User talk:Badagnani/Archive 9

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Italian-American Journalists

Hi, I just happened across the CFD for Wikipedia:Categories_for_discussion/Log/2007_July_9#Category:Italian-American_journalists, and I agree that this was wrongly decided for a variety of reasons. (I.e., purely descriptive facts related to race do not equal racism, there are professional associations of journalists by ethnicity, etc.) I see useful categories deleted constantly, and frankly I'm sick of it. The main problem I see is that very few wikipedians put categories on their watchlists, so a small subset of people (who seemed to have a reflex towards "delete as unencyclopedic") have a disproportionate say in how CFDs turn out. I'd like to see both a deletion review for these categories, and somehow address the larger problem of useful categories being deleted without potentially interested parties ever people informed. If you have any comments or suggestions on either matter, please post them at my talk page. I'm also contact a few other people to join the discussion, feel free to invite others yourself. Thanks. --Osbojos 20:23, 16 July 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for all your hard work...

on south East Asian articles. It's always good to meet another editor working in this area - we're a damn rare breed :) I've added the Khmer script to Kuyteav as you requested in Khmer unicode. Let me know if you think a small jpeg would be better. For future reference, this tag {{Khmer}} adds a Khmer script request when placed on an article talk page. Cheers and keep editing! Paxse 02:32, 18 June 2007 (UTC)

What's the tag for your new needkhmer template? This will deprecate the old Khmer tag but make language tagging it part of the current system. So, the old one should probably go. I'll talk to the author and probably replace the old tags with the new. Paxse 04:19, 18 June 2007 (UTC)

Sweet noodle sauce, not yellow sauce

The practice of using mantou as an ingredient is for sweet noodle sauce, not yellow sauce. The practice is not unique to the Beijing region, but also in some other parts of northern China such as northeastern China. Depending on the methods, mantous usded can be either dried or wet, but in all cases, the mantous used are ground, though the final sizes may vary from region to region, or even from one manufacturer to another.

Yellow sauce is more common in northern China than the south, and it is produced by directly fermenting soy beans, and depending on different regions, fermented soy beans may also be added for some styles of manufacturing (i.e. adding what was left over after fermentation of soy beans in the soy sauce production). Other ingredients of yellow sauce is more or less the same as in sweet noodle sauce. The taste of yellow sauce is salty instead of sweet as in sweet noodle sauce. Traditionally, just like a great brand of sweet noodle sauce should get its sweetness not from sugar, but the fermentation of the starch, a good brand of yellow sauce should get not gets its salty taste from salt added, but from the fermented soy beans and other ingredients.

For traditional Beijing cuisine, yellow sauce is used for zhajiang mian instead of sweet noodle sauce. --—Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.170.136.227 (talkcontribs)

Re:D and dz

No, it's just a spelling some use to prevent foreigners from mispronouncing the name. DHN 22:47, 18 June 2007 (UTC)

This practice is done for an international audience, thus I don't think it's necessary in a discussion about Vietnamese only. Z is not a valid Vietnamese letter. DHN 04:27, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

Re:Nhân sư

The Chinese characters for "nhân sư" are , it's used only for the Egyptian sphinx. Apparently, the Chinese term for the sphinx is zh:狮身人面像. I thought it looked more like a kỳ lân (qilin). DHN 01:57, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

That picture was taken in Hangzhou, China. I'm no expert on Chinese mythical creatures, but I assume that all Vietnamese mythological creatures come from Chinese mythology. DHN 02:19, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

Mrs. Dash

Thanks for flushing out the article - it'd been bothering me when writing about Dash on a forum and not having a wiki page to link to, so I just put a simple one up, but you're really taking to the task! Way to go! Alvis 06:24, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

User:Sumple

Just letting you know that User:Sumple is no longer active. He left the project after becoming frustrated about some other editors. enochlau (talk) 07:34, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

Doh!

Right you are, thanks. Reviewing my pictures, that was clearly a sanjo gayageum, and I had better relabel the pictures on Commons appropriately. Of course this means we are still rather short on geomungo pictures, alas. -- Visviva 08:43, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

Black bean paste

Yellow sauce is the common name used. I don't know about in southern China, but in northern China, particularly for Beijing and northeastern China and their adjacent region, the character yellow comes from yellow bean, since most soy beans are also called yellow beans in China. Hence, the name "yellow bean sauce", but at least in the area mentioned, the term of yellow bean sauce is rarely used, and the sauce is nearly always called yellow sauce.

As for black bean paste 黑豆沙. I have checked the article you provided, which is totally different than the traditional black bean paste of Beijing, Shandong and northeastern China. I cannot say it is wrong because I don't know anything about the black bean paste of other regions in China, and I don't remember and cannot find any info on Oil Bean paste (油豆沙) in traditional Beijing cuisine, because the oil bean paste is common ingredient for Chinese snacks in Jiangsu cuisine and Zhejiang cuisine, not for northern Chinese cuisine. But I might be wrong and thus cannot give any definitive claims on Oil bean paste 油豆沙.

Now, back to black bean paste 黑豆沙, the one in traditional northern Chinese cuisines (though I can only find it in Beijing, Northeastern China and Shandong cuisines):

The ingredient is black soy beans instead of mung beans. In order to make black bean paste, one must first make black bean flour (黑豆面). Traditioanlly, the black beans have to be stir-fried in small iron woks, and the first secret to making good black bean flour (黑豆面) and eventually, black bean paste 黑豆沙 is in this step: one must not over cook the black soy beans. Traditionally, iron wok must be used, not copper or pottery, or any other wok made of other materials, and the wok must be small, since larger wok would often result in the uneven heating/cooking.

After the black beans are cooked, it is ground into flour. These two steps cannot be reversed, because if beans were ground first and then stir fried, the process is much more difficult to control and resulting black bean flour (黑豆面) is not as good as stir frying first and then grinding.

The 3rd step involves preparing potatos, which must be washed and then peeled first. After peeling, potatos will be steamed, and after being steamed, it must be cooled naturally, not in refrigerators.

