Te Atatū (New Zealand electorate)

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Te Atatū electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Te Atatū (before 2008 spelled Te Atatu, without a macron) is a parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Te Atatū is Phil Twyford of the Labour Party.[1]

Population centres[edit]

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government.[2] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill in an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island.[3] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Te Atatu) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election.[4]

Te Atatū comprises the suburbs of Waitakere City on the western side of the Whau River in Auckland. The main parts of the seat are the suburbs of Glendene, Te Atatu, Lincoln and Massey. Boundary changes in the leadup to the 2008 election have seen the northern boundary edge northwards to include Massey East, with a small southern block transferred to the neighbouring Waitakere seat.

The makeup of Te Atatū shows that while its population is composed roughly inline with the national average: It is roughly the same ages as the nation (with slightly more residents over fifty), and its average income ($22627) is only slightly lower than the rest of New Zealand. Its main point of demographic difference with its country is ethnic – it has more Asian New Zealanders and more Pacific Islanders than the rest of the country.

History[edit]

The Te Atatu electorate was created ahead of the 1978 election by pulling apart the seat of Waitemata; its first MP was future cabinet minister Dr Michael Bassett, who had been the MP for Waitemata from 1972 until 1975 before an anti-labour landslide cost him his job. Bassett held the seat until his retirement in 1990, when a toxic battle to succeed Bassett in an already lean year for Labour passed one of their safe seats into the hands of Brian Neeson. Neeson himself never represented the same seat twice in succession, (having jumped ship to Waitakere in 1993, Waipareia in 1996, to a new, larger Waitakere seat in 1999 before being denied the chance to contest Helensville in 2002), and his departure in 1993, coupled with a reversal of electoral fortune for the National Party (down from 47.8 to 35.1 percent) lead to a victory for incoming Labour MP Chris Carter. In his first three years in Parliament, Carter made news for being the first openly gay member of Parliament.

With the introduction of MMP voting in 1996, Te Atatū was scrapped in favour of a new seat called Waipareira, which covered the same area as Te Atatū, but also included the wealthy harbourside suburbs to the north of the seat. Neeson and Carter were rematched, when the presence of former Labour MP for West Auckland turned New Zealand First candidate Jack Elder, undermined Carter's chances and handed the seat to Neeson by fewer than a thousand votes.

Three years later, Te Atatu was re-established, with the new seat focused more on the working class suburbs at the southern end of Waitakere City and Carter had no such trouble using the seat to springboard back into Parliament. In 2002 and 2005, because the electoral climate favoured Labour, Carter and his party dominated the seat, winning at least 49 percent of the candidate and list vote, but the Labour vote was reduced in the 2008 election.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Key

 Labour    National    Independent    Alliance  

Election Winner
1978 election Michael Bassett
1981 election
1984 election
1987 election
1990 election Brian Neeson
1993 election Chris Carter
(Electorate abolished 1996–1999, see Waipareira)
1999 election Chris Carter
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election
2011 election Phil Twyford
2014 election
2017 election

List MPs[edit]

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections since 1999 where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Te Atatū electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs' terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
1999 election Laila Harré
2005 election Tau Henare1
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election Alfred Ngaro
2017 election
Golriz Ghahraman

Election results[edit]

2017 election[edit]

2017 general election: Te Atatu[5]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Phil Twyford 16,774 15,406 43.8
National Alfred Ngaro 13,590 14,514 41.2
NZ First David Wilson 1,609 2,256
Green Golriz Ghahraman 1,413 1,715
ACT Stephen Fletcher 240 170
Conservative Marilyn Johnson 164 120
Independent Tua Schuster 133
Opportunities   451
Māori   161
Legalise Cannabis   104
People's Party   42
United Future   25
Mana   15
Outdoors   15
Internet   14
Ban 1080   13
Democrats   8
Informal votes 381 170
Total Valid votes 34,304 35,199
Labour hold Majority 3,184

2014 election[edit]

