Special routes of U.S. Route 301

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U.S. Route 301 marker

U.S. Route 301
Highway system

A total of at least six special routes of U.S. Route 301 exist and at least eleven have been deleted.

Existing[edit]

Statesboro bypass[edit]

US 301 Bypass.svgGeorgia 73 Bypass.svg

U.S. Highway 301 Bypass
LocationStatesboro, Georgia
Length6.9 mi[1] (11.1 km)
Existed1993[2][3]–present

U.S. Route 301 Bypass (US 301 Byp.), also signed as SR 73 Bypass, is a four-lane bypass of US 301. It travels south-to-north in the southern and eastern parts of the city of Statesboro. US 301 Byp., along with US 25 Byp., makes up the Veterans Memorial Parkway, which forms a near circle around the city.

The bypass begins in the southwestern part of the city at the intersection with US 25/US 301/SR 73, as well as US 25 Byp./SR 67 Byp. It travels southeast and east along the perimeter of Georgia Southern University. It follows the perimeter of the university, turning northeast towards Fair Road (SR 67), where it breaks off from the university perimeter and turns northward. Here, SR 67 Byp. ends, while US 301 Byp./SR 73 Byp. continues. After turning north, the bypass intersects Northside Drive (US 80/SR 26), SR 24, and finally US 301/SR 73.

The Veterans Memorial Parkway was commissioned in 1993.[2][3] Both US 25 Bypass and US 301 Bypass were completed at the same time as two-lane highways.[citation needed] Several years later, US 25 Byp. was widened to become a four-lane divided highway.[citation needed] In March 2007, work began on the widening of US 301 Byp.[citation needed] The bypass was completed in October 2008.[citation needed]

US 301 Bypass, commonly referred to simply as "the bypass",[citation needed] has become one of the most congested roads in Statesboro.[citation needed] The widening of the road, which was supposed to be completed by 2006, was not completed due to a faulty contractor.[citation needed] A new contractor was hired by the Georgia Department of Transportation, and work began in March 2007.[citation needed] The bypass has become an attractive place for new businesses, and has been crucial in the growth and expansion of the greater Statesboro area.[citation needed]

Florence truck route[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Truck
LocationFlorence, South Carolina

Rocky Mount business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationRocky Mount, North Carolina
Length7.5 mi[4] (12.1 km)
Existed1960–present

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1960 as a renumbering of US 301A through downtown Rocky Mount, via Church Street and briefly on Tarboro Road.[5]

Halifax business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationHalifax, North Carolina
Length1.1 mi[6] (1.8 km)
Existed1960–present

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1960 as a renumbering of US 301A through downtown Halifax, via King and David Streets.[5]

Petersburg alternate route[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Alternate
LocationPetersburg, Virginia
Length2.7 mi[citation needed] (4.3 km)
Existed1950–present
View south along US 301 Alt. in Petersburg

U.S. Route 301 Alternate is an alternate route of US 301 through Petersburg, mostly running along South Sycamore Street. It begins at a three way intersection from Crater Road (US 301) and Walnut Boulevard which veers diagonal to the left as Sycamore Street. Before reaching downtown Petersburg, US Alt. 301 crosses Interstate 85/US 460 with no access. In the downtown area, it joins northbound US 1, eastbound Business US 460 and SR 36 on a concurrency along Wythe Street while southbound US 301 Alt. uses Washington Street on a one-way pair. Alt. 301 turns left onto Adams Street along with US 1 and ending at Bank/Bollingbrook Streets (US 301).[citation needed]

Bowling Green business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationBowling Green, Virginia
Length1.7 mi[7] (2.7 km)
Existed1970–present
US 301 Bus. northbound at SR 2 and SR 207 Bus. in Bowling Green

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1970, it replaced the old mainline US 301 through downtown Bowling Green, via Richmond Turnpike, Main Street, and Broaddus Avenue.[citation needed]

Former[edit]

Dade City truck route[edit]


U.S. Highway 98-301 Truck
LocationDade City, Florida
Existed1980s–2007

Truck U.S. Route 98-301 was a truck bypass of the concurrency of U.S. Routes 98 & 301 in Dade City, Florida. The road is also unsigned State Road 533. In February 2007, this section was converted into the main branch of the US 98-301 concurrency.