The 4th step is that after the potatos are cooled naturally, it will be mashed into paste, and then mixed with black bean flour (黑豆面). The ratio usually is 2:1, i.e. for every two oz. of potatos paste, there should be one oz. of black bean flour (黑豆面). Depending on the personal tastes, sugar and other ingredient may or may not be added.

The black bean paste 黑豆沙 is completed by now, though it actually contains more potato paste than black bean paste 黑豆沙, but this is how the traditional black bean paste 黑豆沙 in northern China is made.

Traditionally, the skill of the chef is best shown when he/she can maintain the same taste of black bean paste 黑豆沙 when using different black soy beans and potatos, since different beans and potatos from different regions are different and thus requiring variation of the method to produce the same taste, such as the time of cooking, and ratio of mix, etc.

More on black bean paste

First, thank you very much for the article provided. I apologize for not knowing anything about the sweet black bean paste mentioned in this article, perhaps it is a style in southern China. I cannot find anything online so far, but I will keep trying and if there is anything, I'll let you know, but I doubt it.

For the black bean paste I was talking about, I totally agree with you that if it is to be documented, another name should be used to aviod confusion and make a distinction from other black bean paste. I suggest it is to be called black bean potato paste, which accurately reflects the contents of the paste and I'll use this name in the following discussion.

Traditionally, the black bean potato paste I mentioned was nearly always sweetened, it was only during the late 1990's when healthy diet concept in China became popular was the sugar was starting to be reduced/eliminated. This is the case for northeastern Chinese, Northwestern Chinese Beijing and Tianjin cuisines, but I am not familiar about the practice in other part of northern China, such those regions in central China that is also considered to be part of north China.

In Beijing cuisine, due to its sweetness, the black bean potato paste is never used in Zhajiangmian, and it is rarely used in Zhajiangmian in the northeastern Chinese cuisine either. However, the paste is traditionally used in Baozi (豆沙包) and mooncake like the red bean paste in Southern China.

There is another black bean paste that is identical to red bean paste in the rest of China, utilizing the same material, Azuki beans, and the only exception is that the color of the Azuki beans used is black instead of red, hence, the name black bean paste. Traditionally, this black bean paste and the black bean potato paste are both called black bean paste, indistinguishable from each other by names, but they were distinguishable by price due to the following reasons:

The unit production of potato is higher than that of Azuki bean, so potato is cheaper, and the black bean potato paste is also cheaper than the pure black bean paste that only uses black Azuki beans. The two paste only differ in prices, with the black bean potato paste much more popular among the lower and lower-middle classes.

Redirect of Music of the 1990s

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Oil bean paste 油豆沙

I have checked the edit on Tianmianjiang (sweet noodle sauce). Traditionally, sweet noodle sauce is used in Peking Duck while zhajiangmian only uses yellow sauce for Beijing cuisine, but I have eaten zhajianmian with sweet noodle sauce in Tianjin cuisine, and since Tianjin cuisine has sweet taste in addition to the salty taste of Beijing cuisine.

For Azuki beans, wikipedia is right that other colors in addition to red also exist, such as black, grey, yellow, and spotted. Urad dal is also used traditionally, and like previously discussed, there was no difference in terms of name, but they differ from each other by price and location of production in the traditional ways.

Now, for oil bean paste 油豆沙, I don't know and cannot find any info on southern Chinese style such as the black bean paste in the book you recommanded, but there are more than one oil bean paste 油豆沙 in traditional northern Chinese cuisines:

The first type of oil bean paste 油豆沙 involves the traditional manufacturing process of mooncakes: when water is added to the bean paste to mix with other fillings of mooncakes, the resulting filling of the mooncake is called water bean paste 水豆沙. When oil is added to the bean paste to mix with other fillings of mooncakes, the resulting filling of the mooncake is called oil bean paste 油豆沙.

The second type of oil bean paste 油豆沙 involves the direct traditional manufacturing process of the bean paste itself: After been washed clean, beans such as azuki or mung beans were first soaked in water and duration of the soaking depends on the type of beans itself, for example, mung bean needs 24 hours. After the beans have been soaked, they were first cooked by steaming and then mashed. The last step is that after mashing, the paste/powder is stir-fried. If you want oil bean paste 油豆沙, then add oil during the stir frying.

Traditionally, the oil used was animal fat, but due to health concerns that become more popular in China since late 1990's, vegetable oil is being increasingly used.

The third and last type of oil bean paste 油豆沙 is similar to the southern Chinese ones mentioned in the book you had recommanded, and its preparation is similar to the 2nd type that involves the direct traditional manufacturing process of the bean paste itself, and the difference is in the very last step:

After mashing, instead of stir-frying, the paste is cooked at a lower level of flame/heat with sugar added, until very little water left so a thick paste is formed. This resulting oil bean paste 油豆沙 is served directly as snack, and can also be used as mooncake fillings.

These are the 3 types of oil bean paste 油豆沙 in typical northern Chinese cuisines.

Yes, new page for oil bean paste should be like that of Chatang

1. For sweet noodle paste, even though fermented yellow soybeans (what is left of the soybeans after the fermentation of soybeans into soy sauce) or soybeans might be added, they are not the main ingredients, at least not for traditional sweet noodle paste in northern China. However, fermentation is a must in the manufacturing process.

2. Yellow soybean sauce hasn't been used in Peking Ducks, only sweet noodle sauce is used. I have not found any info of Peking Duck is served with yellow soybean paste and I haven't tasted any Peking ducks served with yellow soybean paste either.

3. It should be indicated that Zhajiang mian of the traditional Beijing cuisine does not use sweet noodle paste, but only yellow bean paste. Also, it should be indicated that in northern Chinese cuisine, the term Zhajiang is rather misleading, because Zha jiang means fried sauce/paste, but in reality, at least for Beijing, Tianjin and Northeastern Chinese cuisines, the paste is stir-fried intead of fried. The sauce/paste is never fried in oil.

