Texas State Highway 1

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State Highway 1 marker

State Highway 1
Texarkana, Dallas, Fort Worth, and El Paso Highway
Route information
Maintained by TxDOT
Length837.421 mi[2] (1,347.698 km)
ExistedJune 21, 1917[1]–August 20, 1952[3]
HistoryReplaced by US 80 and several other highways on September 26, 1939
Designated to short spur route located in Dallas on September 26, 1939
Cancelled and redesignated to State Loop 260 on August 20, 1952
Major junctions
West endNew Mexico state line, near El Paso
  US 70 in El Paso
US 62 in El Paso
US 90 in Van Horn
US 290
US 385 in Big Spring
US 83 / US 277 in Abilene
US 283 in Cisco
US 377 in Fort Worth
US 81 in Fort Worth
US 67 in Dallas
US 77 in Dallas
US 80 in Dallas
US 271 in Mount Pleasant
US 77
East endArkansas state line, in Texarkana
Highway system
SH OSRLoop 1

State Highway 1 (SH 1) was a Texas state highway that traveled across the U.S. state of Texas. The highway traveled from Texarkana on the eastern border to El Paso on the western border, via Dallas and Fort Worth, Abilene, and MidlandOdessa. SH 1 was approximately 842 miles (1,355 km) long, and was one of the original 25 Texas state highways, which were designated on June 21, 1917.[4] In 1920, the entire length of the highway was designated as part of the Bankhead Highway, a transcontinental Auto trail. In the Texas Department of Transportation's 1939 state highway renumbering, most of SH 1 was redesignated as U.S. Route 80, as well as U.S. Route 67, and others. Most of these highways were replaced by Interstate 10, Interstate 20, and Interstate 30. The only portion of SH 1 that existed after September 26, 1939 was a short spur located in Dallas. Texas State Highway 1 was officially cancelled on August 20, 1952. Due to the highway's historic value, a highway can not be designated as Texas State Highway 1 unless by the order of TxDOT Executive Director or by the Transportation Commission.[3]

Texas State Highway 1 had several long spur routes. Most of these were simply numbered as State Highway 1, and were renumbered within a few years. Three of these spurs were separately numbered. They were Texas State Highway 1A, which was a long alternate route of SH 1 that traveled from Abilene to just west of Palo Pinto, Texas State Highway 1B, which was a short spur located in Dallas that was redesignated as SH 1 in 1939, and Texas State Highway 1C, which was a short spur located in Fort Worth that was redesignated at US 80 in 1939.

Route description[edit]

In terms of today's Interstate Highways, the routing of SH 1 is followed by Interstate 10 (I-10) from New Mexico to east of Van Horn, I-20 to west of Fort Worth, and I-30 to Texarkana.

U.S. Route 80 in Dallas in 1965. This was formerly SH 1
Old Texas 1.svg

History[edit]

SH 1 was assigned on June 21, 1917 as one of the original 25 state highways.[5] Known as the Texarkana, Dallas, Fort Worth and El Paso Highway, it crossed from Arkansas at Texarkana and ran west through Dallas, Fort Worth, Albany, Abilene, Big Spring and Van Horn to end in El Paso.[6] On September 5, 1918, it had been extended northwest from El Paso to the New Mexico border.[7][8] In February 1920,[9] the whole of SH 1 was included in the transcontinental Bankhead Highway, a marked auto trail.[10][11]

In late 1926, the United States Numbered Highways were assigned. State Highway 1 kept its number, but was also assigned U.S. Highway 80 from New Mexico to Dallas and U.S. Highway 67 from Dallas to Texarkana.[12]

By 1936, US 80 had been moved off SH 1 west of downtown Dallas.[13] While SH 1 angled northeast on Fort Worth Avenue from Cockrell Hill, crossing the Trinity River on the Commerce Street Bridge, US 80 continued east on Davis Street, turning north on Zang Boulevard and over the Houston Street Viaduct. In downtown, US 80 turned east on Commerce Street (State Highway 15), and US 67, which had joined US 80 along Davis Street, turned east on Elm Street (SH 1).[14] (Commerce Street and Elm Street later became a one-way pair.)[15] On June 21, 1938, SH 1 Spur was designated to Santo.[16] On December 1, 1938, SH 1 Loop was designated in El Paso.[17]

