Talk:Comb

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Connexion[edit]

I don't know enough about combs to make any conclusions, but I can't make the connection between a comb, a carillon, and a music box. However, I have not tried to fix this perceived oddity.--Rbeas 03:14, 29 July 2005 (UTC)

A music box has a "comb" that makes the notes. All the best: Rich Farmbrough, 21:52, 27 July 2015 (UTC).

Afro[edit]

Hey, black people have a special comb just for black people, I saw it on TV. It is made of wood and its longer.

Then add it, you idiot

Saw the same thing, and that's not a comb, you idiot. It's a stick. From the bad old days before the Civil War. (And your "its" above, for "it is", should be "it's")Myles325a (talk) 08:45, 26 July 2012 (UTC)

Come on? I think the etymology links with kometes in greek. Which means long hair. Makes sense?

"Then add it, you jerk"[edit]

Should people really be just adding things they don't know about but saw on TV?

Indeed not - in fact, nothing should be added without a reliable source, which "I saw it on TV" is not. Please remember to sign your comments with four tildes, moron. --Pyreforge 07:45, 27 September 2007 (UTC)

"combing for evidence"[edit]

Does anyone have a source for "The phrase often used by police detectives: "we are combing through the evidence" relates to the actual use of an over-sized, novelty "Acme" comb at the scene of a crime."? I've never heard this before. PirateAngel (talk) 11:59, 30 November 2008 (UTC)

It's totally true. -_- —Preceding unsigned comment added by 201.1.1.254 (talk) 22:00, 4 August 2009 (UTC)

Hair Polarizer???[edit]

I really doubt that a hair polarizer is an actual term for a comb - although it may refer to some other hair-related device. 121.79.39.223 (talk) 20:59, 21 September 2009 (UTC)

Indeed, there aren't many good Google hits for "hair polarizer" that aren't Wikipedia clones, and the best of them is [1]:

The scalp is examined with a hair polarizer which combines computer and microscopic technology to help establish the nature of the problem. The scalp is magnified 60x zoom, the hair shaft 150 x zoom, and shows the condition of the hair follicles, the scalp and the hair shaft.

"Computer and microscopic technology" doesn't quite sound like the humble comb. Zapping it. 4pq1injbok (talk) 05:59, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

hackle comb[edit]

there's no page for the rare hackle comb used to comb fleece to spin on a drop spindle or such. It's basically just a bored with nails in it but they can go for $150.00 and upwards. Here is a page selling one.. Just mentioning this to make Wikipedia the infinite resource it is; maybe a page 'types of comb tools' or such with a mention of it. :p 70.59.140.179 (talk) 06:38, 16 November 2009 (UTC)

The hair pick described at the top of the page is a common device and even comes in a folding version to fit in pockets. They have a fairly long handle that broadens into a horizontal piece that holds the times extending outward from the handle. It is used to reach deeply into kinked hair, untangle the hairs to stand outward from the head and produce a full appearance. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.144.83.33 (talk) 03:22, 20 December 2009 (UTC)

unbreakable plastic combs[edit]

Unbreakable plastic combs were introduced in the early 1960s. Unlike older plastic combs, they would not shatter if dropped on a hard surface. The advantage of those older combs over traditional metal combs was presumably the much lower price. Should that development be mentioned here? Michael Hardy (talk) 21:13, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Fine-toothed comb and fine toothcomb[edit]

Of course, we are all familiar with the "fine-toothed comb" both as an actual artifact, and in the trope "going through [something] with a fine-toothed comb". But there is, in fact, a "fine toothcomb". These can be used on your teeth in the morning after a night of very heavy drinking. I actually have one, and could send in a YouTube clip showing how to operate it, if there is any demand for such Myles325a (talk) 08:42, 26 July 2012 (UTC)

File:Plastic comb, 2015-06-07.jpg to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Plastic comb, 2015-06-07.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on December 18, 2017. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2017-12-18. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page. Thank you. — Chris Woodrich (talk) 02:04, 6 December 2017 (UTC)

Comb
A black plastic comb. Toothed devices used for styling, cleaning and managing hair and scalp, combs have been used since prehistoric times, and examples date back to 5,000 years. Combs vary in shape according to function, and can be made out of a number of materials. Most combs are plastic, metal, or wood; ivory combs were also once common.Photograph: Chris Woodrich