4. The black bean potato paste in traditional Beijing cuisine and other northern Chinese cuisines heavily influcened by Beijing cuisine is not fermented, and should not be classified as such. However, it does fall into the sweet bean paste category

5. Agree with you that oil bean paste 油豆沙 should have its own separate page like that of Chatang, but since the 3 kinds were not distinguished traditionally, these are the only names I can think of:

oil bean paste 油豆沙 as mooncake filling, oil bean paste 油豆沙 as snacks, and manufacturing oil bean paste 油豆沙? I'm not sure about the last one, but cannot come up with better names for describing the direct production process of oil bean paste 油豆沙.

The names must be mixed up, or cookery has developed w/ other ingredient added

At least during the 1980's, mantou was not used, or at least, not the major ingredient of the yellow paste. Chinese dictionaries published in that era had clearly stated that only sweet noodle paste used mantou, and only soybeans are mentioned for yellow paste. Check out other culinary dictionary in China published at the time, & here is one:

Title: 简明中国烹饪辞典 Author: 《简明中国烹饪辞典》编写组 Publisher: 山西人民出版社 City: 太原 First published: 1987

I've not been in China lately but from people who did and brought back the vacuum packaged yellow paste in bags, nothing about mantou is mentioned, only soybeans were mentioned as the main ingredients. As far as those travelers knew, they are not aware mantou is the main ingredient either.

In Zhajianmian, the yellow paste is used, just like other northern cuisine, but some Tianjin residents I knew claims that sweet noodle sauce may also be used as an alternative, though not as common as yellow paste.

The color of yellow paste is never yellow, always from light brown to dark brown, even black.

As for mantou used, I do not know if it is similar to bread crumbs, and when I talked to Beijing cuisiine chefs from Beijing, they always told me that how mantou used in the traditional recipes, a trade secret not to be known by others. Again, they confirms that yellow sauce does not use mantou as the main ingredient, though they are not sure some manufacturers would use it in their secret recipes as a suppliment ingredient.

As for Yellow Bean Paste, Huangdoujiang, the name is seldem used to describe the yellow paste we are talking about, at least in Beijing, but I would have to research more on this to see if it the same as huangjiang.

Thank you very much for providing info on 六必居

六必居 is a traditional Chinese pickled vegetable production firm with other traditional Chinese foods, including yellow sauce, which shows mantou is not part of the ingredient.

The term noodle flour also appear in the English translation of yellow sauce of other Chinese firms, and it is just a Chinglish translation that is actually wrong: the correct term is flour, instead of noodle flour because in Chinese, flour is consisted of 2 characters: noodle + powder/flour.

As for 沙 vs. 酱, I had the same question and the answers from chefs and food manufacturers/vendors was simply that was the way it had been for a long time (since Yuan dynasty), and they did not know the exact reason why either.

黄酱 is not a term used for Japanese miso in Chinese, and the two are completely unrelated.

As for Western Hills, it is also part of the underground bunker complex like the Cheyenne Mountain. During Cultural Revolution, a propaganda film in black and white of the underground construction of the complex was shown in the early 1970's after the Sino-Soviet border clashes. The underground tunnel connect the command complex directly to Zhong Nan Hai in the center of Beijing city, and extended to the Great Hall of People at Tiananmen Square. These reports are widely claimed by oversea Chinese and foreign media, but, I can no longer find the film or any other sources from Chinese government to support them after the end of Cultural Revolution. Sources outside China claimed that due to its secrecy, the Chinese government obviously would not release any info. Other info released by the Chinese government regarding the underground complex can be found in publication denouncing former Field Marshal Lin Biao, the western hills underground complex was mentioned occasionally.

干黄酱

干黄酱 is another form of 黄酱 developed for easier transportation / keeping. As the name implied, the dry yellow sauce is drier than traditioanl 黄酱 because the paste has less water in it. When using 干黄酱, water is added to dilute it, and then add to the dish, or directly added to the dish, but water added to the dish should be adjusted accordingly.

It almost sounds like 黄酱 is a type of "doubanjiang" in the way that it can be any shade of colour and that the name "yellow" simply states that it is created from soybeans. Sjschen 07:11, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Could I be so bold and as to suggest a merge? :) Sjschen 07:17, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Interesting, I never knew that, I'll have to check the labels again next time Sjschen 07:26, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Just checked on hot and non-hot versions of dbj for two brands. None of them use broadbeans. I suppose non szechuan regions do not add broadbeans in their production of their dbj. As such, can these dbj be technically considered yellow bean paste? In either case the dbj article will need to be revised. Sjschen 07:30, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

I know that Singapore, Malaysia, and Taiwan use dbj for zjm. I was personally quite surprise to find that people use Tianmienjiang or hoisin sauce of zjm. Sjschen 07:32, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Yeah, the many-different-name-for-one-item and one-name-for-many-different-items aspects of chinese food labeling is certainly annoying. Heck it even happens in Traditional Chinese medicine ingredients too from what I understand. Sjschen 07:42, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Mona (island)

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Hello, this is a message from an automated bot. A tag has been placed on Mona (island), by Flamgirlant (talk · contribs), another Wikipedia user, requesting that it be speedily deleted from Wikipedia. The tag claims that it should be speedily deleted because Mona (island) fits the criteria for speedy deletion for the following reason:

redundant with Mona, which already lists both of the uses here. Or possible redirect?


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Template:Infobox UK place

The above template just calls Template:Location map that does all the clever map stuff. A number of sub-templates are used for different counties. A US sub-template exists and in theory there is no reason why one cant be made for each state. These are just defined by having a map image and marking the longitude/latitude of the extremities in the sub-template see http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Location_map_Greater_Manchester&action=edit as an exmaple. Pit-yacker 19:41, 20 June 2007 (UTC)
Unfortunately, it appears the US versions of the template dont appear to be as widely adopted as the UK ones (although that has a lot to do with the deployment of Template:infobox UK place - there are still almost 1000 transclusions of Template:GBthumb on articles not featuring the infobox). Template:Location map USA was created by User:Obersachse it is used on 3 articles. User:MJCdetroit has created Template:Location map Pennsylvania used on 11 articles. User:Angr has also created Template:Location map New York which is used on around 30 articles; Template:Location map Texas used on 15-ish articles; and Template:Location map California used on 5 articles. Pit-yacker 20:51, 20 June 2007 (UTC)


