Roy H. Thorpe

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Roy H. Thorpe
RoyHThorpe.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Nebraska's 1st district
In office
November 7, 1922 – March 4, 1923
Preceded byC. Frank Reavis
Succeeded byJohn H. Morehead
Personal details
Born(1874-12-13)December 13, 1874
Greensburg, Indiana
DiedSeptember 19, 1951(1951-09-19) (aged 76)
Lincoln, Nebraska
Political partyRepublican

Roy Henry Thorpe (December 13, 1874 – September 19, 1951) was an American Republican Party politician.

He was born near Greensburg, Indiana, on December 13, 1874, and graduated from Greensburg High School. He studied pharmacy, medicine, and law and become an evangelist. He was known as The boy tramp orator of 1896. He worked as a salesman in Du Quoin, Illinois, from 1897 to 1904 and in Shenandoah, Iowa, from 1905 to 1919.

He moved to Lincoln, Nebraska, still working as a salesman in 1919. On November 7, 1922, he was elected to the Sixty-seventh United States Congress to fill the seat left open by C. Frank Reavis who resigned to become a special war fraud prosecutor. He didn't run for reelection in 1922, but tried unsuccessfully in 1924 for the Sixty-ninth United States Congress. He traveled as a sales organizer and later engaged in the insurance business. He died in Lincoln on September 19, 1951, and is interred in Wyuka Cemetery.

References[edit]

  • "Thorpe, Roy Henry". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved February 24, 2006.
  • "Thorpe, Roy Henry". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved February 24, 2006.
  • This article incorporates facts obtained from: Lawrence Kestenbaum, The Political Graveyard
  •  This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
C. Frank Reavis (R)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Nebraska's 1st congressional district

November 7, 1922 – March 3, 1923
Succeeded by
John H. Morehead (D)