On September 26, 1939, SH 1 was truncated to only this short piece west from downtown Dallas. The loop became Loop 16 (El Paso). The spur became Spur 40 (Santo). It split from US 80 (Davis Street) and ran northeast on Fort Worth Avenue and Commerce Street. Upon entering downtown Dallas, it split into the one-way pair of Commerce and Elm Streets, ending at US 80 (Houston Street).[3][18] In August 20, 1952, the route was renumbered to Loop 260 and signed as U.S. Route 80 Business. Loop 260 was removed from the State Highway System and turned over to the City of Dallas on June 25, 1991, along with most of Loop 354.[19]

Branches[edit]

Old Texas 1A.svg

In the original 1917 definition, SH 1 had a split between Abilene and Palo Pinto (west of Mineral Wells). Another split was present between Sulphur Springs and Texarkana, and a branch ran from the northern route at Naples east to State Highway 8 at Douglassville.[6] SH 1 followed State Highway 39 from Greenville to Commerce and went southeast to Sulphur Springs when the route was decided. On February 19, 1918, the southern route between Sulphur Springs and Texarkana had become State Highway 1A, and a new State Highway 1B ran from SH 1 in Naples to Douglasville, and a new State Highway 1C ran southeast from SH 1A at Atlanta to the Louisiana state line.[20] On March 20, 1918, SH 1A extended north from Texarkana north to the Red River (the Arkansas border).[21]

The southern route between Abilene and Palo Pinto was improved first.[22] Thus it was designated as part of US 80 in 1926. The north route was redesignated on August 21, 1923 as State Highway 1A, and in 1932 was designated US 80N (later U.S. Highway 80 Alternate),[23][24] [25] On March 16, 1927, SH 1 was rerouted on the direct route between Sulphur Springs and Greenville, and the old route became part of SH 39 and SH 11.[26] On August 8, 1935, all of SH 1A west of Albany was transferred to SH 15, but that was not effective until September 1 of that year.[27] On October 23, 1935, US 80 and SH 1 were rerouted onto the direct route between Ranger and Weatherford, replacing part of State Highway 89,[28][29] and US 80 Alternate was extended east to Weatherford; this did not become effective until paving on SH 89 from Strawn to Weatherford was completed. It was unknown what the old route would become, but on November 19, 1935, the section from Weatherford to Palo Pinto was already part of SH 15, and the section from Palo Pinto to Strawn would become part of an extended SH 120. The SH 1A designation was removed in the 1939 general redescription, and US 80A was replaced on September 6, 1943 by State Highway 351 and U.S. Highway 180.[30][31]

The other branches, located east of Dallas, were all renumbered on August 21, 1923:[25][32]

  • The section of SH 1A from Commerce east to Daingerfield became part of State Highway 11. This road still carries SH 11. The section of SH 1A from Daingerfield to Hughes Springs became part of State Highway 49 and the section of SH 1A from Hughes Springs east to Atlanta became State Highway 48.
  • SH 1B was renumbered to State Highway 77.
  • SH 1C and the section of SH 1A from Atlanta north through Texarkana to the Red River became State Highway 47. On June 24, 1931, the section of SH 47 that replaced SH 1C became an extension of SH 77, and SH 47 was rerouted to Daingerfield, eliminating SH 48. On the September 26, 1939 redescription, SH 11 (which had gone north from Daingerfield) was extended east from Daingerfield along former SH 1A to the Red River, eliminating SH 47. (The short piece of SH 49 became a concurrency.) SH 11 was truncated to Linden on October 13, 1947, when the rest became part of U.S. Highway 59.[33]

A branch was designated on Commerce Street in Dallas on March 13, 1931. On November 11, 1933, it was known as SH 1B.[34] This was eliminated on September 26, 1939. Another SH 1C was designated on Lancaster Street on March 17, 1936.[35] This was eliminated on September 26, 1939 (became US 80).

