Sam Perkins

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Sam Perkins
Sam Perkins 2016 (cropped).jpg
Perkins in 2016
Personal information
Born (1961-06-14) June 14, 1961 (age 58)
Brooklyn, New York
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school
CollegeNorth Carolina (1980–1984)
NBA draft1984 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4th overall
Selected by the Dallas Mavericks
Playing career1984–2001
PositionPower forward / Center
Number41, 44, 14
Career history
19841990Dallas Mavericks
19901993Los Angeles Lakers
19931998Seattle SuperSonics
19982001Indiana Pacers
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points15,324 (11.9 ppg)
Rebounds7,666 (6.0 rpg)
Blocks933 (0.7 bpg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2018

Samuel Perkins (born June 14, 1961)[1] is an American retired professional basketball player and executive. Perkins was a three-time college All-American, was a member of the 1982 national champion North Carolina Tar Heels, and won a gold medal with the 1984 United States men's Olympic basketball team. Perkins played professionally in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for 17 seasons.

High school career[edit]

Born in Brooklyn, New York,[1] Perkins attended Samuel J. Tilden High School.[2] He later attended and graduated from Shaker High School in Latham, New York.[2][3] He was named large-school player of the year (high school) by the New York State Sportswriters Association in 1980 and was also named to the 35 Greatest Boys McDonald's All Americans team.[citation needed]

College career[edit]

Perkins attended college at the University of North Carolina and played basketball for the North Carolina Tar Heels from 1980 to 1984.[4] He was named ACC Rookie of the Year in 1981[5] and starred alongside future NBA Hall of Famers James Worthy and Michael Jordan on the Tar Heels' 1982 NCAA championship team.[5][6] A three-time All-American,[5] Perkins was the 1984 USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year.[4] Perkins finished his collegiate basketball career as the Tar Heels' all-time leader in rebounds and blocked shots and as the second-highest scorer in team history.[5] He graduated from UNC in 1984.[7] Perkins was a co-captain of the gold-medal-winning 1984 U.S. men's Olympic basketball team.[8] He was named first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference three times in his Tar Heel career.[9]

Professional career[edit]

Chosen by the Dallas Mavericks as the fourth overall pick in the 1984 NBA draft,[4] Perkins went on to play as a power forward and center in the NBA from 1984 to 2001.[10] He was named to the NBA All-Rookie First Team in 1985.[11] Perkins played for the Dallas Mavericks, Los Angeles Lakers, Seattle SuperSonics, and Indiana Pacers, respectively.[12] He scored a career-high 45 points on April 12, 1990.[citation needed] Perkins tied an NBA record on January 15, 1997, by making eight three-pointers without a miss.[13] He appeared in three NBA Finals: The 1991 NBA Finals (with the Lakers),[14] the 1996 NBA Finals (with the SuperSonics),[14] and the 2000 NBA Finals (with the Pacers).[15] In game one of the 1991 NBA Finals, Perkins made a game-winning three-point shot to defeat the Chicago Bulls.[1] He was known by the nicknames "Sleepy Sam", "Big Smooth",[16][10] and "The Big Easy".[1]

Post-retirement activities[edit]

In 2002, Perkins was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the fifty greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.[17]

In 2008, Perkins was named vice president of player relations for the Indiana Pacers.[18] That September, he was inducted into the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame.[19] Perkins held his position with the Pacers until 2010.[20]

In 2011, Perkins traveled to South Sudan as a SportsUnited Sports Envoy for the U.S. Department of State. In this capacity, he worked with Dikembe Mutombo to lead a series of basketball clinics and team-building exercises with 50 youth and 36 coaches. This helped contribute to the State Department's mission to remove barriers and create a world in which individuals with disabilities enjoy dignity and full inclusion in society.[21]

Perkins was named to the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame in 2018.[5]

Perkins at his camp in 2019

Perkins runs a summer camp for Chapel Hill, North Carolina youth that focuses on developing the basic skills of basketball.[22]

Personal[edit]

Perkins is a Jehovah's Witness. During his professional career, he did not stand for the national anthem due to his faith.[23]

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1984–85 Dallas 82 42 28.3 .471 .250 .820 7.4 1.6 .8 .8 11.0
1985–86 Dallas 80 79 32.8 .503 .333 .814 8.6 1.9 .9 1.2 15.4
1986–87 Dallas 80 80 33.6 .482 .352 .828 7.7 1.8 1.4 1.0 14.8
1987–88 Dallas 75 75 33.3 .450 .167 .822 8.0 1.6 1.0 .7 14.2
1988–89 Dallas 78 77 36.7 .464 .184 .833 8.8 1.6 1.0 1.2 15.0
1989–90 Dallas 76 70 35.1 .493 .214 .778 7.5 2.3 1.2 .8 15.9
1990–91 L.A. Lakers 76 66 34.3 .495 .281 .821 7.4 1.5 .9 1.1 13.5
1991–92 L.A. Lakers 63 63 37.0 .450 .217 .817 8.8 2.2 1.0 1.0 16.5
1992–93 L.A. Lakers 49 49 32.4 .459 .172 .829 7.7 2.6 .8 1.0 13.7
1992–93 Seattle 30 13 25.4 .511 .452 .795 4.8 .9 .7 1.0 12.1
1993–94 Seattle 81 41 26.8 .438 .367 .801 4.5 1.4 .8 4 12.3
1994–95 Seattle 82 37 28.7 .466 .397 .799 4.9 1.6 .9 .5 12.7
1995–96 Seattle 82 20 26.5 .408 .355 .793 4.5 1.5 1.0 .6 11.8
1996–97 Seattle 81 4 24.4 .439 .395 .817 3.7 1.3 .9 .6 11.0
1997–98 Seattle 81 0 20.7 .416 .392 .789 3.1 1.4 .8 .4 7.2
1998–99 Indiana 48 0 16.4 .400 .389 .717 2.9 .5 .3 .3 5.0
1999–00 Indiana 81 0 20.0 .417 .408 .825 3.6 .8 .4 .4 6.6
2000–01 Indiana 64 41 15.6 .381 .345 .842 2.6 .6 .5 .3 3.8
Career 1,286 757 28.5 .459 .362 .811 6.0 1.5 .9 .7 11.9