Dade City business route[edit]


U.S. Highway 98-301 Business
LocationDade City
Existed1980s–2007

Business U.S. Route 98-301 was the main line of the concurrency of U.S. Routes 98 & 301 in Dade City, Florida until February 2007. The road was also unsigned State Road 35, State Road 39, and State Road 700. SR 39 shields turned up during an FDOT resurfacing project of the former route.

Ocala alternate route[edit]


U.S. Highway 301 Alternate
LocationOcala-Citra, Florida
Existed1970s–1981

U.S. Route 301 Alternate in Ocala is now County Road 200A. It was also former State Road 200A. The first segment is named 20th Street and begins at US 301 in Ocala north of a railroad bridge. Upon reaching Northeast Eighth Road, former US ALT 301 becomes Jacksonville Road, a street name it carries until it terminates with US 301 in Citra.

Sylvania business loop[edit]

U.S. Highway 301 Business
LocationSylvania, Georgia
Existed1970[9][10]–2017[8]

U.S. Route 301 Business (US 301 Bus.), the one segment of SR 73 that's not concurrent with US 301, was a business route of US 301. It began at the US 301/SR 21/SR 73 Loop bypass around western Sylvania. The highway, which was named West Ogeechee Street curved northeast in front of a former segment of the road which also leads to a former segment of SR 21, then passes\d the northbound frontage road for the Sylvania Bypass. It traveled straight northeast and southwest along random commercial development until it curved to the east and encountered the intersection of SR 21 Bus. (Mims Road) with turning ramps at both the northwest and northeast corners. The SR 21 Bus./SR 73 concurrency begins and the two highways travel to the east for just over 2,000 feet (610 m), part of which uses a bridge over a railroad line.

The road divided before approaching Main Street and City Hall, where SR 21 Bus. turns south on South Main Street, while SR 73 turns north on North Main Street. Main Street itself is divided by a town green from Telephone Avenue to halfway between Ogeechee Street and W.T. Sharpe Drive, while East Ogeechee Street becomes an unmarked city street. After the intersection with W.T. Sharpe Drive, SR 73 branches off to the northeast, while Singleton Avenue branches off to the northwest. North Main Street becomes much more rural north of here, and is sparsely lined with large suburban houses, although one local lawn mower dealership can be found on the southwest corner of SR 73 and Habersham Road across from Torrington Road. Two more local intersections are passed before the route encounters the frontage the Sylvania Bypass once again, and SR 73 rejoins US 301 on its way to South Carolina, while SR 73 Loop ends.

When SR 73 Loop was established in 1970, US 301 was routed onto it. US 301's former path through the city (on SR 73) was redesignated as US 301 Bus.[9][10] In 2017, it was decommissioned.[8]

Lumberton alternate route[edit]

U.S. Route 301A
LocationLumberton, North Carolina
Existed1954–1960

U.S. Route 301 Alternate (US 301A) was established around 1954, it replaced the old mainline US 301 through downtown Lumberton, via Second Street and Pine Street. In 1960 it was renumbered to US 301 Business.[11]

Lumberton business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationLumberton, North Carolina
Existed1960–1971

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1960 as a renumbering of US 301A through downtown Lumberton, via Second Street and Pine Street. Sometime on April, 1971, it was decommissioned, leaving NC 42 and NC 72.[5][12]

Fayetteville alternate route[edit]

U.S. Route 301A
LocationFayetteville, North Carolina
Existed1952–1960

U.S. Route 301 Alternate (US 301A) was established around 1952, it replaced the old mainline US 301 through downtown Fayetteville, via Gillespie Street and Clinton Road. In 1960 it was renumbered to US 301 Business.[11]

Fayetteville business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationFayetteville, North Carolina
Existed1960–1975

