - PRG Primary 2002". Our Campaigns.
  35. ^ "VT - Governor 2002". Our Campaigns.
  36. ^ "VT Governor - PRG Primary 2004". Our Campaigns.
  37. ^ "VT Governor 2004". Our Campaigns.
  38. ^ "VT US Senate 2006". Our Campaigns.
  39. ^ "VT Governor 2008". Our Campaigns.
  40. ^ "VT US Senate 2010". Our Campaigns.
  41. ^ "VT US Senate 2012". Our Campaigns.
  42. ^ "VT Governor 2014". Our Campaigns.
  43. ^ "VT US Senate 2016". Our Campaigns.
  44. ^ "Vermont Election Results". Burlington Free Press.
  45. ^ "Official Results - General Election - November 8, 2016". Vermont Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 28, 2016.