Skagit Transit

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Skagit Transit
Skagit Transit Logo.svg
Founded1993
Headquarters600 County Shop Lane, Burlington, WA 98233-9772
Service areaSkagit County, WA
Service typebus service, dial-a-bus, vanpool
Routes15 fixed-route, 12 dial-a-bus paratransit[1]
Stops505[1]
HubsSkagit Station
Fleet21 fixed-route, 17 paratransit, 40 vanpool[1]
Daily ridership1,308[1]
Websiteskagittransit.org

Skagit Transit is a public transit system in Skagit County, Washington, US. It operates 11 bus routes, as well as dial-a-ride paratransit and vanpool services across the entire county.[2] The agency was founded in 1993 and is funded by a 0.4 percent local sales tax.

History[edit]

The Skagit County public transportation benefit area, funded by a 0.2 percent sales tax, was approved by voters in Mount Vernon and Burlington in November 1992.[3] Bus service began on November 3, 1993, with a network of four routes serving the two cities and no fares.[4][5] The cities of Anacortes, La Conner, and Sedro-Wollley were annexed into the Skagit Transit service area in 1994, followed by Bayview and Concrete in 1995.[3]

Service was cut after the passage of Initiative 695 in 2000, and voters rejected a sales tax increase to support restored service.[4][5] Skagit Transit began operating inter-county routes to Island and Whatcom counties in 2005,[6] and expanded with a Mount Vernon–Everett commuter route in 2006 part-funded by Island Transit and the state government.[7][8] The agency also took ownership of the Skagit Transportation Center in Mount Vernon, which is served by Amtrak Cascades and Island Transit.[6] A 0.2 percent sales tax increase was approved by voters in the November 2008 election, allowing for expanded service.[9]

Facilities[edit]

Skagit Station[edit]

Address: 105 E. Kincaid St, Mount Vernon, WA.
Coordinates: 48°25′06.5″N 122°20′05.8″W / 48.418472°N 122.334944°W / 48.418472; -122.334944
Facilities: A multimodal station[10] serviced by Greyhound, Amtrak Cascades, Bellingham Connector, Island Connector and Everett Express which connects with Sounder commuter rail in Everett.[11]

MOA Building[edit]

Address: 600 County Shop Lane, Burlington, WA.
Coordinates: 48°28′50.3″N 122°19′54.3″W / 48.480639°N 122.331750°W / 48.480639; -122.331750
Facilities: Maintenance, Operations, Administration[12]

Fares[edit]

Skagit Transit charges a regular adult fare of $1 for local routes, with a transfer card. Reduced fare for youth passengers, senior citizens, and eligible users of a regional reduced fare permit. Commuter routes, including the County Connector, cost $2 per ride. Day passes of $2 (for local routes) and $6 (for County Connector routes) are also offered.[13]

Bus routes[edit]

A Gillig Low Floor on Route 90X, at Everett Station after the arrival of a Sounder run from Seattle.

Local routes[edit]

As of the September 2017 service change.[14]

  • Route 185 - Chuckanut Park & Ride to Bow-Edison
  • Route 195 - Chuckanut Park & Ride to Skagit Valley Casino
  • Route 202 - Skagit Station/South MV Park & Ride
  • Route 204 - Skagit Station to Skagit Valley College
  • Route 205 - Skagit Valley College to Skagit Station
  • Route 206 - South Mount Vernon
  • Route 207 - Skagit Station to Skagit Valley Hospital
  • Route 208 - Skagit Station to Cascade Mall
  • Route 300 - Cascade Mall to Sedro-Woolley
  • Route 305 - Skagit Valley College to Sedro-Woolley
  • Route 409 - 10th & Q Street to Island Hospital
  • Route 410 - Circuit of Anacortes
  • Route 513 - Skagit Station to Anacortes, via Skagit Regional Airport
  • Route 615 - La Conner to Mount Vernon
  • Route 717 - Sedro-Woolley to Concrete
  • Route 750 - Sedro-Woolley to Marblemount

Inter-county routes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Public Transportation Division (November 2008). Summary of Public Transportation — 2007 (PDF) (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  2. ^ "Skagit Transit - Routes". www.skagittransit.org. 2012-02-07. Archived from the original on February 7, 2012. Retrieved 2016-07-18.
  3. ^ a b Public Transportation and Rail Division (September 1997). Public Transportation Systems in Washington State, 1996 Summary (PDF) (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 99. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Lerman, Rachel (November 19, 2013). "Skagit Transit ridership hits high point in October". Skagit Valley Herald. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Hixson, Russell (December 28, 2013). "Skagit Transit celebrates 20 years of bus service". Skagit Valley Herald. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  6. ^ a b Public Transportation Division (August 2006). Summary of Public Transportation — 2005 (PDF) (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 131. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  7. ^ Public Transportation Division (September 2007). Summary of Public Transportation — 2006 (PDF) (Report). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 107. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  8. ^ "Direct bus service offered from Island and Skagit counties to Everett Station". South Whidbey Record. June 21, 2006. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  9. ^ Schwartz, Ralph (December 7, 2008). "Growth on transit cools, but buses remain popular". Skagit Valley Herald. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  10. ^ "Skagit Transit - Skagit Station". www.skagittransit.org. 2007-07-07. Archived from the original on July 7, 2007. Retrieved 2016-07-18.
  11. ^ "Skagit Transit - 90X Everett Connector". skat.baron-co.com. 2007-01-04. Archived from the original on January 4, 2007. Retrieved 2016-07-18.
  12. ^ "Skagit Transit - General Information". www.skagittransit.org. 2007-07-07. Archived from the original on July 7, 2007. Retrieved 2016-07-18.
  13. ^ "Skagit Transit Fares webpage". Skagit Transit. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  14. ^ "Skagit Transit Routes webpage". Skagit Transit. Retrieved September 30, 2017.

External links[edit]