Socialist and Republican group

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Socialist and Republican group
Groupe socialiste et républicain
Socialist and Republican group logo
ChamberSenate
Previous name(s)Socialist group (1959–2011)
Groupe socialiste
Socialist group, associated and attached Europe Ecology The Greens group (2011–12)
Groupe socialiste, apparentés et groupe Europe Écologie Les Verts rattaché
Socialist and associated group (2012–15)
Groupe socialiste et apparentés
Member partiesPS
DVG
PresidentPatrick Kanner
ConstituencyNord
Representation
78 / 348
IdeologySocial democracy
Websitehttp://www.senateurs-socialistes.fr/

The Socialist and Republican group (French: groupe socialiste et républicain) is a parliamentary group in the Senate including representatives of the Socialist Party (PS).

History[edit]

The first parliamentary group of socialists in the Senate of the Third Republic was formed following the 1927 senatorial elections with a total of 14 members, after the election of 2 socialists in the 1921 renewal and the 1924 renewal bringing the total to 6 senators.[1] Before the formal constitution of a group in the Senate, the elected socialists sat with the Democratic, Radical, and Radical-Socialist Left group.[2] Though initially disorganized, the senators of the group recognized themselves under the common label of "socialist".[3] Camille Reboul presided over the group from its foundation, and was later succeeded in this position by André Morizet.[1] Tensions within the group led to the dissent of seven "neo-socialists" in 1933, halving the size of the group;[2] however, the impact of this split was ultimately limited as the SFIO was able to ensure the survival of the socialist group in the Senate.[1] The group remained roughly the same in size through the end of the Third Republic, with 16 members after the renewals of both 1929 and 1932;[4][5] it subsequently adopted the appellation of the SFIO in 1934,[3] was reduced to 13 members after the 1935 renewal,[6] and rebounded to 15 senators after the 1938 renewal.[7]

During the Fourth Republic, a socialist group was formed in the Council of the Republic, with 64 seats following senatorial elections on 8 December 1946,[8] and 62 seats following senatorial elections on 7 November 1948,[9] doing better than its tripartite partners as a result of its good local implantation.[3] The group subsequently maintained 56 seats following senatorial elections on 18 May 1952,[10] 56 seats following senatorial elections on 19 June 1955,[11] and 60 seats following senatorial elections on 8 June 1958.[12]

Antoine Courrière was the first president of the socialist group in the Senate of the Fifth Republic, presiding until his death on 20 September 1974.[13] Following senatorial elections two days later,[14] Marcel Champeix was elected president of the group on 2 October.[15][16] After his defeat on 28 September 1980,[17] Champeix was replaced by André Méric, who was officially designated president of the group on 6 October; he led the group until 5 July 1988, resigning as a result of his appointment as a Secretary of State in the government,[18] and was succeeded by Claude Estier, who was elected president of the group on the same day.[19] After Estier decided not to represent himself in the 2004 renewal,[20] he was succeeded by Jean-Pierre Bel, elected by the socialists in a four-way contest on 28 September.[21][22]

Bel remained president of the group until 30 September 2011, after which he took office as president of the Senate on 1 October;[23] the left, long a minority a Senate,[3] took control of the high chamber for the first time in the history of the republic after the 2011 renewal, with the number of Europe Ecology – The Greens senators swinging from 4 to 10 and the continuation of the communist group.[24] With Bel at the perch, François Rebsamen was elected president of the group on 1 October,[25] and on 25 September, the group was reformed as the Socialist group, associated and attached Europe Ecology The Greens group (groupe socialiste, apparentés et groupe Europe Écologie Les Verts rattaché); after the formation of an independent ecologist group on 11 January 2012, the socialist faction was renamed to the socialist and associated group (groupe socialiste et apparentés).[26] After Rebsamen was appointed to the government, he left his seat in the Senate on 14 April 2014,[27] and was succeeded by Didier Guillaume the following day.[28] The left's control of the Senate was ephemeral, with the chamber decisively returning to the control of the right after the 2014 renewal.[29] Following the renaming of the UMP to as the Republicans, its associated group in the Senate was also renamed on 2 June,[30] followed soon thereafter on 10 June by the renaming of the socialist group to the Socialist and Republican group (groupe socialiste et républicain).[31] On 27 June 2017, 23 socialists left for the La République En Marche group on the day of its foundation.[32] After the retirement of Guillaume from politics, Patrick Kanner was elected president of the group with 47 votes, against Laurence Rossignol with 25 votes, on 23 January 2018.[33]

List of presidents[edit]

Name Term start Term end Notes
Antoine Courrière 26 April 1959 20 September 1974 [34][13]
Marcel Champeix 2 October 1974 28 September 1980 [15]
André Méric 6 October 1980 5 July 1988 [18]
Claude Estier 5 July 1988 28 September 2004 [19][21][22]
Jean-Pierre Bel 28 September 2004 30 September 2011 [21][22][23]
François Rebsamen 1 October 2011 14 April 2014 [25][27]
Didier Guillaume 15 April 2014 23 January 2018 [28][33]
Patrick Kanner 23 January 2018 present [33]

