Transportation in Alabama

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Transportation in Alabama
Overview
Transit typeRapid transit, commuter rail, buses, private automobile, Taxicab, bicycle, pedestrian
Operation
Operator(s)Alabama Department of Transportation

The transportation system of Alabama is a cooperation of complex systems of infrastructure.

Background[edit]

History[edit]

Mass transit use and car ownership[edit]

Environmental and social issues[edit]

Commuting/modal split[edit]

Transit systems[edit]

Rail[edit]

Bus[edit]

Roads and freeways[edit]

Bridges and tunnels[edit]

Private automobiles[edit]

Taxis[edit]

Pedestrians, and bicycles[edit]

Highways[edit]

Alabama is criss-crossed by many major roadways.

Interstate Highways[edit]

Current

U.S. Highways[edit]

State Highways[edit]

Port Infrastructure[edit]

Seaports[edit]

The Port of Mobile, Alabama's only saltwater port, is a busy seaport on the Gulf of Mexico with inland waterway access to the Midwest by way of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. The Port of Mobile is currently the 9th-largest by tonnage in the United States.[1]

Barge transportation in and out of the Port of Tuscaloosa and other commercial navigation make the Black Warrior River useful in the state of Alabama.

Airports[edit]

Current, future and proposed projects[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES" (PDF). U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Waterborne Commerce Statistics. p. 90. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-08-07. Retrieved 2010-03-08.