United States Association of Former Members of Congress

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United States Association of Former Members of Congress (FMC)
United States Association of Former Members of Congress Logo.jpg
Founded1970
AffiliationUnited States Congress
Key peopleMartin Frost, President

Charles Boustany, Vice President[1]

Office locationWashington, D.C.
CountryUnited States
Websitehttp://usafmc.org/

FMC, the Association of Former Members of Congress is a non-partisan, non-profit organization of over 500 former Members of the United States Congress.[2]

History[edit]

The United States Association of Former Members of Congress was founded in 1970 as an alumni organization,[3] eventually becoming chartered by The United States Congress in 1983 under Chapter 703 of Title 36 of the United States Code.[4]

Objectives and activities[edit]

The objectives of the United States Association of Former Members of Congress, which it seeks to achieve through its various programming, are (i) promoting and educating about public service and The United States Congress, (ii) strengthening representative democracy and (iii) keeping members connected after service.[5][6]

Of the Association's various programming, the Congress to Campus program has been executed for over 35 years, through a partnership with the Stennis Center for Public Service Leadership.[7][8][9]

The Association is also involved in the International Election Monitors Institute, which is a collaboration with the Canadian Association of Former Parliamentarians and the European Parliament Former Members Association to aid democracy building around the world.[10]

The Congressional Study Groups[edit]

FMC is home to The Congressional Study Groups. The Congressional Study Groups are independent, non-partisan international legislative exchanges committed to increasing bilateral and multilateral dialogue with the United States’ strategic allies."[11] There are currently Congressional Study Groups on Germany (formed in 1983), Japan (formed in 1993), Europe (formed in 2012) and Korea (formed in 2018). The four Study Groups bring together current members of the U.S. Congress, and their staff, with government officials, members of civil society, students and other stakeholders to collaborate on transatlantic and transpacific issues between the United States and its trade partners and allies. Leadership of The Congressional Study Groups, such as Tom Petri[12] and Connie Morella[13][14] have received awards from foreign governments for their work in supporting bilateral relations.

Leadership[15][edit]

Executive Committee:

Board of Directors:

Phil Gingrey, Tim Hutchinson, Tim Petri, Bob Clement, Donna Edwards, Nick Rahall, Barbara Comstock, Tom Davis, Charles W. Dent, Dennis Ross, Vic Fazio, Bart Gordon, David Skaggs, Albert Wynn, Jim Coyne, Ken Kramer, Jeff Miller, Randy Neugebauer, Ed Whitfield, Byron Dorgan, Elizabeth Esty, Jim Matheson, Jim Moran, Karen Thurman, Barbara Kennelly, Jim Slattery, Dennis Hertel, Larry LaRocco, Matt McHugh, Jack Buechner, Connie Morella, Cliff Stearns.

Co-Chairs of The Congressional Study Groups[16]:

References[edit]

  1. ^ USAFMC Website: [1]. Retrieved 12-02-2016.
  2. ^ United States Association of Former Members of Congress, [2]. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  3. ^ United States Association of Former Members of Congress, [3]. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  4. ^ Title 36 of the United States Code: Organization, [4]. Retrieved 2014-07-10.
  5. ^ Shepard, Robert. "The Congressional Alumni Association." The Bryan Times 14 May 1987: Page 4. Print.
  6. ^ Title 36 of the United States Code: Purposes, [5]. Retrieved 2014-07-10.
  7. ^ Dewhirst, Robert E., and John David. Rausch. "United States Association of Former Members of Congress." Encyclopedia of the United States Congress. New York: Facts On File, 2007. 516. Print.
  8. ^ Popkey, Dan. "LaRocco Returns to House to Speak on 'Congress to Campus' Program." Idaho Statesman. N.p., 17 July 2014. Web. [6]. Retrieved 07-18-2014.
  9. ^ Stennis Center for Public Service Leadership, [7]. Retrieved 07-18-2014.
  10. ^ "International Election Monitors Institute | CAFP-ACEP". exparl.ca. 2014. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  11. ^ United States Association of Former Members of Congress, [8]. Retrieved 2014-07-08.
  12. ^ http://www.fdlreporter.com/story/news/local/2014/11/03/petri-receive-japans-second-highest-civilian-honor/18411543/
  13. ^ http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/__pr/P__Wash/2013/07/05-Award-Morella.html
  14. ^ http://www.us.emb-japan.go.jp/english/html/pressreleases/2016/order-of-the-rising-sun-morella-and-nau.html
  15. ^ Congressional Record: July-16-2014, Page H6311, [9]. Retrieved 07-18-2014.
  16. ^ "Congressional Study Groups". FMC. Retrieved 2019-06-06.