Historical membership[edit]

Year Seats Change Series Notes
1959 Steady [34]
1962 Increase1 A [35]
1965 Steady B [36]
1968 Steady C [37]
1971 Decrease3 A [38]
1974 Increase3 B [14]
1977 Increase10 C [39]
1980 Increase7 A [40]
1983 Increase1 B [41]
1986 Decrease6 C [42]
1989 Increase2 A [43]
1992 Increase4 B [44]
1995 Increase5 C [45]
1998 Increase3 A [46]
2001 Increase5 B [47]
2004 Increase14 C [48]
2008 Increase19 A [49]
2011 Increase25 1 [50]
2014 Decrease29 2 [51]
2017 Decrease34 1 [52]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Fabien Conord (March 2015). "Les socialistes et les élections sénatoriales (1875–2015)" (PDF). Fondation Jean-Jaurès. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  2. ^ a b Le Béguec, Gilles (2006). "Les socialistes et le Sénat". Parlement[s], Revue d'histoire politique. 2 (6): 57–72. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Fondraz, Ludovic (2000). Les groupes parlementaires au Sénat sous la Ve République. Paris: Economica. p. 17.
  4. ^ "Feuilleton Nº 6". Sénat. 30 January 1930. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  5. ^ "Feuilleton Nº 8". Sénat. 26 January 1933. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  6. ^ "Feuilleton Nº 7". Sénat. 30 January 1936. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  7. ^ "Feuilleton Nº 6". Sénat. 26 January 1939. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  8. ^ "Composition du Conseil de la République – 8 décembre 1946" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  9. ^ "Composition du Conseil de la République – 7 novembre 1948" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  10. ^ "Composition du Conseil de la République – 18 mai 1952" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  11. ^ "Composition du Conseil de la République – 19 juin 1955" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  12. ^ "Composition du Conseil de la République – 8 juin 1958" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  13. ^ a b "Anciens sénateurs Vème République : COURRIERE Antoine". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  14. ^ a b "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1974" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  15. ^ a b "Compte rendu intégral – 1re seance" (PDF). Sénat. 2 October 1974. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  16. ^ "M. CHAMPEIX ÉLU PRÉSIDENT DU GROUPE SOCIALISTE". Le Monde. 3 October 1974. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  17. ^ "LES SÉNATEURS SOCIALISTES SONT SOUCIEUX DE L'UNITÉ DE LEUR PARTI". Le Monde. 3 October 1980. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  18. ^ a b "Anciens sénateurs Vème République : MERIC André". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  19. ^ a b "M. Claude ESTIER : Extrait de la table nominative 1988". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  20. ^ "Anciens sénateurs Vème République : ESTIER Claude". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  21. ^ a b c "Le PS estime avoir décroché sa quatrième victoire électorale de l'année 2004". Le Monde. 27 September 2004. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  22. ^ a b c "Sénat : M. Poncelet favori dans la bataille pour la présidence". Le Monde. 29 September 2004. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  23. ^ a b "TABLE NOMINATIVE 2011 – DÉBATS DU SÉNAT". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  24. ^ "Pour la première fois de son histoire, le Sénat bascule à gauche". Le Monde. 25 September 2011. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  25. ^ a b "TABLE NOMINATIVE 2011 – DÉBATS DU SÉNAT". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  26. ^ "Information sur la composition et les activités du Sénat au 31 décembre 2012". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  27. ^ a b "TABLE NOMINATIVE 2014 – DÉBATS DU SÉNAT". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  28. ^ a b "TABLE NOMINATIVE 2014 – DÉBATS DU SÉNAT". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  29. ^ Laure Equy (28 September 2014). "La droite reprend le Sénat, le FN y fait son entrée". Libération. Agence France-Presse. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  30. ^ Sébastien Tronche (11 June 2015). "Au Sénat, le groupe socialiste change de nom pour devenir le groupe socialiste et… républicain". Europe 1. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  31. ^ "Informations sur la composition et les activités du Sénat au 31 décembre 2015". Sénat. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  32. ^ "Sénat : 25 élus passent sous pavillon La République en Marche". Les Échos. 26 June 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  33. ^ a b c Tristan Quinault-Maupoil (23 January 2018). "Patrick Kanner élu président du groupe PS au Sénat". Le Figaro. Retrieved 23 January 2018.
  34. ^ a b "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1959" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  35. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1962" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  36. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1965" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  37. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1968" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  38. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1971" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  39. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1977" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  40. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1980" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  41. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1983" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  42. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1986" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  43. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1989" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  44. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1992" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  45. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1995" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  46. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 1998" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  47. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 2001" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  48. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 2004" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  49. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 2008" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  50. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 2011" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  51. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 2014" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  52. ^ "Nombre de sièges au Sénat en 2017" (PDF). Sénat. Retrieved 16 October 2017.

External links[edit]