If I have understood what you are asking correctly, you can call Template:location map directly. For example (apologies for poor layout I can force it to do anything else): {{Location map|Greater Manchester |label= Didsbury |position = right |background =white |lat = 53.416 |long = -2.2311 |border = gray |caption = This is the caption |float = right |width = 200 }}

Would produce the map of Greater Manchester on the right

Didsbury is located in Greater Manchester
Didsbury
Didsbury
This is the caption
  • To use a different map you would just replace "Greater Manchester" with the appropriate other map you wish to use. For example if you wanted to use a map of California (Template:Location map California) you would replace "Greater Manchester" with "California".
    • If you had a map of Florida and wanted to make a map of Florida, you would create a sub-template "Template:Location map Florida" which you could use by replacing "Greater Manchester" in the example above with "Florida"
  • The other parameters are:
    • label puts text next to the point. If you dont want any text just leave it blank
    • position: controls which side of the spot that the label appears
    • background:controls the color of the box around the map
    • lat: is the degrees of latitude in a decimal format (North of Equator is positive, South is negative
    • long: is the degrees of longitude in a decimal format (West of the Greenwich Meridian is negative, East is positive)
    • border: is the colour of the border of thebox surrounding the map
    • caption: controls the caption below the map
    • float: controls where on the screen the map appears e.g. left, or right
    • width: is the width of the map in pixels
    • There are loads of other parameters (imported recently from the Russian version of Wikipedia) that I dont use and are detailed at Template:Location map.

So as another example you could have: {{location map|New York| |label= |lat= 40.778462 |long=-73.968029 |background=0 |border=0 |caption=Location of Central Park |float= left |width=350 }}
Which would give:

Badagnani/Archive 9 is located in New York
Badagnani/Archive 9
Location of Lake Ontario



Or even {{location map|USA| |label= |background=0 |border=0 |lat= 43.470861 |long=-77.044373 |caption=Location of Lake Ontario |float= right |width=350 }}
which would give:

Badagnani/Archive 9 is located in the United States
Badagnani/Archive 9
Location of Lake Ontario



Hope this helps Pit-yacker 15:51, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Re: Mona

That sort of thing is only used when the article has one very major use, and then a few minor uses. For instance, Jesus is an article about the guy, but then Jesus (disambiguation) is about other uses. People who are searching for Jesus most likely want the article about the guy, not the disambig page. The opposite is true regarding Mona, since there is no extremely popular use of "Mona" (at least not yet ;P. Just wait till I name my daughter Mona)--Flamgirlant 22:32, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

Yep, you might want to check out Wikipedia:Manual_of_Style_(disambiguation_pages). Cheers.--Flamgirlant 22:42, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

Sorry, I have no info on Western Hills

The decades old map I had showed that part of it was also in Haidian district, but that was in the 1980's. The adminstrative borders have changed drastically and I do not have any current info. My apology.

Re:Poontalai

When used for seeds, "hột" is the Southern way of pronouncing and writing the word and as such is considered "non-standard" in modern northern-dominated Vietnam. Hột is also typically used for bigger globular-shaped objects, such as eggs, whereas "hạt" can only be used for small grain-sized objects (such as sand and grains of rice). DHN 15:27, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

I'd use hột when speaking but "hạt" when writing. The reason the southern version predominates online is that prior to around the 2000s, most Vietnamese online live outside Vietnam, who are overwhelmingly Southerners. I'm not surprised that some southern items are renamed according to the northern standard. Tân Sơn Nhứt was renamed Tân Sơn Nhất after 1975. When I was in Hanoi last year, I was pleasantly surprised that the Hue specialty bún bò giò heo wasn't renamed as bún bò giò lợn. DHN 01:38, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Re: Mehfil

ﻞﻔﺤﻣ Its been a while I wrote any Urdu. So maybe I am wrong.

Right to Left: M =ﻣ H =ﺤ F =ﻔ L =ﻞ

Asfandyar 00:59, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Flikr photo of sesame chix

Hello, if you want the photo in the article you have to be the copyright holder or the photo has to be released into the public domain or under GPL. You have to upload it to the commons, not just link to flikr, that is a possible copyright violation and will be deleted every time. cheers. 24.185.105.199 01:16, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Sir, you need to stop. I agree with you about improve don't delete and all that, but you are going about it the wrong way. Anything in a wiki article must be released under GPL; since, by your own admission, you are not the rightsholder to the picture you can't release under GPL, ergo, you can't put it in the article. Cheers. 24.185.105.199 01:24, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Re:Eryngium foetidum

It appears that mùi tàu is the so-called "standard" name (only it appears in dictionaries). Ngò gai and ngò tây are Southern names. DHN 01:38, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

3RR block

I have blocked you for 36 48 hours for violation of the three-revert rule on National Security and Homeland Security Presidential Directive. Reverts: [1] [2] [3] [4] The fourth revert is different. The rule indicates: "A revert means undoing the actions of another editor, whether involving the same or different material each time." This is the second block, so it is longer than the normal 24 hours.

I also blocked TDC for 3rr on the same article.--Chaser - T 01:56, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

I've now legthened the block to 48 hours for edit warring on Sesame chicken.--Chaser - T 02:16, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

This blocked user's unblock request has been reviewed by an administrator, who declined the request. Other administrators may also review this block, but should not override the decision without good reason (see the blocking policy). Do not remove this unblock review while you are blocked.

Badagnani (block logactive blocksglobal blocksautoblockscontribsdeleted contribsfilter logcreation logchange block settingsunblockcheckuser (log))


Request reason:

The repeated blanking by anon IP on Sesame chicken was unjustified and I reverted three times, not four. "Fourth revert" at National Security and Homeland Security Presidential Directive actually worked around other editor's comment, which I did not remove, but simply reinserted three words (it was not a revert). Thanks for your consideration.

Decline reason:

I have reviewed this block and decided that it is warranted at this time. Badagnani, please review the 3RR policy during your block, which will not last too much longer. — Alison 23:23, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

If you want to make any further unblock requests, please read the guide to appealing blocks first, then use the {{unblock}} template again. If you make too many unconvincing or disruptive unblock requests, you may be prevented from editing this page until your block has expired.

