Tadahiko Shintani

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Tadahiko Shintani
Born (1946-10-09) October 9, 1946 (age 73)
Other names新谷 忠彦
Occupationlinguist

Tadahiko Shintani (Japanese: 新谷 忠彦, romanizedShintani Tadahiko, born October 1946) is a Japanese linguist and Professor Emeritus of the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, specializing in the phonology of New Caledonian languages and Southeast Asian languages.[1]

Shintani is from Ishikawa Prefecture. He graduated from Department of French Studies at Sophia University in 1970, and completed his studies at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in 1974. In 1977 he was appointed assistant professor at the Institute of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, and was promoted to associate professor in 1987 and full professor in 1995. He retired in 2011.[citation needed]

In the 1990s, he led a group of Japanese linguists researching the languages of northern Laos.[2] He is a prominent advocate of the concept of a Tai Cultural Area, which he uses to refer to the area of continental southeast Asia―including Yunnan and Guangxi in China and Assam in India―that is inhabited by ethnic groups that speak Tai languages.[3][4][5]

Selected works[edit]

  • no. 106. The Kadaw language. by Shintani Tadahiko. Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa (ILCAA), 2015
  • no. 105. The Zotung language. by Shintani Tadahiko. Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, 2015
  • no. 104. The Shanke language by Shintani Tadahiko. Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, 2015
  • no. 103. The Wadamkhong language by Shintani Tadahiko. Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa (ILCAA), 2014
  • no. 102. The Zayein language by Shintani Tadahiko. Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa (ILCAA), 2014
  • no. 101. The Riang language by Shintani Tadahiko. Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa (ILCAA), 2008
  • Linguistic research and Shan culture area, and Chicken, Poultry Resources Study Group Report No. 4 pp. 25–29 Poultry Resources Study Group · Tokyo 2005.6.14
  • Austroasiatic tone languages of the Tai Cultural Area - aroma of typhal studies of Tonal Phenomena, Shigeki Kaji ed. pp. 271 – 292 Asia-Africa Institute for Language and Culture 2005.12.14
  • Linguistic Survey of Phongxaly, Lao P.D.R. (co-edited) Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Asia-Africa Institute for Language and Culture, 234, 2001
  • Shan (Tay) phonology theory and character method, (co-authored) Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Asia-Africa Institute for Language and Culture, 112, 2000
  • Miao · Yao from the viewpoint of language, Asian studies, No. 9, 149 - 157, 1999
  • Linguistic & Anthropologologist Study on the Shan Culture Area (edited) Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Asia-Africa Institute for Language and Culture, 246, 1999
  • Basic Vocabularism of the Languages Spoken in Phongxaly, Lao P.D.R. (co-edited) Tokyo University of Foreign Studies Language and Culture Research Institute for Asia and Africa, 359, 1999
  • Golden square area - History, language and ethnicity of Shan culture area, (edited) Keigo Shosha, 326, 1998
  • Deux Textes en Langue de Gonen (Nouvelle - Caledonie) "Asia-Africa Language and Culture Studies" 46 · 47, 362 - 374, 1994

Links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SHINTANI Tadahiko L.A." Japan Science and Technology Agency. 18 April 2014. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  2. ^ Bradley, David (2007). "Languages of mainland south-east Asia". In Krauss, Michael E. (ed.). The Vanishing Languages of the Pacific Rim. Oxford University Press. p. 333. ISBN 9780199266623.
  3. ^ Daniels, Christian (2010). "Review of James C. Scott. The Art of Not Being Governed : An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia". 東南アジア研究 [Studies of Southeast Asian Languages in Europe]. 48 (2): 205–210.
  4. ^ Daniels, Christian (2013). "Introduction: Upland Peoples in the Making of History in Northern Continental Southeast Asia". Southeast Asian Studies. 2 (1): 69–94.
  5. ^ Shintani, Tadahiko (2003). "Research on the Tai cultural area". In Goudineau, Yves (ed.). Laos and Ethnic Minority Cultures: Promoting Heritage (PDF). UNESCO.