Talk:Colt's Manufacturing Company

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Old rifle info[edit]

I have come into an old rifle. I has the colt horse on the left side and numbers on the underside of the stock. It is a thirty two claibar and is pump action. The grips are missing and the magazine tube cap is missing as is the magazine spring. I would like to know some history of this firearm. Any info and help would be appreciated. Thanks Bob Hapgood

Colt Lightning.--TGC55 01:51, 17 January 2006 (UTC)

Stuff[edit]

To begin with, can someone confirm the SAA was a .45? I recall it being .44-40. (Or was that the Peacemaker?) Second, mention should be made of the fact Colt's mfd about 30000 shotguns between 1878-91. Trekphiler 10:29, 12 December 2005 (UTC)

Yes, single action army is a .45. It is not the .45 ACP as in the 1911 pistol but the .45 Long Colt, an earlier, outdated round. You're probably thinking of another model of revolvers but since the SAA was so popular, there have been many rechamberings such as .357 magnum and it is quite a possibility that the .44-40 is one.

  • To be precise, the .44-40 chambered Peacemaker variants were marked "Frontier Six-Shooters". --D.E. Watters 21:56, 31 March 2006 (UTC)
Huh. Should've looked at the link page. My source got it wrong. The SAA was offered in .44-40, but standard was .45LC. Trekphiler 09:20, 13 December 2006 (UTC)
  • I don't have any sources of yet, but I've read the 44-40 chambering came after the .45 Colt chambering and was designed to be compatible with the Winchester 1873 carbine which was chambered in 44-40. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 24.205.138.69 (talk) 07:10, 24 December 2006 (UTC).
I read that too. Forgot where, but will post citation when I come across it. --TheNightRyder (talk) 08:40, 10 March 2008 (UTC)

Anyone got a cite for the claim "However General Custer himself fell holding a couple of Schofield revolvers (made by rival gunmaker Smith & Wesson) in his hands."? AFAIK, Custer had a pair of Webley RIC revolvers on him at Little Bighorn, not S&Ws. --Commander Zulu 03:11, 20 May 2006 (UTC)

Revolving rifles[edit]

The revolving chamber technically isn't a magazine right? AllStarZ 02:05, 18 June 2006 (UTC)

That's an excellent question... I've never heard it called one. The cylinder's always applied to sidearms, AFAIK; I'd only expect a mag to apply to rifles. Not that it's much help... Trekphiler 09:26, 13 December 2006 (UTC)

I've never heard a revolver's cylinder called a "magazine." Technically, I guess it fits the definition, but it's just not a term used. Magazines hold any ordinance, i.e., a battleship has a "magazine." In firearms, a magazine can be detachable or internal ("blind"). Semi-automatic handguns (true "pistols") certainly have magazines, usually detachable and housed in the grip. The Model 1911 referenced in the article is a good example of such. A Mauser "broomhandle" (Model of 1893?) pistol is uncommon in that it has a blind magazine located in front of the trigger. Such magazines, whether in rifles or pistols, are often loaded via a "clip" that hold cartridges together so that they can be pushed in as a stack, rather than loaded singly (and tediously). The term "clip" is often misused to describe a detachable magazine. Probably more info than you wanted, but too much is probably better than too little. Cheers. Jororo05 (talk) 22:43, 15 August 2015 (UTC)

Colt-manufactured throwing knifes[edit]

At amazon.com, write the search word "Colt Stainless Thrower" and you'll find throwing knifes made by colt.

Maybe someone could add to the article some information about colt's knife manufacturing.


No mention of Colts earlier revolvers[edit]

In the section History:1847-1911 it says: "Colt's early history largely revolved around the production of revolvers[...]The first of these is the aforementioned 1873 Single Action Army"

The first of these was the 1873 Single Action Army?? What about the earlier Paterson and Colt 1860 Army and Navy Cap & Ball revolvers? The were his first revolutionary designs. I'll try to add more on this as i find some sources to cite. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 24.205.138.69 (talk) 07:07, 24 December 2006 (UTC).

