Talk:Jewel Plummer Cobb

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Early Life and Education

Cobb enjoyed an upper-middle-class background and had access to her father’s library, which contained scientific journals.[1]It is recorded that the concerns and accomplishments of Black Americans were often discussed in her household. [2]She initially intended to become a physical education teacher. However, during her sophomore year of high school, she became interested in biology. [3] It should be noted that both her schoolwork and interest in science were strongly supported by her parents. Her dissertation “Mechanisms of Pigment Formation” examined the way melanin pigment granules could be formed in vitro using the enzyme tyrosinase.[4]

Research

In addition, Cobb was the first to publish data on the ability of actinomycin D to cause a reduction of nucleoli in the nucleus of human normal and malignant cells.[5] Cobb has collaborated with numerous other researchers, including noted oncologist Jane C. Wright,Grace Antikajian, and Dorothy Walker Jones. Her most influential mentors were her bacteriology professor James R. Hayden and biochemistry professor M.J. Kopac.[6]

Academic Administration

Julian Foster, a campus leader and prominent political scientist, said Cobb's emphasis on research and scholarship may be her most important contribution.[7] Cobb is noted for her compassion during her time as president. Chairman of speech communications Joyce Flocken said she was touched when she read Cobb's philosophy in a newspaper article-- "Remember, everyone's trying to get through this life the best way they can".[8]

Legacy

Many of Cobb’s policies and programs during her administrative career can be traced back to her 1979 paper “Filters for Women in Science.” In her paper, Jewel Plummer Cobb expresses her thoughts about the under representation of women in science and engineering fields. She uses the analogy of a filter. She claims that the characteristics of the filtrate passing through a filter are primarily determined by the size of the pores. Then, she asserts that the pores in the filters to pass through in order to have a scientific career are smaller for women than they are for men. She highlights six filters: socialization in the preschool years, elementary school experience, junior high school experience, high school years, college and graduate school. She emphasizes the need to eliminate math anxiety from female behavior patterns.[9] At Fullerton, she set up teams of faculty members to tutor students on math skills. She also worked with six colleges to find funding for minority grants and fellowships. Similarly, during her time at Connecticut College, she set up a privately funded program for minority students in premedical and predental studies.[10] A former student Timothy Yarboro has said, “I would not have become a doctor. Because of her, I knew it was possible.”[11] In addition, she urged the women’s movement and the civil rights movement to collaborate. In terms of her political and moral beliefs, it is known that Cobb opposed the Vietnam War and spoke at anti-war demonstrations. [12]

Racism

Cobb had her first encounter with racism when she was transferred from the predominantly white Sexton Elementary School to the “overcrowded, old, and dilapidated Betsy Ross Elementary School.” [13] During her time at Englewood high school, she was subject to the gerrymandering schemes of the Chicago Board of Education. Although the University of Michigan was an excellent collegiate choice in terms of academics, it was a huge disappointment in terms of how Black students were treated. Cobb recalls her assignment to a League House, a black “official” residence. She later stated, “ the popular grills and the famous Pretzel Bell Tavern did not welcome Black students. And so I was never allowed in the mainstream of social life on campus.”[14]

Subsequent activities

In 1991, Cobb became principal investigator at Southern California Science and Engineering ACCESS Center and Network, which helps middle school and high school students from disadvantaged backgrounds enter engineering and science fields. In 2001, she was principal investigator for Science Technology Engineering Program (STEP) Up for Youth—ASCEND project at California State University, Los Angeles.[15] She is currently suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.[16]

Awards, Honors, and Memberships

Honorary doctorates:

  • Medical College of Pennsylvania
  • Northern University
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Rutgers University
  • Tuskegee University

Awards

  • Reginald Wilson Award
  • 1993 Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Academy of Sciences
  • 1999 Achievement in Excellence Award from the Center for Excellence in Education

Memberships

  • Human Resource Commission
  • Sigma Xi
  • National Academy of Sciences (Institute of Medicine)
  • National Science Foundation.
  • Allied Corporation's board of directors
  • Tissue Culture Association of the Education Committee (1972-1974)
  • Marine Biological Laboratory
  • Board of Trustees for the Institute of Education Management

