Salisbury steak

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Salisbury Steak)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Salisbury steak
Salisbury steak with brown sauce.jpg
Salisbury steak with brown sauce
CourseEntrée or main
Place of originUnited States
Created byJ. H. Salisbury
Serving temperatureHot
Main ingredientsGround beef
Ingredients generally usedVarious
Similar dishesHamburger

Salisbury steak is a dish, originating in the United States, made from a blend of ground beef and other ingredients and is usually served with gravy or brown sauce. Hamburg steak is a similar product but differs in ingredients.

History[edit]

Hamburg steak is known by the name "Frikadelle" in Germany since (at least) the 17th century.
The "Hamburger Rundstück" was popular already 1869, and is believed to be a precursor to the modern hamburger.

Prior to the popularity of minced or ground beef like Salisbury steak in the United States, similar foods already existed in the culinary tradition of Europe. The Apicius cookbook, a collection of ancient Roman recipes that may date to the early 4th century, details a preparation of beef called isicia omentata; served as a baked patty in which minced or chopped beef is mixed with pine kernels, black and green peppercorns, and white wine, isicia omentata may be the earliest precursor to the hamburger.[1] In the 12th century, the nomadic Mongols carried food made of several varieties of milk (kumis) and meat (horse or camel).[2] During the life of their leader Genghis Khan (1167–1227), the Mongol army occupied the western portions of the modern-day nations of Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan,[3] forming the so-called Golden Horde. This cavalry dominated army was fast moving and sometimes unable to stop for a meal, so they often ate while riding. They wrapped a few slices of meat under their saddles so it would crumble under pressure and motion and be cooked by heat and friction. This recipe for minced meat spread throughout the Mongol Empire until its split in the 1240s.[4] It was common for Mongol armies to follow different groups of animals (such as herds of horses or oxen or flocks of sheep) that provided the necessary protein for the warriors' diets.[2] Marco Polo also recorded descriptions of the culinary customs of the Mongol warriors, indicating that the flesh of a single pony could provide one day's sustenance for 100 warriors.

When Genghis Khan's grandson Kublai Khan (1215–1294) invaded Moscow, he and his warriors introduced minced horsemeat to the Muscovites. This was later called steak tartare.[2] The city states of what is now Germany took to this ground meat product and created many of their own dishes by adding capers, onions and even caviar to the blend and selling it on the streets.[5] One of the oldest references to a Hamburgh Sausage appeared in 1763 in the cookbook entitled Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse (1708–1770). Hamburg Sausage is made with minced meat and a variety of spices, including nutmeg, cloves, black pepper, garlic, and salt, and is typically served with toast. A wide variety of traditional European dishes are also made with minced meat, such as meatloaf,[6] the Serbian pljeskavica, the Arab kofta, and meatballs.

Hamburg and its port[edit]

The port of Hamburg in the 1890s.

Minced meat was a delicacy in medieval cuisine, red meat usually being restricted to the higher classes.[7] Very little mincing was done by medieval butchers or recorded in the cookbooks of the time, perhaps because it was not part of the sausage-making process that preserve meat. Russian ships brought recipes for steak tartare to the port of Hamburg during the 17th century,[8] a time when there was such a great presence of Russian residents there that it was nicknamed "the Russian port". Trade within the Hanseatic League between the 13th and 17th centuries made this port one of the largest in Europe, its commercial importance being further heightened as it became vital to early transatlantic voyages during the age of steam. In the period of European colonization of the Americas, immigrants to this port were a "bridge" between old European recipes and the future development of the hamburger in the United States.[9]

During the first half of the 19th century, most of the northern European emigrants who traveled to the New World embarked on their transatlantic voyages from Hamburg. The German shipping company Hamburg America Line, also known as the Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG), was involved in Atlantic transport for almost a century.[10] The company began operations in 1847 and employed many German immigrants, many of them fleeing the revolutions of 1848–9. The vast majority of settlers and emigrants from various parts of northern Europe also began voyages to the United States from Hamburg, introducing the culinary customs to state they come into.[10] New York City was the most common destination for ships traveling from Hamburg, and various restaurants in the city began offering the Hamburg-style steak in order to attract German sailors. The steak frequently appeared on the menu as a Hamburg-style American fillet,[11][12] or even beefsteak à Hambourgeoise. Early American preparations of minced beef were therefore made to fit the tastes of European immigrants, evoking memories of the port of Hamburg and the world they left behind.[10]

Hamburg steak[edit]

In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This kind of fillet was beef minced by hand, lightly salted and often smoked, and usually served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs.[13][14] The oldest document that refers to the Hamburg steak is a Delmonico's Restaurant menu from 1873 which offered customers an 11-cent plate of Hamburg steak that had been developed by American chef Charles Ranhofer (1836–1899). This price was high for the time, twice the price of a simple fillet of beef steak.[12][15] However, by the end of the century the Hamburg steak was gaining popularity because of its ease of preparation decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day.[6] Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals; the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg.[16]

The menus of many American restaurants during the 19th century included a Hamburg beefsteak that was often sold for breakfast.[17]

Coming from this history is the Salisbury steak, which is usually served with a gravy similar in texture to brown sauce. Invented by Dr. James Salisbury (1823–1905), the term Salisbury steak has been used in the United States since 1897.[18] Dr. Salisbury recommended this recipe for the treatment of alimentation (digestive problems):

Salisbury steak remains popular in the United States, where it is traditionally served with gravy and mashed potatoes or pasta.[citation needed]