2014 general election: Te Atatū[6]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Phil Twyford 15,676 48.11 −5.72 11,603 34.81 −4.10
National Alfred Ngaro 12,863 39.48 +4.03 13,614 40.84 −0.35
Green Gary Stewart 1,618 4.97 −0.95 2,684 8.05 +0.81
Conservative Paddy O'Rourke 965 2.96 −0.79 1,243 3.73 +0.97
ACT Stephen Fletcher 416 1.28 +0.23 450 1.35 +0.47
Legalise Cannabis Adrian McDermott 328 1.01 +1.01 122 0.37 −0.18
Internet Chris Yong 300 0.92 +0.92
NZ First   2,784 8.35 +1.60
Internet Mana   380 1.14 +1.14
Māori   142 0.43 −0.20
United Future   52 0.16 −0.23
Ban 1080   12 0.04 +0.04
Independent Coalition   12 0.04 +0.04
Democrats   9 0.03 −0.04
Civilian   5 0.01 +0.01
Focus   0 0.00 0.00
Informal votes 416 223
Total Valid votes 32,582 33,335
Labour hold Majority 2,813 8.63 −9.75

2011 election[edit]

2011 general election: Te Atatū[7]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Phil Twyford 15,860 53.83 +0.39 11,999 38.91 -2.59
National Tau Henare 10,444 35.45 -0.79 12,701 41.19 -0.35
Green Gary Stewart 1,744 5.92 +2.66 2,231 7.24 +3.23
Conservative Cynthia Liu 1,106 3.75 +3.75 851 2.76 +2.76
ACT Dominic Costello 308 1.05 -1.85 271 0.88 -2.28
NZ First   2,081 6.75 +2.56
Māori   193 0.63 -0.21
Legalise Cannabis   169 0.55 +0.20
Mana   159 0.52 +0.52
United Future   121 0.39 -0.48
Alliance   24 0.08 -0.01
Democrats   21 0.07 +0.04
Libertarianz   14 0.05 +0.02
Informal votes 1,067 356
Total Valid votes 29,462 30,835
Labour hold Majority 5,416 18.38 +1.18

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 43,746[8]

2008 election[edit]

2008 general election: Te Atatu[9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Chris Carter 16,459 53.44 13,171 41.50
National Tau Henare 11,161 36.24 13,183 41.54
Green Xavier Goldie 1,003 3.26 1,270 4.00
ACT Lech Beltowski 891 2.89 1,002 3.16
Pacific Fiasili Jackueline Ah Tong 435 1.41 362 1.14
Kiwi Jo van Kempen 260 0.84 123 0.39
United Future Talei Solomon-Mua 250 0.81 278 0.88
Progressive Pavitra Roy 244 0.79 267 0.84
Alliance Bob van Ruyssevelt 94 0.31 27 0.09
NZ First   1,328 4.18
Māori   264 0.83
Bill and Ben   180 0.57
Family Party   134 0.42
Legalise Cannabis   111 0.35
Workers Party   12 0.04
Democrats   8 0.03
Libertarianz   8 0.03
RAM   6 0.02
RONZ   4 0.01
Informal votes 480 174
Total Valid votes 30,797 31,738
Labour hold Majority 5,298 17.20

2005 election[edit]

2005 general election: Te Atatu[10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Chris Carter 18,087 59.37 -3.12 16,209 52.03
National Tau Henare 7,640 25.08 +10.63 9,466 30.38
NZ First Moetu Davis 1,016 11.14 1,830 5.87
United Future Jo van Kemp 897 2.94 956 3.07
Green Kath Dewar 849 2.79 1,064 3.42
Māori Kelvin Martin 250 0.82 219 0.70
Progressive Patriva Roy 226 0.74 347 1.11
Christian Heritage Betty Jenkins 205 0.67 97 0.31
Alliance Bob van Ruyssevelt 104 0.34 24 0.08
Independent Adele Hughes 86 0.28
Family Rights Stella Te Paeru Brown-Knowles 77 0.25 101 0.32
Direct Democracy Gregory Trichon 56 0.18 23 0.07
ACT   379 1.03
Destiny   107 0.29
Legalise Cannabis   52 0.17
One NZ   6 0.02
RONZ   6 0.02
Libertarianz   5 0.02
99 MP   4 0.01
Democrats   4 0.01
Informal votes 370 176
Total Valid votes 30,463 31,154
Labour hold Majority 10,447 34.29 -13.75

2002 election[edit]

