Tan Parker

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Tan Parker
Majority Leader of the Texas House of Representatives
In office
January 14, 2015 – March 8, 2018
Preceded byCindy Burkett (Acting)
Succeeded byCindy Burkett
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from the 63rd district
Assumed office
January 9, 2007
Preceded byMary Denny
Personal details
Born (1971-05-22) May 22, 1971 (age 48)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Beth Parker
Children2
EducationUniversity of Dallas (BA)
London School of Economics (MA)

Tan Parker (born May 22, 1971) is a businessman and Republican politician who has served since 2007 in the Texas House of Representatives. He was elected in 2006 to represent District 63 in southwestern Denton County.[1] Parker sought the position of Texas House Speaker with the retirement of Joe Straus but then withdrew his candidacy in 2018 to support the consensus choice, Representative Dennis Bonnen of Angleton in Brazoria County.

Background[edit]

Parker was educated at the University of Dallas, at which he served in the College Republicans Club. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in political philosophy and Economics in 1993. In 1992 he worked briefly in the White House of George H. W. Bush. He later earned a Master's Degree from the London School of Economics.[2]

Parker serves on several board of directors and advisory councils, including the University of Dallas,[3] Communities in Schools North Texas, the Children’s Advocacy Center for Denton County, and Kyle’s Place, an emerging shelter project for homeless teens.[4]

Parker resides in Flower Mound with his wife of over 20 years, Beth Haugan Parker, who he met while a student at the University of Dallas. The Parkers have two daughters, Lauren and Ashley.[5]

Political career[edit]

In 2006, Parker first ran for state office when his predecessor, Mary C. Denny, vacated the seat for House District 63. He faced four opponents in the Republican primary election, including Lewisville ISD board president Anne Lakusta, who received the endorsement of the Dallas Morning News.[6] Parker garnered the most votes in the primary but needed a runoff to defeat Lakusta. No other party fielded a candidate in the general election, so Parker's runoff election win earned him the seat.[7]

In 2008, Parker faced two candidates, Democrat Jesus Carrillo and Libertarian candidate John Turner. He defeated both with 64,048 votes (72.97 percent) to Carrillo's 19,883 (22.65 percent) and Turner's 3,831 (4.36 percent).[8]

In 2010, he was unopposed in both the Republican primary and the general election.

In 2012, Parker ran unopposed in the Republican primary election and defeated Bruce Hermann Libertarian in the general election, which took place on November 6, 2012.[9]

In 2014, he ran unopposed in the Republican primary election. He faced Democrat David Moran in the general election and defeated Moran with 30,809 votes (77.3%) to Moran's 9,026 (22.7%).[10]

In 2015, Parker's colleagues elected him the Chairman of the House Republican Caucus and he was chosen later that year as the best legislator by Texas Monthly magazine.[11]

On March 1, 2016, he once again won the Republican primary election for House District 63. Parker is currently serving his sixth term in the Texas House of Representatives.[12]

Upon entering the 85th Legislative Session, Parker was unanimously re-elected as the chairman of the House Republican Caucus,[13] which represents the Republican members of the Texas House by supplying its members with policy development and other crucial support services.[14]

On March 8, 2018, Parker became the third member of the House of Representatives to file for Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives to replace Joe Straus, a moderate Republican, who steps down with the regular legislative session in January 2019.[15] He subsequently won reelection on November 6, 52,893 votes (67.2 percent) to 25,852 (32.8 percent) for his Democratic opponent, Laura Maines.[16] Thereafter, he left the speaker's race.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tan Parker's Biography". Vote Smart. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  2. ^ "Tan Parker's Biography". Vote Smart. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  3. ^ http://www.udallas.edu/about/administration/
  4. ^ "Tan Parker's Biography". Vote Smart. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  5. ^ http://www.tanparker.com/meet-tan/
  6. ^ "2006 Republican Primary Election Race Summary". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  7. ^ "2006 Republican Primary Runoff Election Race Summary". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  8. ^ "2008 General Election Race Summary". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  9. ^ "2012 General Election Race Summary". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  10. ^ "2014 General Election Race Summary". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  11. ^ https://www.texasmonthly.com/list/the-best-and-worst-legislators-2015/the-best-representative-tan-parker/
  12. ^ "Tan Parker". Texas Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  13. ^ http://starlocalmedia.com/theleader/news/parker-re-elected-as-chairman-of-house-republican-caucus/article_cf7589d0-de8a-11e6-82b6-a30461a34085.html
  14. ^ http://www.texashousecaucus.com/tan_parker
  15. ^ Tribune, The Texas (2018-03-08). "Tan Parker is third Republican to file for Texas House Speaker". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved 2018-05-13.
  16. ^ "Election Returns". Texas Secretary of State. November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 11, 2018.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Mary C. Denny
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from District 63 (Flower Mound)

2007 – present
Incumbent