Squalo-class submarine

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Squalo class submarine.jpg
Italian Squalo-class submarine (Squalo)
Class overview
Name: Squalo class
Builders: CRDA
Operators:  Regia Marina
Preceded by: Bandiera class
Succeeded by: Glauco class
Built: 1928–1930
In commission: 1930–1943
Completed: 4
Lost: 3
Scrapped: 1
General characteristics
Type: Submarine
Displacement:
  • 920 tonnes (905 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,125 tonnes (1,107 long tons) submerged
Length: 69.8 m (229 ft 0 in)
Beam: 7.21 m (23 ft 8 in)
Draft: 5.19 m (17 ft 0 in)
Installed power:
  • 3,000 bhp (2,200 kW) (diesels)
  • 1,300 hp (970 kW) (electric motors)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 15.1 knots (28.0 km/h; 17.4 mph) surfaced
  • 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 5,650 nmi (10,460 km; 6,500 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) surfaced
  • 100 nmi (190 km; 120 mi) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) submerged
Test depth: 80 m (260 ft)
Complement: 58
Armament:

The Squalo-class submarines were a group of four submarines built for the Royal Italian Navy (Regia Marina) during the 1930s. They were built at the Cantieri Riuniti dell'Adriatico (CRDA) shipyard at Monfalcone, and designed by Curio Bernardis.[1]

Design and description[edit]

The Squalo-class submarines were essentially repeats of the preceding Bandiera class. They shared that design's problems with stability and seakeeping and required the same modifications to rectify the problems. They displaced 920 metric tons (910 long tons) surfaced and 1,125 metric tons (1,107 long tons) submerged. The submarines were 69.8 meters (229 ft 0 in) long, had a beam of 7.21 meters (23 ft 8 in) and a draft of 5.19 meters (17 ft 0 in).[2]

For surface running, the boats were powered by two 1,500-brake-horsepower (1,119 kW) diesel engines, each driving one propeller shaft. When submerged each propeller was driven by a 650-horsepower (485 kW) electric motor. They could reach 15.1 knots (28.0 km/h; 17.4 mph) on the surface and 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) underwater. On the surface, the Squalo class had a range of 5,650 nautical miles (10,460 km; 6,500 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph), submerged, they had a range of 100 nmi (190 km; 120 mi) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph).[3]

The boats were armed with eight internal 53.3 cm (21.0 in) torpedo tubes, four each in the bow and stern. They carried a total of a dozen torpedoes. They were also armed with one 102 mm (4.0 in)/35 deck gun for combat on the surface. The light anti-aircraft armament consisted of one or two 13.2 mm (0.52 in) machine guns.[2]

Ships[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Early Bernardis: Squalo class". regiamarina.net. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  2. ^ a b Chesneau, p. 308
  3. ^ Bagnasco, p. 144
  4. ^ a b "Italian Submarine Casualties in World War Two". US Naval Historical Center. 15 January 2008. Retrieved 24 April 2014.

References[edit]

  • Bagnasco, Erminio (1977). Submarines of World War Two. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-962-6.
  • Chesneau, Roger, ed. (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7.
  • Rohwer, Jürgen (2005). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939-1945: The Naval History of World War Two (Third Revised ed.). Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2.

External links[edit]