Harry Caudill publication dates

You asked why there are two publication dates for certain of Caudill's books. The Jesse Stuart Foundation republished Dark Hills to Westward and The Senator from Slaughter County, which were out of print by their original publishers. The convention is to cite the date of first publication, then the place, publisher, and date of the current edition. Otherwise, in Caudill's case, without the first date of publication it would look as if these two books were published posthumously (1994 and 1997, when Caudill died in 1990), which is definitely not the case. Dwalls 05:32, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

FC Bayern Munich Taskforce

Would you like to join a FC Bayern Munich Taskforce at WikiProject Munich? Kingjeff 20:54, 23 June 2007 (UTC)

I guess your not that familiar with soccer over in Europe? Kingjeff 03:36, 24 June 2007 (UTC)

The German teams are not really for profit. All the money goes back into the team. Kingjeff 03:52, 24 June 2007 (UTC)


☑Y

Your request to be unblocked has been granted for the following reason(s):

Autoblock of 24.93.170.200 lifted or expired.

Request handled by: Chaser - T 02:45, 24 June 2007 (UTC)

I think I got it. Let me know.--Chaser - T 02:45, 24 June 2007 (UTC)

Hoax?

Yes, absolutely. I'm horrified that it managed to get transfered to Answer.com, etc. At least we aren't chasing after French, German, Polish and Italian translations of this "article". -- ran (talk) 14:23, 25 June 2007 (UTC)

Double bass

Hi, Thanks for your compliment. The Double bass article has had some rough periods past years, with vandalism, nonsense, OR, and POV self-promotion ("One of the leading and most accomplished modern bassists is ___INSERT OWN NAME HERE____"). When editing arts and music Wiki articles, some days I think there should be a ban on adjectives such as "leading", "acclaimed", and "brilliant"....So many editors want to use all of these words to describe their favorite films, records, and musicians. Another phrase I hate is the weasel word formula "One of the most", as used in the tiresome and empty catchphrases "One of the most acclaimed bassists, XXXX", or "ZZZZ is one of the most acclaimed jazz records in the history of recorded music." AHHHH!!! DELETE, DELETE, DELETE!! : ) Nazamo 20:28, 26 June 2007 (UTC)

I believe it's dalk, as RR is not systematically faithful to pronunciation (which in this case is /tak̚/, if the syllable is used as a freestanding word). There is also an officially-sanctioned variant ("RR transliteration") in which it would be romanized as dalg regardless of context. I'm a bit puzzled by the scope & location of the list, so I posted some questions there. Cheers, -- Visviva 04:20, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for reverts

Just to say thanks for your reverts of vandalism of some of my edits, seems to be related to the external links problem and discussion in Chinese language and related articles. LDHan 04:33, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

Yep

Yep I try to help where I can. There is such an overwhelming number of stuff to add and fix, is scary. Benjwong 06:19, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

Huamei

no idea... -- ran (talk) 14:24, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

Me neither, I did ask one Chinese person and they said that's just the way it's written so I suppose it's not something the average person might know. LDHan 15:21, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

No templates?

I just saw you remove the template out of spare ribs. We don't use templates for American chinese food? I guess I'd like to know before flagging anymore articles as such in the future. Benjwong 19:41, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

I am going to reply on my page to not spread the conversation on 2 pages. Benjwong 19:51, 27 June 2007 (UTC)

The Six Parts Seven

Please explain why Explosions in the Sky should be linked in this article's "See also", and vice versa. Neither of the articles talk about any non-trivial connection between the two bands. –Pomte 02:22, 28 June 2007 (UTC)

Columbia Revolt screenshot

Hi, I created the article on the documentary film Columbia Revolt which you suggested should have a screenshot from the film. I think this is a good idea, but I really know nothing about uploading images to wikipedia, nor about capturing screenshots (image manipulation is very much not my thing, though I should learn a bit about it for wiki purposes). The movie is at archive.org (there are links to it at the bottom of the article) and there it is claimed that the film is in the public domain under the creative commons license, but I don't know if this is sufficient for our purposes. As I said I can't (or don't know how to) capture a screenshot, but there are small thumbnail stills from the film which I could copy and I assume upload, though the quality would not be that great. Any advice here for a major novice when it comes to uploading images, both in terms of copyright issues and getting a decent screenshot from the movie? Thanks!--Bigtimepeace | talk | contribs 07:46, 28 June 2007 (UTC)

Thanks, I'll try to figure something out at some point, though it may take me awhile.--Bigtimepeace | talk | contribs 08:05, 28 June 2007 (UTC)

Fanti/Jianti Question

Hi, Badagnani, I was just wondering if there's any kind of effort underway to standardize the kinds of characters used on zh.wikipedia.org. Some articles are in traditional, some are in simplified, and some--most problematic--have a mixture of both, depending on who's edited which parts. It seems like there should probably be two Chinese language wikipedias, one wtih each type of character. Thanks-- (140.247.10.148 09:38, 28 June 2007 (UTC))

re: your message

Hey, I'm actually the Shanghainese-speaking Australian who worked with you on ume and all that. I've switched accounts because I was being pursued by Dark and Malignant Forces. Hope to work with you in future! --PalaceGuard008 14:47, 28 June 2007 (UTC)

Arturo O'Farrill

Category:Afro-Cuban jazz musicians, which I created, is not for composers and arrangers. He would belong in a different category for that, not the Afro-Cuban jazz musicians category. I will try to come up with something shortly, though Category:Afro-Cuban jazz musicians is only there to house sub-categories of Afro-Cuban jazz musicians by instrument, and should not actually house musicians. If that makes sense. (Mind meal 18:23, 28 June 2007 (UTC))

  • I am sorry i got so hot-tempered in my last edit. I am as committed to accuracy as you are, but I want to categorize people correctly. The musicians category, like all categories, should be "instrumental" specific if you have a category for their INSTRUMENT. I will be editing many Afro-Cuban jazz musicians today, so I hope all goes well. (Mind meal 18:30, 28 June 2007 (UTC))