2002 general election: Te Atatu[11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Chris Carter 16,821 62.03 14,128 51.39
National Tau Henare 3,889 14.34 3,595 13.07
NZ First Christine Ritchie 1,811 6.67 2,953 10.74
United Future Anne Drake 1,540 5.67 2,100 7.63
ACT Ted Erskine-Legget 875 3.22 1,381 5.02
Alliance Bob van Ruyssevelt 654 2.41 618 2.24
Christian Heritage Matthew Flannagan 584 2.15 473 1.72
Progressive Pasene Taulialo-O-Lilomaiava 365 1.34 490 1.78
Independent Helen Wiseman-Dare 197 0.72
Green   1,248 4.54
ORNZ   174 0.63
Legalise Cannabis   132 0.48
One NZ   16 0.05
Mana Māori   8 0.02
NMP   3 0.01
Informal votes 378 169
Total Valid votes 27,114 27,488
Labour hold Majority 12,932 47.69

1999 election[edit]

Refer to Candidates in the New Zealand general election 1999 by electorate#Te Atatu for a list of candidates.

1993 election[edit]

1993 general election: Te Atatu[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Chris Carter 6,889 36.78
Alliance Laila Harré 5,501 29.37
National Tracey Adams 4,724 25.22
NZ First Peter Brown 1,121 5.98
Christian Heritage Alan Broadbent 342 1.82
McGillicuddy Serious Aaron Lloyd Franklin 89 0.47
Workers Rights Bill Bradford 36 0.19
Natural Law Judith Ann Boock 27 0.14
Majority 1,388 7.41
Turnout 18,729 96.90 +20.33
Registered electors 22,588

1990 election[edit]

1990 general election: Te Atatu[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
National Brian Neeson 8,662 44.75 +3.48
Labour Dan McCaffrey 7,292 37.67
Green Warwick Pudney 1,627 8.40
NewLabour Sue Pockett 1,277 6.59
Democrats Marilyn Jackson 323 1.66 -3.13
McGillicuddy Serious Kit Boyes 129 0.66
Majority 1,370 7.07
Turnout 19,355 76.57 -7.30
Registered electors 25,277

1987 election[edit]

1987 general election: Te Atatu[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Bassett 10,044 53.18 -1.38
National Brian Neeson 7,795 41.27
Democrats Marilyn Jackson 906 4.79 -0.72
NZ Party G M Oxton 140 0.74
Majority 2,249 11.90 -13.34
Turnout 18,885 83.87 -6.17
Registered electors 22,516

1984 election[edit]

1984 general election: Te Atatu[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Bassett 10,786 54.56 +6.17
National Francis William Gaucheron Diment 5,795 29.31
NZ Party Gray Phillips 1,972 9.97
Social Credit Marilyn Jackson 1,090 5.51
Independent G R Prout 126 0.63
Majority 4,991 25.24 +6.57
Turnout 19,769 90.04 +3.85
Registered electors 21,954

1981 election[edit]

1981 general election: Te Atatu[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Bassett 8,577 48.09 -0.90
National Stella Noble 5,247 29.42
Social Credit Rodney Wilson 4,009 22.48
Majority 3,330 18.67 +2.69
Turnout 17,833 86.19 +16.18
Registered electors 20,688

1978 election[edit]

1978 general election: Te Atatu[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Bassett 8,640 48.99
National W R Cross 5,821 33.01
Social Credit John Geoffrey Rawson 2,923 16.57
Values D C Bartle 250 1.41
Majority 2,819 15.98
Turnout 17,634 70.01
Registered electors 25,186

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "New Zealand Parliament – Twyford, Phil". Parliament.nz. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  2. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  3. ^ McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  4. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  5. ^ "Official Count Results – Te Atatu". Wellington: New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  6. ^ "Official Count Results – Te Atatū". Electionresults.govt.nz. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 18 December 2016.
  7. ^ "Official Count Results – Te Atatū". Electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  8. ^ "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  9. ^ "Official Count Results – Te Atatū". Electionresults.govt.nz. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  10. ^ "Official Count Results – Te Atatu". Electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1993. p. 114.
  13. ^ Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990. p. 118.
  14. ^ a b c d Norton 1988, p. 361.

References[edit]

  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8.
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103.

External links[edit]