THE COMPANY

um...yeah, Colt's not a public company, it's private.


Fair use rationale for Image:Colt logo black.jpg[edit]

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Fair use rationale for Image:Colt logo.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Colt logo.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 20:51, 13 February 2008 (UTC)

Mention of United States Firearms Mfg. Co.[edit]

There's mention on this page of United States Firearms Mfg. Co. but no double brackets around the company name. Would it be alright to add them? Newportm (talk) 02:42, 27 June 2008 (UTC)


Custer[edit]

In the article, it states:

However General Custer himself fell holding a couple of English-made Webley revolvers in his hands

I don't know much about the history of revolvers, but the article on Webley revolvers says they weren't designed until 11 years after Custer's death. So either this statement or that article is wrong somewhere. 86.21.225.156 (talk) 08:01, 4 August 2009 (UTC)

In John E. Parsons (Copyright 1953) and John S. du Mont's Book "Firearms In The Custer Battle", I can read, page 17: "...Lieutenant Godfrey wrote: General Custer carried a Remington Sporting Rifle and two Bulldog, selfcocking, English, white-handled Pistols with a ring in the butt for a lanyard..." Page 20: "...Prior to 1876 there was a type of English pistol on the market known as Webley's Bulldog model...equipped with a ring in the butt.." This Webley was derived from the Webley Royal Irish Constabulary Revolver (RIC), issued 1868 in .450 calibre. Another English revolver in the Custer family was Tom Custers cased Galand & Somerville revolver, without a lanyard ring; this gun ist still existing. So I think that General Custer carried two Webley revolvers in the battle of the Little Bighorn. --hmaag (talk) 10:57, 10 September 2009 (UTC)

I went ahead and added that info to the article. AliveFreeHappy (talk) 17:54, 16 September 2010 (UTC)

Colt Founded When?[edit]

The article states that Colt founded the company during the Mexican War. The war was from 1846-48. Colt produced his first Paterson guns in 1836. The Paterson enterprise closed (not sure exactly when) but Colt was able to start anew with contracts secured to arm Texan/US troops for the Mexican War (again not sure on dates). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 204.64.50.216 (talk) 13:45, 23 May 2011 (UTC)

Some details on the founding of Colt's first company (the Patent Arms Manufacturing Company of Paterson, New Jersey, Colt's Patent, founded "soon after" the patent [which would suggest either 1835 or 1836] and ended production "by 1842") and his second (Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company, 1848 onward), as well as an interim period between '42 and '48 when he was subbing out to the Whitney armory and using its facilities (it being run by Eli Whitney Jr, son of the elder, more famous, cotton-gin Eli), are found on page 47 of Hounshell 1984. Without any extensive excerpt here, hopefully I've given you the most wanted info, and encouraged you to see that book for the rest! Cheers, — ¾-10 19:23, 23 May 2011 (UTC)
Just to complete the record on this thread, I note that I've now beefed up the 1836-1911 subsection of the history section, with Hounshell 1984 and Roe 1916 as refs. — ¾-10 05:32, 28 May 2011 (UTC)

That is much better. I'm very limited in my html & citation skills, but I know wrong info when I see it. You have improved this article greatly. Thanks! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 204.64.50.216 (talk) 20:44, 9 June 2011 (UTC)

colt Mustang[edit]

Under the list of guns there is not a colt mustang or a colt mustang article i realize this is a rather new gun that they have already stopped making but there is not a lot of pooled information for this gun any where on the internet I would like to see an article started for this topic. — Preceding unsigned comment added by V0nduck12 (talkcontribs) 16:18, 12 September 2011 (UTC)

1915 duty weapon for pittsburgh police[edit]

I am trying to discover what duty firearm the Pittsburgh Pa. Police were assigned in 1915. I've been told they used a S+W .38 model 10 and others have said they used a Colt .38, both believed to have 6" barrels. If anyone can help with suggestions/information please e-mail me at bbbuddyb@verizon.net Thank You — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.236.217.110 (talk) 22:18, 16 March 2012 (UTC)

cleaning[edit]