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1960 as a renumbering of US 301A through downtown Fayetteville, via Gillespie Street and Clinton Road. On January, 1975, it was decommissioned.[5][13]

Wilson alternate route[edit]

U.S. Route 301A
LocationWilson, North Carolina
Existed1957–1960

U.S. Route 301 Alternate (US 301A) was established around 1954, it replaced the old mainline US 301 through downtown Wilson, via Goldsboro Street and Herring Avenue. In 1960 it was renumbered to US 301 Business.[11]

Wilson business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationWilson, North Carolina
Existed1960–1963

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1960 as a renumbering of US 301A through downtown Wilson, via Goldsboro Street and Herring Avenue. In 1963 it was decommissioned; partly replaced by NC 42 along Herring Avenue.[5]

Elm City business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Business
LocationElm City, North Carolina
Length3.0 mi[14] (4.8 km)
Existed1960–1970

U.S. Route 301 Business was established in 1960 and followed the old mainline route of US 301 through Elm City, via Elm City Road, before its bypass was built in 1958. On November, 1970, it was decommissioned.[5][15]

Rocky Mount alternate route[edit]

U.S. Route 301A
LocationRocky Mount, North Carolina
Existed1954–1960

U.S. Route 301 Alternate (US 301A) was established around 1954, it replaced the old mainline US 301 through downtown Rocky Mount, via Church Street. In 1960 it was renumbered to US 301 Business.[11]

Halifax alternate route[edit]

U.S. Route 301A
LocationHalifax, North Carolina
Length1.1 mi[6] (1.8 km)
Existed1952–1960

U.S. Route 301 Alternate (US 301A) was established around 1952, it replaced the old mainline US 301 through downtown Halifax, via King and David Streets. In 1960 it was renumbered to US 301 Business.[11]

Delaware truck route[edit]


U.S. Route 301 Truck
LocationMount Pleasant-State Road, Delaware
Length15.02 mi[17] (24.17 km)
Existed1980s–2001[16]

U.S. Route 301 Truck was a truck bypass of a segment of U.S. Route 301 in New Castle County, Delaware. It was created in the 1980s to provide a truck bypass of the St. Georges Bridge for US 301 when structural issues with the bridge forced a weight restriction. U.S. Route 301 Truck followed Delaware Route 71 and Delaware Route 896 north from US 301 in Mount Pleasant. It then crossed over the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal on the Summit Bridge. The truck route continued north on DE 896 to Glasgow, where it turned east on U.S. Route 40 and followed it to State Road, where it ended at U.S. Route 13 and U.S. Route 301. In 1992, US 301 was realigned to head north over the Summit Bridge to end at US 40 in Glasgow. This rerouting made Truck US 301 obsolete, however signs remained until 2001 along US 40.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Google (13 January 2019). "Overview map of US 301 Byp. (Statesboro, Georgia)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 13 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1993). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1993–1994 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  3. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1994). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1994–1995 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  4. ^ Google (9 April 2011). "US 301 Bus - Rocky Mount" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 9 April 2011.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "NCRoads.com: U.S. 301". Retrieved 30 January 2013.[unreliable source]
  6. ^ a b Google (9 April 2011). "US 301 Bus - Halifax" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 9 April 2011.
  7. ^ Google (9 April 2011). "US 301 Bus - Bowling Green" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 9 April 2011.
  8. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (2017). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (2017–2018 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  9. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1970). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  10. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  11. ^ a b c d e "NCRoads.com: U.S. 301-A". Retrieved 30 January 2013.[unreliable source]
  12. ^ "US 301 Route Change (1971-04-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. 1 April 1971. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  13. ^ "US 301 Route Change (1975-01-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. 1 January 1975. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  14. ^ Google (30 January 2013). "US 301 Bus - Elm City" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  15. ^ "US 301 Route Change (1970-11-05)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. 5 November 1970. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  16. ^ U.S. Highway 301 Delaware @ AARoads URL accessed 21 August 2007
  17. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 March 2009. Retrieved 7 March 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) DelDOT 2006 Traffic Count and Mileage Report

External links[edit]