Masenqo

Hi, I added an infobox to masenqo, which you removed, I'm guessing because the infobox does not allow for an image caption. I do think we should include the infobox as the article falls under the Musical Instruments Wikiproject. The infobox requires an image (actually it requires two images) so I wonder about keeping the photo separate and using (less attractive) placeholders in the infobox, for example see Tanbur/Temp. (Actually I would hope the infobox could be restructured so that images aren't required and captions could be used, but that's something for another day.) -- Gyrofrog (talk) 04:08, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Right, the "no image found" is because the range is a required field, preferably some sort of graphic. I have no idea what the masenqo's range is. Maybe we should wait for better images before adding the infobox. -- Gyrofrog (talk) 05:22, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Re:Tej

It appears to be tej to me, although I can't say so without any doubt. It is usually a bit lighter and more yellowish, but the caption does state that it's unfiltered, which could be the reason for the slight color difference. I'm not familiar with the fruit drink that you referred to, though, sorry. — ዮም | (Yom) | TalkcontribsEthiopia 05:00, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Ah, I should have checked the history. The bottle is the traditional tej bottle and the photo's not particularly high-quality. So let's just stick with that hypothesis. — ዮም | (Yom) | TalkcontribsEthiopia 05:08, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

re:Shanghainese romanisation

Hey, re your inline comment at Song gao: the problem with Shanghainese romanisation is that there's no widely accepted or even widely known system. There are two schemes with articles in Wikipedia: Long-short (romanization), and The latin phonetic method of Shanghainese.

The authenticity and authority of the first is unclear, as can be seen from all the tags at the top.

The second seems better thought out, but there are no references cited, and the external links cast doubt on how wide spread its usage actually is: of the five links, two link to web forums, one is the method's own website, and the last two are one single instance of its implementation on a website.

So basically, there's no real standard, and I don't think Wikipedia should endorse either of these two (nascent) methods by adopting it. What I used to do (e.g. Shengjian mantou) was just to give an ad hoc English approximation. The advantage of that is that readers can get some idea of what it sounds like without knowing IPA; the main problem is lack of precision. This is a problem for many Shanghai-related articles. What are your thoughts? --PalaceGuard008 06:35, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Chinese BBQ sauce

I think I might be better off creating the article so it does not accidentally get taken over. It's 燒烤醬.

Benjwong 16:29, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Vietnam WikiProject

Hi, I saw you were interested; I have posted the proposal at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Council/Proposals#Vietnam_WikiProject Chris 21:24, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Bing

Durned if I know, sorry. There are various similar breads in Korean culture, but I'm really not sure which might be referred to here. Jian bing is literally 전병 (煎餠, jeonbyeong) in Korean, but I'm not sure how congruent the Chinese and Korean uses of the term are. The general class of foods here sounds like what are called jeon in Korea; vide pajeon and kimchijeon; some of these are certainly eaten with seafood (and pajeon is often prepared containing seafood). Actually the picture in the article looks a great deal like hotteok (호떡), but that is a sweet flatbread not closely related to jeon. -- Visviva 08:28, 30 June 2007 (UTC)

A number of articles

There are a number of articles I am tempted use the Chinesename templates for just to make things look simpler. And it can do the multi-language fine also. I just don't know if it is quite appropriate. Red bean paste, lotus seed. Benjwong 23:35, 30 June 2007 (UTC)

Re:Duoi uoi

It appears to be an acceptable alternative, although "duoi uoi" usually refers to the orangutan. DHN 23:57, 30 June 2007 (UTC)

I have no idea. The dictionary doesn't say anything about "luoi uoi", only lists it as an alternative to "duoi uoi", but in the entry for orangutan. There are more hits (from authorative sources) for "luoi uoi" than "duoi uoi" when speaking about the seed. DHN 00:48, 1 July 2007 (UTC)
No mention of the seed/plant. DHN 01:02, 1 July 2007 (UTC)
Most of the links refer to the seed/plant, listing "luoi uoi" as the main name and "duoi uoi" as the alternative name. The situation is reversed when referring to the orangutan. However, they're mostly forum posts, so not very trustworthy. This newspaper article uses "duoi uoi" as the main name, while practically all pages with the scientific name uses luoi uoi. I'd stay with luoi uoi as the main name. DHN 01:16, 1 July 2007 (UTC)


Pho bo

I notice your edit summary for the redundant article Pho bo asking if "this is the same as Phở?" Being a Vietnamese decendant but not the expert of the culture and language, I know it is pretty much the same. "Pho bo" is the beef variation of Pho. There's no point of having a separate article as of now consider the main Pho is not big enough to justified a split. I decided to become a rebel and disregard the merger process and just simply redirect "Pho bo" to the main Pho article. --Souphanousinphone 02:11, 1 July 2007 (UTC)

July 2007 Wikiproject Food and Drink Newsletter

WikiProject Food and Drink Newsletter July 2007--Christopher Tanner, CCC 19:26, 1 July 2007 (UTC)

Image:Oboe musette.jpg

Thanks for uploading Image:Oboe musette.jpg. I notice the 'image' page specifies that the image is being used under fair use, but its use in Wikipedia articles fails our first fair use criterion in that it illustrates a subject for which a freely licensed image could reasonably be found or created that provides substantially the same information. If you believe this image is not replaceable, please:

  1. Go to the image description page and edit it to add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}}, without deleting the original Replaceable fair use template.
  2. On the image discussion page, write the reason why this image is not replaceable at all.

Alternatively, you can also choose to replace the fair use image by finding a freely licensed image of its subject, requesting that the copyright holder release this (or a similar) image under a free license, or by taking a picture of it yourself.

