Thomas Kincaid-Smith

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Thomas Kincaid-Smith
Thomas Malcolm Harvey Kincaid-Smith, Vanity Fair, 1909-08-18.jpg
Member of Parliament
for Stratford-on-Avon
In office
12 January 1906 – 8 April 1909
Preceded byPhilip Foster
Succeeded byPhilip Foster
Personal details
Born6 July 1874
Died31 December 1938 (aged 64)
CitizenshipBritish
Political partyLiberal (1906–1909)
Independent (1909)
National Party (1918)

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Malcolm Harvey Kincaid-Smith (6 July 1874 – 31 December 1938), known as Malcolm Kincaid-Smith was a British Liberal politician and soldier.

Commissioned a second lieutenant into the 9th Lancers on 10 October 1894, he was promoted to lieutenant on 25 September 1895.[1] Kincaid-Smith was seconded for Colonial Office service in October 1898.[2] When he returned from secondment he was back as a regular lieutenant in his regiment in January 1900,[3] and served with the provisional Regiment of Lancers in South Africa during the Second Boer War. Following the end of the war in June 1902, he left Cape Town on the SS Canada and returned to Southampton in late July.[4] He was promoted captain in 1903,[5] but went on half-pay in 1904 due to ill health,[6] and resigned his commission in 1908.[7]

Kincaid-Smith was elected as Member of Parliament for Stratford-on-Avon in 1906. In 1909, he resigned his seat and left the Liberal Party to advocate compulsory military training. He stood as an independent, supported by the National Service League, at the ensuing by-election, but was badly defeated.

Upon the outbreak of World War I, he was recalled from the reserve and appointed a staff officer.[8] He was made an assistant provost-marshal in 1915,[9] holding the post for a year.[10] He was made a temporary major in the Wiltshire Regiment,[11] and then a temporary lieutenant-colonel while commanding a school of instruction[12] and a musketry camp in 1917.[13] In 1918, Kincaid-Smith was transferred to command of a reception camp as a temporary major.[14]

He stood for the National Party in 1918, but was defeated.

He left the reserves due to age in 1929.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No. 26665". The London Gazette. 24 September 1895. p. 5300.
  2. ^ "No. 27019". The London Gazette. 1 November 1898. p. 6375.
  3. ^ "No. 27152". The London Gazette. 9 January 1900. p. 146.
  4. ^ "The Army in South Africa - Troops returning home". The Times (36821). London. 16 July 1902. p. 11.
  5. ^ "No. 27549". The London Gazette. 5 May 1903. p. 2841.
  6. ^ "No. 27743". The London Gazette. 13 December 1904. p. 8558.
  7. ^ "No. 28134". The London Gazette. 5 May 1908. p. 3314.
  8. ^ "No. 28912". The London Gazette. 22 September 1914. p. 7571.
  9. ^ "No. 29156". The London Gazette. 7 May 1915. p. 4410.
  10. ^ "No. 29580". The London Gazette. 12 May 1916. p. 4822.
  11. ^ "No. 29553". The London Gazette. 18 April 1916. p. 4108.
  12. ^ "No. 29958". The London Gazette. 23 February 1917. p. 1881.
  13. ^ "No. 30359". The London Gazette. 30 October 1917. p. 11257.
  14. ^ "No. 30943". The London Gazette. 8 October 1918. p. 11924.
  15. ^ "No. 33519". The London Gazette. 23 July 1929. p. 4852.

Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs

Further reading[edit]

  • Johnson, Matthew (2013). Militarism and the British Left, 1902-1914. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-1-137-27412-0.

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Philip Foster
Member of Parliament for Stratford-on-Avon
1906–1909
Succeeded by
Philip Foster