Portal:Creationism

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Introduction

Creationism is the religious belief that nature, and aspects such as the universe, Earth, life, and humans, originated with supernatural acts of divine creation. In its broadest sense, creationism includes a continuum of religious views, which vary in their acceptance or rejection of scientific explanations for the origin and development of natural phenomena such as evolution.

The term creationism most often refers to belief in special creation; the claim that the universe and lifeforms were created as they exist today by divine action, and that the only true explanations are those which are compatible with a Christian fundamentalist literal interpretation of the creation myths found in the Bible's Genesis creation narrative. Since the 1970s, the commonest form of this has been young Earth creationism which posits special creation of the universe and lifeforms within the last 10,000 years on the basis of Flood geology, and promotes pseudoscientific creation science. From the 18th century onwards, old Earth creationism accepted geological time harmonized with Genesis through gap or day-age theory, while supporting anti-evolution. Modern old-Earth creationists support progressive creationism and continue to reject evolutionary explanations. Following political controversy, creation science was reformulated as intelligent design and neo-creationism.

Mainline Protestants and the Catholic Church reconcile modern science with their faith in Creation through forms of theistic evolution which hold that God purposefully created through the laws of nature, and accept evolution. Some groups call their belief evolutionary creationism.

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Selected article

Detail of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel showing the creation of stars and planets.
The Genesis creation narrative is the biblical account of the creation of the world contained in the first two chapters of the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. As a sacred narrative of the primeval history of the world (chapters 1–11), it is part of the biblical canons of Judaism and Christianity. It is a creation myth with similarities to several ancient Mesopotamian creation myths, while differing in its monotheistic outlook.

Chapter one describes the creation of the world by God (Hebrew אֱלֹהִ֔ים Elohim), by means of divine fiat in six days and the designation of the seventh day as Sabbath, a holy (set apart) day of rest. Man and woman are created to be God's regents over his creation. Chapter two tells of God creating the first man whom he forms from clay (or dust) and into whom he "breathes" the "breath of life". The first woman is formed from the side of the first man. God plants a garden "east of Eden" into which he places the first couple. Chapter two ends with a statement concerning why men and women are given into marriage.

Selected biography

James Ussher portrait by Sir Peter Lely
James Ussher (or Usher; 4 January 1581 – 21 March 1656) was the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625 and 1656. He was a prolific scholar and church leader, who today is most famous for his identification of the genuine letters of the church father, Ignatius, and for his chronology that sought to establish the time and date of the creation as "the entrance of the night preceding the 23rd day of October... the year before Christ 4004"; that is, around 6 pm on 22 October 4004 BC according to the proleptic Julian calendar.

Ussher's work is now used to support Young Earth Creationism, which holds that the universe was created thousands of years ago (rather than billions). But while calculating the date of the Creation is today considered a controversial activity, in Ussher's time such a calculation was still regarded as an important task, one previously attempted by many Post-Reformation scholars, such as Joseph Justus Scaliger and physicist Isaac Newton.

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Major topics

General Creationism | Creation myth | History of creationism | Creation according to Genesis | Allegorical interpretations of Genesis
Creation Ussher chronology | Adam and Eve | Omphalos hypothesis | Mosaic authorship of the Genesis | Documentary hypothesis | Creation myth | Great Flood | Confusion of tongues | Tower of Babel | Noah  | Anthropic principle  | Baraminology  | Flood geology
Types of creationism Creation science | Intelligent design | Islamic creationism | Modern geocentrism | Neo-creationism | Omphalos creationism | Old Earth creationism | Progressive creationism | Young Earth creationism 
Controversy Creation–evolution controversy | Creation and evolution in public education | Outline | Teach the Controversy | Kansas evolution hearings  | Edwards v. Aguillard  | Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District
Bible Christianity | Exegesis | Genealogy | Great Flood | Jesus Christ | Judaism | Nephilim | Noah's Ark | Biblical inerrancy | Original sin | Theology | Tower of Babel 

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