If you have uploaded other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified how these images fully satisfy our fair use criteria. You can find a list of 'image' pages you have edited by clicking on this link. Note that any fair use images which are replaceable by free-licensed alternatives will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you. Mak (talk) 20:31, 1 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Tangyuan

It appears that in Vietnamese, tangyan is called Bánh trôi. It's popular in the North, whereas in the South there is the "bánh trôi nước", made with more sugar and has more coconut milk. According to the Vietnamese Wikipedia, the poet Ho Xuan Huong wrote a poem comparing women's fate to this desert. DHN 23:15, 1 July 2007 (UTC)

That's my guess, although I've only heard of "che xoi nuoc" and don't know what "banh troi nuoc" is. DHN 00:01, 2 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Glutinous rice

It's mentioned in one of the links in the ruou nep article. DHN 23:19, 1 July 2007 (UTC)

I'm not sure what it means in this instance but it normally means coal. DHN 00:03, 2 July 2007 (UTC)

干酱 is short for any dried 酱, not necessarily only for yellow sauce.

Now, for 大酱:

大酱 is a particular sauce of northeastern Chinese cuisine, and it's unique in its traditional manufacturing process:

大酱 only uses salt, soy bean and water.

After soybeans have been washed and cleaned, they would be boiled in water until all of the water is gone. It's very important not to let the soybeans being overcooked, i.e. not be burned.

After that, the beans are mashed into bean paste. The very important critical point in this process is adding water when making bean paste, bean paste would not fermentate fully and properly if there is too little water, but if there is too much water, the bean paste would be rotten.

Next step is to make the bean paste into rectangular shape for first fermentation. Make the rectangular shape into the most common size: around 30 cm long, and 20 square cm2 for the cross section, and let it dry naturally in a cool place without direct sun light and enough air ciruclation. After 3 to 5 days, each piece is wrapped around by paper and placed like it was for the first fermentation.

By Apr. 24 - Apr. 28 of the lunar calendar, the rectangular bean paste pieces should have grown white fugus completely, and they are ready for the process called: 下酱. This is a process include several steps, first of which is to remove the paper wrapping, and then clean off all of the inmpurity on the surface of the bean paste pieces, including the white fugus grown.

After cleaning, the bean paste pieces are cut into small pieces, the smaller the better, and then the diced bean paste pieces are put into earth jar, and this time, the jar is often put right infront of windows traditionally, to get as much sunlight as possible.

In the mean time, salt should be prepared: for every kg of soybean used, half a kg of salt should be used. Note that this is according to the soybean used at the beginning, not the bean paste!

After the salt has been selected, it should be completely melted in water and then mixed into the jars containing the diced bean paste. The important thing in this step is that the water used to melt the salt should be proportional to the diced bean paste piece, for every kg of bean paste, two kg of water should be used. Note that the water used to melt the salt is proportional to the bean paste, unlike the salt, which is proportional to the soybean!

The salt water is then poured into the sauce jar containing the bean paste pieces and the jar is covered with clean white cloth, and let sit for three days.

After three days, it is ready for the next process called 打耙, with a specialized tool called 酱耙子, which is nothing other than a stick with a rectangular or square wooden board attached at the one end:

Every day, the bean paste and salt water mix should be stirred/punched 400 times, 200 in the morning, 200 in the evening. Continue this for a month or so. The bean paste would fermentate for the second time, and this time, the fermentation is in the form of bubbles and creams, which should be rid of during the stirring/punching.

It is important not to over fermentate. Traditionally, the sauce jar is covered with sauce jar hat, which is made of straw, to prevent water and other debris from falling into the sauce jar and at the same time, keep the air circulating.

Images

First off, I apologise for my mistake with Image:Happy Avenue.jpg, where I didn't read the existing tags carefully - thought it was under a fair use claim, not under a public-domain claim as you had stated. Although, I'd feel more at ease if there was actually some evidence of release into the public domain; as you certainly know it's rather uncommon for publicity photographs to be released into the public domain, so forgive me if I retain some doubts here. (the link is currently dead.) - As for the rest, you should know well enough that your fair use rationale in a case like Image:Tenorviolin.jpg is blatantly insufficient; that one is certainly going to be deleted.

I'll leave the bookcovers for now. With your experience with all those fair-use debates, I'm a bit astonished you've been uploading images lacking an explicit rationale, and even more astonished at your aggressive response at the tagging - you surely ought to know that these have to be corrected, that this tagging would come some day, and that by failing to provide a rationale from the start you were only causing yourself and other people unneccesary work. Please don't do that. I'm by no means convinced the rationales as they now stand are convincing, but I have to acknowledge that community consensus in this domain is currently not clear cut.

As for "stalking" - well, I freely confirm that I was led to your contributions because you were listed as a participant in the Abu Badali arbcom case, which I've recently taken an interest in. It's somehow pertinent to understanding why certain people get so upset at Abu if you know what kinds of image uploads they do, don't you think? Fut.Perf. 17:22, 3 July 2007 (UTC)

Bass oboe

I strongly object to your wholesale reversion of my edits to bass oboe.

I am prepared to discuss the edits point by point, but I believe at least some of the changes are clearly needed. The discussion of its tone does not belong at the end of a sentence about its price. The range needs to be clarified by specifying the octave. The mid-article link to a site that sells oboe music is clearly inappropriate, and the subsequent sentence about some student somwhere looking for opportunites to write for bass oboe is out of place. The contrabass oboe information belongs in the contrabass oboe article, not here. I believe reinstating my revision is called for, and if you object to particular items, let's discuss them. -- Rsholmes 17:26, 3 July 2007 (UTC)

PLEASE CEASE AND DESIST YOUR REVERSION OF MY EDIT. IF YOU OBJECT TO ONE OR TWO ELEMENTS OF IT, FINE, LET'S DISCUSS THEM. YOUR REVERSION OF THE ENTIRE EDIT OVER OBJECTIONS TO SMALL PARTS OF IT IS ABUSIVE. WHAT DO YOU NOT UNDERSTAND ABOUT "PLEASE DISCUSS THIS BEFORE REVERTING"? -- Rsholmes 12:52, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Hakka

Hakka are Han Chinese. The Gejia are classified with the Miao according to the Chinese Wikipedia. -- ran (talk) 01:32, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Rapeseed & Sesbania grandiflora

Rapeseed: cải dầu. Sesbania grandiflora: so đủa is official. Other spellings are probably also used, but not official. DHN 06:10, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute

It's a matter of preference. I used the name in the Vietnamese Wikipedia. Some people capitalize every syllable, while others capitalize every word instead. You can use the all-capital letter version if you want. DHN 07:06, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Modern Creative

Hi there. It is not a term many jazz fans are familiar with, surprisingly. Rest assured, it is a legitimate form of free jazz, as is Early Creative. It is basically "no rules whatsoever" jazz.

