Solar power in South Carolina

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Solar power in South Carolina is rapidly becoming competitive with grid electricity, due to the decrease in cost and the eight-year extension to the 30% federal tax credit, which can be used to install any size system.[1] South Carolina offers a 25% tax credit, meaning that 55% of the cost is covered through tax credits.[2]

South Carolina's largest solar installation was the 311 kW Grand Strand Solar Station array in Myrtle Beach, completed on April 18, 2011,[3] until December 2, 2011, when Boeing completed covering the roof of their 787 assembly building with a 2.6 MW solar array, sufficient for 20% of the building's energy use.[4][5]

Source: NREL[6]
Installed Photovoltaics[7][8][9][10][11]
Year Total (MW) Installed (MW)
2009 0.6
2010 0.9 0.3
2011 4.1 3.2
2012 4.6 0.5
2013 8.0 3.5
2014 12 4
2015 15 3

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tax Credits Extended: Renewable Energy Industry Breathes Sigh of Relief
  2. ^ Solar power picking up some heat in S.C. Archived 2012-05-29 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Solar Power
  4. ^ Boeing South Carolina to be powered by 100% renewable energy
  5. ^ SCE&G completes Boeing’s solar rooftop project
  6. ^ "PV Watts". NREL. Retrieved 23 May 2012.
  7. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 17. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-09-06. Retrieved 2012-08-16.
  8. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-11-23. Retrieved 2010-07-24.
  9. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2013-10-11.
  10. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2014). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2013" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2014-09-26.
  11. ^ South Carolina Solar

External links[edit]