Timeline of Kenya

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This is a timeline of the History of Kenya comprising important legal and territorial changes as well as political, social, and economic events in Kenya, read more at History of Kenya.

Kenyan Timeline[edit]

Year Date Event
3rd Millennium BC First Kenyans settle the land[1]
500 BC-1000 AD Bantu Groups settle in Southern Kenya[2]

Cushites (including Arabians and Indians) settle into Kenyan coast[3]

Southern Nilotic speaking communities move south

8th Century AD Swahili develops as an East African lingua franca
1498 April Vasco da Gama reaches coastal Kenya[4]
1505 Portugal begin rule presence in Mombasa
1593 Fort Jesus is built in Mombasa to solidify Portuguese hegemony[5]
1698 Omani Arabs capture Fort Jesus
1830 Slave trade flourishes
1846 25 August First Christian mission is founded by Johann Ludwig Krapf
1850 Africa is being mapped by Europeans
1895 United Kingdom takes over East Africa

The East African Protectorate begins[6]

1900 Koitalel Arap Samoei predicts railway completion[7]
1901 George V is Kenya's new mornarch
1903 The Ugandan Railway is completed[8]
1905 Nairobi is BEAC's new capital
1909 Witchcraft is illegal in East Africa[9]
1914 Kenya is one of British military bases for World War I[10][11]
1920 BEAC is transformed to Kenya Colony & Uganda Colony[12]

Young Kikuyu Association (renamed the East African Association) started by Harry Thuku.

Kikuyu Central Association formed[13]

Sir Edward Northey becomes the first Kenyan ruler (governor)[14]

1944 Kenya African Study Union is founded by Harry Thuku
1947 Jomo Kenyatta is new president of Kenya African Union
1952 Multiracial pattern of quotas allowed

Mau Mau Uprising begins[15]

1953 8 April Kenyatta is jailed[16][17]
1962 KANU-KADU coalition government is formed

Mau Mau Uprising ends[18]

1963 12 December Kenya Receives Independence[19]

Kenya transforms into a commonwealth

Jomo Kenyatta becomes Kenya's first Prime Minister serving Elizabeth II

Malcolm MacDonald becomes Kenya's last Colonial governor[20]

1964 Kenya transforms into a republic

Jomo Kenyatta becomes President of Kenya

1967 East African Community formed

Kenyan pro-divisions founded

1969 Tom Mboya assassinated[21]
1973 The Lokiriama Peace Accord is signed by Turkana people and Matheniki of Uganda[22]

Lufthansa Flight 540 crashes

1974 Re-election occurred
1977 Rhamu incident occurs
1978 Jomo Kenyatta dies[23]

Daniel Arap Moi becomes new Kenyan President

1980 Garissa massacre takes place
1982 Kenya becomes a one party state

The General Service Unit is formed

1984 Wagala Massacre occurs committed by Kenyan troops
1987 Kenya hosts All African Games
1991 Parliament repeals one party section of the constitution
2002 62% rejects KANU's presidential candidate

Moi becomes longest served president of Kenya's history[24]

2007 Kenya Violence Begins[25]
2009 the UN Secretary general Kofi Annan handed names of the main suspects of the 2007 Post-election violence to the International Criminal Court[26]
2012 First LGBT pride event held in Kenyan US embassy[27]

George Saitoti and Orwa Ojode are killed in a deadly helicopter crash[28]

2013 Kenyan General Elections are held where Uhuru Kenyatta won the election[29]
2015-2016 A Huruma building collapses, where over 100 are affected[30]

Garissa University attacked by gunmen, killing 140 and wounding 65[31]