Publications

  • A National Assessment of Performance and Participation of Women in Mathematics, 1979
  • A Study of the Learning Environment at Women’s Colleges, 1981
  • A Survey of Black American Doctorates, 1968
  • A Survey of the Current Status and Plans of Colleges Traditionally for Women Only, 1972
  • A Survey of Research Concerns on Women’s Issues, 1975
  • Academic Challenges, 1990
  • Access and Power for Blacks in Higher Education, 1972
  • Advancing Women’s Leadership in Science, 1995
  • An Assessment of Factors Affecting Female Participation in Advanced Placement Programs in Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physics, 1975
  • An Impact Analysis of Sponsored Projects to Increase the Participation of Women in Careers in Science and Technology, 1977
  • And Pleasantly Ignore my Sex, 1974
  • Annual Report of the National Science Foundation Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Technology, 1982
  • Black Initiative and Governmental Responsibility, 1987
  • Campus 1970, Where do Women Stand? Research Report of a Survey on Women in Academe, 1970
  • Careers in Science and Engineering for Black Americans, 1972
  • Catalyst Annual Report, 1978-1979
  • Changing America: The New Face of Science and Engineering, 1989
  • College Resource Council—Study on Seniors and Freshman of a Number of Colleges Within the Member Group, u.d.
  • Committee on the Education and Employment of Women in Science and Engineering (CEEWISE), 1977-1979
  • Data on Women in Scientific Research, 1977
  • Degree Awards to Women: An Update, 1979
  • Degrees Granted and Enrollment Trends in Historically Black Colleges: An Eight-Year Study, 1965
  • Department of Health, Education and Welfare- Statement by the Director, National Cancer Program, National Cancer Institute, 1975

References

  1. ^ Jewel Plummer Cobb. (2004). In Encyclopedia of World Biography (2nd ed., Vol. 22, pp. 112-114). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved March 14, 2016, from http://ezproxy.msu.edu.proxy1.cl.msu.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com.proxy1.cl.msu.edu/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3404707987&v=2.1&u=msu_main&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=32d8a550785208d049340eaea97b7f55.
  2. ^ Warren, W. (1999). Black women scientists in the United States. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  3. ^ Jewel Plummer Cobb. (2004). In Encyclopedia of World Biography (2nd ed., Vol. 22, pp. 112-114). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved March 14, 2016, from http://ezproxy.msu.edu.proxy1.cl.msu.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com.proxy1.cl.msu.edu/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3404707987&v=2.1&u=msu_main&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=32d8a550785208d049340eaea97b7f55
  4. ^ Warren, W. (1999). Black women scientists in the United States. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  5. ^ Warren, W. (1999). Black women scientists in the United States. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  6. ^ Warren, W. (1999). Black women scientists in the United States. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  7. ^ Davidson, J. (1989, October 27). Cal State Fullerton's Cobb to Step Down After 8 Years. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 15, 2016, from http://articles.latimes.com/1989-10-27/news/mn-787_1_cal-state-fullerton"
  8. ^ Davidson, J. (1989, October 27). Cal State Fullerton's Cobb to Step Down After 8 Years. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 15, 2016, from http://articles.latimes.com/1989-10-27/news/mn-787_1_cal-state-fullerton"
  9. ^ Cobb, J. P. (1979). Filters for Women in Science. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 323, 236-248. Retrieved March 16, 2016, from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1979.tb16857.x/epdf"
  10. ^ Carey, P. M. (2012). The power of a role model Biologist Jewel Plummer Cobb inspired a generation of Connecticut College students. Connecticut College Magazine.
  11. ^ Carey, P. M. (2012). The power of a role model Biologist Jewel Plummer Cobb inspired a generation of Connecticut College students. Connecticut College Magazine.
  12. ^ Carey, P. M. (2012). The power of a role model Biologist Jewel Plummer Cobb inspired a generation of Connecticut College students. Connecticut College Magazine.
  13. ^ Warren, W. (1999). Black women scientists in the United States. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  14. ^ Warren, W. (1999). Black women scientists in the United States. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  15. ^ Yu, M. (2001, November 19). Wilson award 2001. Retrieved March 15, 2016, from http://www.calstatela.edu/univ/ppa/newsrel/jpcobb2.htm
  16. ^ Carey, P. M. (2012). The power of a role model Biologist Jewel Plummer Cobb inspired a generation of Connecticut College students. Connecticut College Magazine.

Semi-protected edit request on 5 January 2017[edit]

Jewel Plummer Cobb passed away on January 1, 2017. The page needs to be updated to reflect that. 2605:E000:3647:EF00:357E:8D10:3E52:6AB1 (talk) 00:29, 5 January 2017 (UTC)

Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. —MRD2014 (talkcontribs) 00:56, 5 January 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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