U.S. standards of identity (for packaged product)[edit]

United States Department of Agriculture standards[20] for processed, packaged "Salisbury steak" require a minimum content of 65% meat, of which up to 25% can be pork, except if de-fatted beef or pork is used, the limit is 12% combined. No more than 30% may be fat. Meat byproducts are not permitted; however, beef heart meat is allowed. Extender (bread crumbs, flour, oat flakes, etc.) content is limited to 12%, except isolated soy protein at 6.8% is considered equivalent to 12% of the others. The remainder consists of seasonings, fungi or vegetables (onion, bell pepper, mushroom or the like), binders (can include egg) and liquids (such as water, milk, cream, skim milk, buttermilk, brine, vinegar etc.). The product must be fully cooked, or else labeled "Patties for Salisbury Steak".[citation needed]

The standards for hamburger[21] limit the meat to beef only, and of skeletal origin only. Salt, seasonings and vegetables in condimental proportions can be used, but liquids, binders and/or extenders preclude the use of the term "hamburger" or "burger". With these added, the product is considered "beef patties".[citation needed]

Products not made in USDA-inspected establishments are not bound by these standards and may be bound by other standards which vary from country to country.[citation needed]

Around the world[edit]

Hamburg steak is a very similar dish.

In Sweden, Pannbiff is similar to a Salisbury steak and is often made by a mix of ground pork and beef, chopped onions, salt and pepper. It is served with boiled potatoes, gravy made from cream, caramelized onions and lingonberries. It is a very traditional dish that is common in the husman cuisine.[citation needed]

Minced cutlet (котлета рубленая, kotleta rublenaya), or, since the late 19th century, simply "cutlet", is a staple of Russian cuisine. It is similar to a Salisbury steak, with the main difference being pure beef is rarely employed, usually pork or a beef-pork mixture is used. The meat is seasoned with salt and pepper, mixed with finely chopped onion (optionally fried), garlic, and a binder (eggs and breadcrumbs soaked in milk), divided into oval-shaped patties, lightly breaded and shallow-fried in a half-inch of vegetable oil. The transliterated Japanese dish, menchi katsu, is always deep-fried and heavily breaded, being essentially a mincemeat croquette, while the Russian version is always shallow-fried.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pantke, Micaela. "Antique Roman Dishes - Collection". Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science Recipe Archive. Carnegie Mellon University. Retrieved 26 September 2014.
  2. ^ a b c Turnbull, Stephen (2003). Mongol Warrior 1200–1350 (1st ed.). London: Osprey Publishing. p. 30. ISBN 1-84176-583-X.
  3. ^ Weatherford, Jack (March 2005). Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World (1st ed.). Three Rivers Press. ISBN 0-609-80964-4.
  4. ^ Morgan, David. "The Mongols" (Blackwell Publishers; Reprint edition, April 1990), ISBN 0-631-17563-6.
  5. ^ Ronald McDonald's The Complete Hamburger 1998
  6. ^ a b Farmer, Fannie Merritt (1896). Boston Cooking-School Cookbook. Gramercy (ed. 1997). ISBN 0-517-18678-0.
  7. ^ Alan Beardsworth, Teresa Keil, (1997), "Sociology on the Menu: An Invitation to the Study of Food and Society", Ed. Routledge
  8. ^ Clapp, Edwin J. (1952). The Port of Hamburg (1st ed.). Yale University Press.
  9. ^ Osborn Cummings, Richard (June 1970). The American and His Food (The Rise of urban America) (1st ed.). Ayer Co Pub. ISBN 0-405-02445-2.
  10. ^ a b c Moch, Leslie Page (2003). Moving Europeans: Migration in Western Europe Since 1650 (2nd ed.). Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-21595-1.
  11. ^ Ranhofer, Charles (1894). The Epicurean: A Complete Treatise of Analytical & Practical Studies (1st ed.). B00085H6PE.
  12. ^ a b Ozersky, Josh (2008). The Hamburger: A History (Icons of America) (1st ed.). London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-11758-2.
  13. ^ 1802, "Oxford English Dictionary"
  14. ^ Fitzgibbon, Theodora (January 1976). The Food of the Western World: An Encyclopedia of Food from North America and Europe (1st ed.). London: Random House Inc. ISBN 0-8129-0427-3.
  15. ^ Food in American History, Part 6 – Beef (Part 1): Reconstruction and Growth into the 20th Century (1865–1910), by Louis E. Grivetti, PhD, Jan L. Corlett, PhD, Bertram M. Gordon, PhD, and Cassius T. Lockett, PhD
  16. ^ Murrey, Thomas Jefferson (1887). "Eating Before Sleeping". Cookery for Invalids (PDF) (1st ed.). New York City: White Stokes & Allen. pp. 30–33. Retrieved 2013-12-24.
  17. ^ Roger M. Grace, "Old Menus Tell the History of Hamburgers", Los Angeles, CA Metropolitan New-Enterprise newspaper
  18. ^ "Salisbury steak". Merriam-Webster Online. Retrieved 2009-01-28.
  19. ^ The Relation of Alimentation and Disease By James Henry Salisbury
  20. ^ Food Standards and Labeling Policy, USDA Archived 2011-02-05 at the Wayback Machine, FSIS, September 2005, p. 165
  21. ^ Food Standards and Labeling Policy Archived 2011-02-05 at the Wayback Machine, USDA, FSIS, September 2005, p. 67