Ron Brownstein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ron Brownstein
RonBrownstein.png
Brownstein in 2016
Born (1958-04-06) April 6, 1958 (age 61)
EducationB.A. State University of New York at Binghamton
OccupationJournalist
Political correspondent
Analyst
Spouse(s)Nina Easton (divorced)
Eileen Nicole McMenamin (m. 2005)
Children2
Parent(s)Shirley and David Brownstein

Ronald J. Brownstein (born April 6, 1958) is an American journalist, political correspondent, and analyst.[1][2]

Early life and education[edit]

Brownstein was born to a Jewish family on April 6, 1958 in New York City,[3] the son of Shirley and David Brownstein.[4] His father was an electrician.[4] In 1979, he graduated with a B.A. in English Literature from the State University of New York - Binghamton.[3] He then worked as senior staff writer for Ralph Nader.[3]

Career[edit]

In 1983, he went to work for the National Journal as White House correspondent.[3] In 1987, he became a contributing editor for the Los Angeles Times.[3] In 1989, he left the National Journal to work full-time as national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.[3] In 1993, he was named their national political correspondent.[3] In 1997, he accepted a position as chief political correspondent for U.S. News and World Report.[3] In 1998, he went to work for CNN as a political analyst where he remained until 2004.[5] He is currently senior political analyst for CNN and Editorial Director for Strategic Partnerships for Atlantic Media.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Brownstein has been married twice. His first wife was Nina Easton; they had two children before divorcing.[6] In 2005, he married Eileen Nicole McMenamin, the former communications director for Senator John McCain, in a nondenominational ceremony in Henderson, Nevada.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ronald Brownstein on America's political and electoral fault lines".
  2. ^ "Ronald Brownstein Transcript - Conversations with Bill Kristol".
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Maisel, Louis Sandy; Forman, Ira N. (June 8, 2005). Jews in American Politics. pp. 317–318.
  4. ^ a b c "Eileen McMenamin and Ronald Brownstein". New York Times. May 5, 2005.
  5. ^ a b "Ron Brownstein - Senior Political Analyst". CNN. Retrieved February 2, 2018.
  6. ^ "Kathryn Gaskin, Taylor Brownstein". New York Times. June 19, 2016.

External links[edit]