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1985 Dallas 4 4 42.3 .490 .250 .765 12.8 2.8 .5 .3 18.8
1986 Dallas 10 10 34.7 .429 .250 .767 8.3 2.4 .9 1.4 14.9
1987 Dallas 4 4 17.0 .500 .000 .696 8.5 1.3 1.0 .3 17.0
1988 Dallas 17 17 33.6 .451 .143 .803 6.6 1.8 1.5 1.0 13.5
1990 Dallas 3 3 39.3 .444 .000 .765 7.3 2.7 1.0 .7 15.0
1991 L.A. Lakers 19 19 39.6 .548 .367 .761 8.3 1.7 .8 1.4 17.7
1993 Seattle 19 17 32.9 .436 .380 .873 7.0 1.9 1.0 1.3 14.4
1994 Seattle 5 0 28.2 .333 .429 .882 7.2 .8 .8 .4 9.8
1995 Seattle 4 1 35.3 .438 .455 1.000 7.8 3.3 .8 1.3 13.5
1996 Seattle 21 1 31.1 .459 .368 .754 4.3 1.7 .7 .3 12.3
1997 Seattle 12 6 28.3 .337 .311 .862 4.4 1.3 1.0 1.0 8.4
1998 Seattle 10 1 21.0 .381 .417 .600 3.2 1.4 .3 .5 5.4
1999 Indiana 13 0 11.2 .514 .458 .667 1.9 .5 .0 .2 4.1
2000 Indiana 23 0 18.1 .324 .348 .905 3.2 .4 .2 .3 4.8
2001 Indiana 3 0 6.3 .250 .250 1.3 .0 .0 .0 1.7
Career 167 83 28.7 .444 .363 .785 5.6 1.5 .7 .8 11.1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Sam Perkins - All Things Lakers - Los Angeles Times". projects.latimes.com.
  2. ^ a b Kirkpatrick, Curry. "A TOWERING TWOSOME". Vault.
  3. ^ Franchuk, Jason (20 December 2015). "Ballston Spa native Scott Cherry finds coaching home at High Point". Times Union.
  4. ^ a b c "The great Sam Perkins is giving back in Chapel Hill". ABC11 Raleigh-Durham. June 30, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e Sargent, Mike. "Sam Perkins, former UNC great, elected to collegiate basketball hall of fame". newsobserver.
  6. ^ "Sports - Easy Does It -- Sam Perkins: Selfless, Sacrificial Sonic - Seattle Times Newspaper". community.seattletimes.nwsource.com.
  7. ^ By. "Black alumni group calls for boycott of UNC fundraising campaign". newsobserver.
  8. ^ "Former Maverick Sam Perkins says NBA players united". star-telegram.
  9. ^ "Perkins to enter collegiate basketball Hall of Fame Sunday". GoHeels.com. November 18, 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Basketball great Sam Perkins touts Fox as best for council". Brooklyn Eagle. 6 August 2013.
  11. ^ "Top 5 picks make up NBA All-Rookie first team". ESPN.com. 21 May 2019.
  12. ^ Raj Prashad, Diehards. "Former North Carolina star Sam Perkins becomes sixth Tar Heel elected into College Basketball Hall of Fame". daytondailynews.
  13. ^ "NBA.com: It's Spree for Three as Knicks Rout Clips". www.nba.com.
  14. ^ a b "Playoffs 2000:Big Smooth outside shot was key this season". static.espn.go.com.
  15. ^ "O'Neal and Lakers Win a Title for Tinseltown". archive.nytimes.com.
  16. ^ Horowitz, Tom. "Dallas Mavericks: 10 Best Trades in Franchise History". Bleacher Report.
  17. ^ Markus, Don. "ACC's top 50 includes eight Terps". baltimoresun.com.
  18. ^ "Perkins named V.P. of Player Relations". Indiana Pacers.
  19. ^ Mallozzi, Vincent M. "City’s Basketball Hall Welcomes 98-Year-Old Inductee", The New York Times, September 17, 2008. Accessed September 14, 2009.
  20. ^ "15 years later: Where are the 2000 Pacers now?". Indianapolis Star.
  21. ^ "Sam Perkins and Dikembe Mutombo Travel to South Sudan | Exchange Programs". exchanges.state.gov. Retrieved May 1, 2016.
  22. ^ "Sam Perkins Basketball Camp fundamentals of the game". Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  23. ^ McCallum, Jack, "Oh Say Should We Sing?" Sports Illustrated, March 25, 1996, accessed October 21, 2016.

External links[edit]