Major junctions[edit]

CountyLocationmi[2][36]kmDestinationsNotes
El PasoVinton0.0000.000New Mexico state line / US 80Western terminus. Western end of US 80 concurrency
El Paso21.76335.024 US 70 / SH 33Southern terminus of TX 33
23.69538.133 US 62 / SH 130Western terminus of US 62 and TX 130
CulbersonVan Horn141.593227.872 US 90 / SH 3 / SH 54Southern terminus of TX 54, northern terminus of both US 90 and TX 3
Reeves189.241304.554 US 290 / SH 27Western terminus of TX 27 and US 290
Pecos229.576369.467 SH 17
WardPyote254.372409.372 SH 115Southern terminus of TX 115
Monahans263.922424.741 SH 82
EctorOdessa299.548482.076 SH 137
HowardBig Spring359.041577.820 US 385 / SH 9
MitchellColorado390.185627.942 SH 101Southern terminus of TX 101
NolanRoscoe417.966672.651 SH 7Southern terminus of TX 7
Sweetwater189.241304.554 SH 70
TaylorAbilene466.898751.399 US 83 / US 277 / SH 1A / SH 4 / SH 30Southern terminus of TX 1A
EastlandCisco511.937823.883 US 283 / SH 23
Eastland521.188838.771 SH 67
Palo Pinto555.454893.917 SH 1AEastern terminus of TX 1A
Mineral Wells576.022927.018 SH 66Southern terminus of TX 66
TarrantFort Worth611.074983.428 US 377 / SH 10Western end of TX 10/US 377 concurrency
623.0461,002.695 US 81 / US 377 / SH 2 / SH 10Eastern end of TX 10/US 377 concurrency
624.6971,005.352 SH 34Northern terminus of TX 34
DallasDallas652.6801,050.387 US 67 / SH 68Northern terminus of TX 68. West end of US 67 concurrency
653.8241,052.228 SH 6
654.4311,053.205 US 75 / US 77 / SH 40Western end of TX 40 concurrency
656.6201,056.727 US 175 / SH 40Eastern end of TX 40 concurrency
659.3721,061.156 US 80 / SH 15Eastern end of US 80 concurrency
Garland668.4401,075.750 SH 114 / SH 78
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Texas State Highway Commission, Office of State Highway Engineer (July 1917). Map Showing Proposed System of State Highways (Map) (June 1917 ed.). 1:2,112,200. Austin: Texas State Highway Commission. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Statewide Planning Map (Map). Cartography by Transportation Planning and Programming Division. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 8, 2012.
  3. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 1". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  4. ^ Staff (July 6, 1917). "'Highway Commission Adopts 25 Highways". Commerce Journal.
  5. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676699.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ a b Texas State Highway Commission, Office of State Highway Engineer (July 1917). Map Showing Proposed System of State Highways (Map) (June 1917 ed.). 1:2,112,200. Austin: Texas State Highway Commission. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  7. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676774.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ Texas State Highway Commission (October 1, 1919). Highway Map, State of Texas (Map) (1919 ed.). 1:1,584,00. Austin: Texas State Highway Commission. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  9. ^ Weingroff, Richard F. (May 31, 2012). "Zero Milestone – Washington, D.C." Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved May 31, 2012.
  10. ^ Midget Map of the Transcontinental Trails of the United States (Map). Midget. 1923. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  11. ^ Staff. Bankhead Highway in Garland (Texas Historical Marker). Garland, TX: Texas Historical Commission. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  12. ^ Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via University of North Texas Libraries.
  13. ^ Google (April 20, 2012). "Overview map of Former Texas State Highway 1" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 20, 2012.
  14. ^ General Highway Map: Dallas County, Rockwall County, Texas (Map). Texas State Highway Department. 1936. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  15. ^ General Highway Map: Dallas County, Rockwall County, Texas (Map). Texas State Highway Department. January 1, 1961. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  16. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676245.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  17. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676253.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  18. ^ TXDOT Map (Map). Texas Department of Transportation. 1954. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007.
  19. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway Loop No. 260". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  20. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676753.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  21. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676757.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  22. ^ Texas State Highway Commission (December 1, 1922). Highway Map of the State of Texas (Map) (1922 ed.). 1:1,267,200. Austin: Texas State Highway Commission. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  23. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "U.S. Highway No. 80". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  24. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "U.S. Highway No. 80-br Alternate". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  25. ^ a b Official Highway Map of Texas (Map). State Highway Commission. 1926. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  26. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676970.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  27. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003673871.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  28. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003673876.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  29. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003673877.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  30. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 351". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  31. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "U.S. Highway No. 180". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  32. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003676878.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  33. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 11". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  34. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003673801.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  35. ^ (PDF) https://publicdocs.txdot.gov/minord/MinuteOrderDocLib/003673880.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  36. ^ Map of Texas (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha. Conoco. 1938. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007.

External links[edit]

Media related to Texas State Highway 1 at Wikimedia Commons