2017 Kenyan General Elections are held but annulment occurs,[32] then proceeds in 26 October

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Olorgesailie, Kenya | The Smithsonian Institution's Human Origins Program". humanorigins.si.edu. Archived from the original on 9 May 2017. Retrieved 30 April 2017.
  2. ^ "Bantu Migration". myElimu | Discussions For Briliant [Sic?] Students. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  3. ^ "East Africa's Swahili Coast | African World Heritage Sites". www.africanworldheritagesites.org. Archived from the original on 13 May 2017. Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  4. ^ Says, Armaan (15 December 2011). "The History of the Vasco da Gama Pillar". Kenya Travel Sites. Archived from the original on 29 April 2017. Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  5. ^ Centre, UNESCO World Heritage. "Fort Jesus, Mombasa". whc.unesco.org. Archived from the original on 2 June 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Kenya - The East Africa Protectorate | history - geography". Encyclopedia Britannica. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  7. ^ "Koitalel Museum: Visit hero's tomb to learn rich history of the". Daily Nation. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  8. ^ "The Kenya-Uganda Railway - How the Railroad Shaped Kenya | MaCleKi | Curating Kisumu". MaCleKi | Curating Kisumu. Archived from the original on 9 May 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  9. ^ Richard D. Waller, "Witchcraft and Colonial Law in Kenya." Past & Present 2003 (180): 241–275.
  10. ^ "World War One: Kenya's forgotten heroes". BBC News. 19 August 2014. Archived from the original on 10 March 2018. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  11. ^ "Misremembered history: the First World War in East Africa | British Council". www.britishcouncil.org. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  12. ^ "British East Africa Protectorate | Enzi". www.enzimuseum.org. Archived from the original on 6 May 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  13. ^ "Crisis and Achievement: Kikuyu Central Association". Crisis and Achievement. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  14. ^ "2. British Kenya (1920-1963)". uca.edu. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  15. ^ "Mau Mau (1952-1960) | The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed". www.blackpast.org. Archived from the original on 19 May 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  16. ^ "Kenyatta jailed for Mau Mau uprising - Apr 08, 1953 - HISTORY.com". HISTORY.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  17. ^ "BBC ON THIS DAY | 8 | 1953: Seven years' hard labour for Kenyatta". news.bbc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 9 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  18. ^ "Mau Mau uprising: Bloody history of Kenya conflict". BBC News. 7 April 2011. Archived from the original on 23 September 2018. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  19. ^ Network, The Learning. "Dec. 12, 1963 | Kenya Gains Independence". The Learning Network. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  20. ^ "Interviews with Malcolm John MacDonald". www.bodley.ox.ac.uk. Archived from the original on 5 December 2017. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  21. ^ ""Who Killed Tom Mboya? Declassifed Documents Raise New Questions about the 1969 Assassination of Visionary Nationalist Tom Joseph Mboya" by Kantai, Parselelo - New African, Issue 563, July 2016 | Online Research Library: Questia". www.questia.com. Retrieved 30 April 2017.
  22. ^ App, Daily Nation. "TURKANA: How 40-year deal has created peace haven in volatile". Retrieved 17 May 2017.
  23. ^ App, Daily Nation. "AUGUST 22, 1978: End of an era as Mzee Jomo Kenyatta dies". Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 28 April 2017.
  24. ^ "BBC News | AFRICA | Moi's golden handshake". news.bbc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 18 November 2016. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  25. ^ Brownsell, James. "Kenya: What went wrong in 2007?". www.aljazeera.com. Archived from the original on 5 May 2017. Retrieved 30 April 2017.
  26. ^ "BBC NEWS | Africa | Annan acts on Kenya poll suspects". news.bbc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  27. ^ "US Embassy Gives Kenya Its First LGBT Pride Event". 27 June 2012. Archived from the original on 23 May 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  28. ^ Press, TOM ODULA, Associated. "Helicopter crash: Kenya govt minister among 6 dead". sandiegouniontribune.com. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  29. ^ Patinkin, Jason (9 March 2013). "Uhuru Kenyatta wins Kenyan election by a narrow margin". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 13 June 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  30. ^ "Over 150 affected after building collapses in Huruma". Daily Nation. Archived from the original on 30 October 2017. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  31. ^ "Kenya university attack kills 147". BBC News. 3 April 2015. Archived from the original on 29 June 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  32. ^ "Court annuls Kenya presidential election". BBC News. 1 September 2017. Archived from the original on 29 May 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2017.

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