I have a colt 45 aut. and no manal to clean it????? Lenny — Preceding unsigned comment added by 166.249.128.119 (talk) 22:53, 9 May 2012 (UTC)


Explanation of Note 1 (Inventor of Revolver)[edit]

"Mr. (Jeptha Avery Wilkinson) seems to have been particularly unfortunate with his inventions. The following extract from a letter from his son Albert of Long Island Illustrates this point in regard to an invention that has brought untold wealth to the successful manufacturer in America. All have heard of the "REVOLVER", a species of fire-arms in general use in the army and navy, and all over the country, but very few know who originally invented it. It bears the name of "Colt's Revolver" but while in Hartford, Ct. in June, 1866. I had conversation with several gentlement in regard to Colt's fire-arm this being his place of residence, and they informed me that Colt was not the inventor, but that he got the drawings from a French officer in Paris. The following statement will explain the whole matter. (testimony from Albert Wilkinson) "My father conceived the idea of a repeating revolver, and while at Paris, France, showed his drawing to an officer of the French Government. A Mr Colt of Colt's revolver notoriety then a young man saw the drawings in question at the office, or residence of this officer, and went and secured patents on the same, ahead of my father, and thus has Colt built up a fortune and a name and robbed the original inventor of the honor to which he was so justly entitled." Jeptha Wilkinson is a very important inventor/developer of the modern Press, notwithstanding that he did not protect the original design. He should be remembered as the inventor of: 1. The Revolver, 2. The Reed Machine, 3. The First Cylindrical Printing Press


I moved the above comment down to the end of this file so that it will be in proper chronological order, as the above comment seemed to be originally randomly placed into the middle of this talk page. I also removed the note it referenced from the article since it also seemed to be a bit misplaced (it was placed in a sentence referencing the AR-15/M-16 but commented about early revolvers). I made no effort to check the validity of the information presented. If you feel this should be added back into the article somewhere, please format it correctly and add it to an appropriate section. Engineer comp geek (talk) 17:38, 16 May 2012 (UTC)

It is a copy/paste job from that person's family on Ancestry.com. It does not warrant inclusion in this article. There is nothing reliable to back up those claims.--Mike - Μολὼν λαβέ 20:29, 17 May 2012 (UTC)

Trying to find out the year it was made.[edit]

I have a colt derringer. It takes 22 shorts. The number on it is 55570D. Can anyone help me or guide me where to find out my question. Thank you. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.92.152.203 (talk) 01:50, 12 December 2013 (UTC)

4th Model Derringer made 1959 - c. 1963. Serial 1 - 89727 -- hmaag (talk) 23:46, 31 March 2014 (UTC)

Colt Shotguns[edit]

The page on Colt Manufacturing Company does a nice job describing the evolution of the company and most of its fireamrms but omits any discussion of colt shotguns. I know the that in 1878 they introduced a side by side double barrle with external hammers. This gun was discontinued in 1881 or there-aboust and was replace in 1883 with another side by side double that was hammerless (internal firing pins). Both of these old double barrel models are very collectable today. Colt also made other forays into the shotgun market in the 60's (pump and semi-auto models) and later, in the 80's tried to develop and market an 8-cylinder revolver-type action shotgun called the "Defender" which never caught on and never went into full mass production. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colt_Defender_Mark_I) Prototype and limited-run versions of this model are rare and very valuable to collectors. I am not a firearms expert and do not have references for the info posted here but thought it might trigger (pun intended) someone who knows more about it than I do to make the appropriate additions to the main page for Colt.--71.168.246.145 (talk) 15:20, 16 January 2014 (UTC)

44 cal 1861 or 1851[edit]

Was there such a .44 cal 1861 or 1851 colt navy or army model produced — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.94.124.165 (talk) 02:39, 1 December 2014 (UTC)

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Number of Employees[edit]

In the Colt's Manufacturing Company article, the number of employees is listed as five in the infobox. What is the correct number? Thanks! –Zfish118talk 04:10, 30 June 2017 (UTC)

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