(Mind meal 17:00, 4 July 2007 (UTC))

  • I'm just trying my best to categorize folks proper. If it is good enough for Scott Yanow and the folks at All Music Guide to highlight some further aspect of the avant-garde, that is good enough for me. Nobody said this is anything other than free jazz. (Mind meal 18:23, 4 July 2007 (UTC))

Xiao Pang

It is done! --Stormie 23:10, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Korean Japanse cuisine

I prepare the category of "Korean Japanse cuisine". Let's stop controverting. --Azukimonaka 19:25, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

In a word, do you agree to the "Korean Japanse cuisine" ? A lot of misunderstandings can be prevented by making this category. And, a lot of controversies can be prevented. --Azukimonaka 19:43, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Kombu and mugicha

Hi, in the case of kombu and mugicha, these are simply the Japanese names for food items that are also authentically Korean and not clearly of Japanese origin. For takuan/danmuji and nori/gim, these are food items of Japanese origin that are extremely popular and important in Korean cuisine, thus have been accepted by Koreans into their cuisine, and thus are part of Korean cuisine. As such, they merit a "Korean cuisine" category to bring our readers to all the foods that are part of the daily lives of Koreans in their cuisine. This is not about national pride but about accurately documenting which foods are consumed and produced in each nation, and part of that nation's cuisine. Badagnani 19:40, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

I don't agree that kombu or mugicha are "Korean Japanese cuisine" or "Japanese Korean cuisine." They are food items produced and consumed as part of the traditional cuisines of both Japan and Korea. As far as I know, takuan/danmuji is a Japanese-produced product but nori/gim is a Japanese invention that has been absorbed into Korean cuisine and used in several Korean dishes. So each ingredient has a different story.

I think that you are wrong of me. Konbu is a tradition dish completed in Japan. And, it was exported to Korea by Japan. And, you should divide Gim from Nori. --Azukimonaka 19:57, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

"Japanese Korean cuisine" is a confusing name because it isn't clear whether this is Japanese food in Korea, Korean food in Japan, or food made by Japanese Koreans. Would it be the equivalent of American Chinese cuisine or Korean Chinese cuisine? Badagnani 19:47, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

So you're saying that the Japanese "own" the genus Laminaria? And you believe nori and gim are not the same food? For the first, I don't agree, and for the second you may be correct, as in my experience nori seems smoother and has less holes than Korean-produced gim. Badagnani 20:00, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Yes. Which "This is Korean food" or "This is Japanese Korean cuisine" do you use when you introduce Takuan? I select "Takuan is Japanese cuisine". --Azukimonaka 20:04, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

  Takuan is a Japanese invention and Japanese-produced product that has been accepted into Korean cuisine as an ingredient in Korean dishes that are not found in Japan. Thus, it merits a category "Korean cuisine" as it's verifiably a very popular and prevalent ingredient in Korean cuisine. As I've explained before. And is explained in the article. Badagnani 20:05, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

I think that Kimuchi is Korean food though a lot of Japanese consume Kimuchi. (Kimchi is not Japanese food). Am I wrong? --Azukimonaka 20:10, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

The question is not whether it's "Korean food" but whether it has become an important part of Japanese cuisine. I don't know enough about how kimchi/kimuchi is used in Japan. Certainly it's used in the Korean cuisine of Japan, but I don't know if Japanese people use kimchi in their own recipes, the way Koreans eat takuan/danmuji in Korean recipes. Badagnani 20:12, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Is the recipe of Takuan of Korea original of Korea? I am searchable of the document of South Korea and Japan. Please write recipe and the history of Takuan in Korea more in detail. --Azukimonaka 20:18, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

I just explained very clearly that takuan/danmuji is Japanese in origin, but adopted as a very popular and prevalent ingredient in Korean dishes. I'm not sure how much more clear I can be about that. Badagnani 21:05, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

No, you are not introducing original recipe of South Korea at all. A lot of Japanese food is being imported by South Korea. Therefore, I think that it should thoroughly talk about this problem. I can offer a lot of information. Let's discuss it. To a thorough target. --Azukimonaka 21:17, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

If you make an article about Japanese cuisine as eaten by Koreans, there should also be one for Korean foods as eaten in Japan (such as kimuchi, bibinba, galubi, etc.). Badagnani 20:04, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

OK. I will make Japanese Korean cuisine and Korean Japanese cuisine. --Azukimonaka 20:07, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

We are not speaking of "original recipe of South Korea" but important items used in Korean cuisine, which danmuji clearly is. Badagnani 21:19, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

A large amount of oolong tea and Mugicha are consumed in South Korea. Why is only Mugicha a South Korea beverage? --Azukimonaka 19:29, 6 July 2007 (UTC)

I suggest that "roasted barley tea" be the new article name (in English), and that it include both mugicha and boricha as subheadings. For "nori" and "gim" I think two separate articles would work, as the two products aren't made in exactly the same way. Badagnani 22:36, 6 July 2007 (UTC)

It is correct to introduce Mugicha and boricha in roasted barley tea. And According to my investigation, Kim is Nori that painted oil. And, it is original of Korea. --Azukimonaka 10:08, 7 July 2007 (UTC)

Image:Vidovszky.jpg

For your information, I tagged Image:Vidovszky.jpg as replaceable fair use. Garion96 (talk) 20:15, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Unspecified source for Image:Adrian_Rollini.jpg

Thanks for uploading Image:Adrian_Rollini.jpg. I noticed that the file's description page currently doesn't specify who created the content, so the copyright status is unclear. If you did not create this file yourself, then you will need to specify the owner of the copyright. If you obtained it from a website, then a link to the website from which it was taken, together with a restatement of that website's terms of use of its content, is usually sufficient information. However, if the copyright holder is different from the website's publisher, then their copyright should also be acknowledged.

As well as adding the source, please add a proper copyright licensing tag if the file doesn't have one already. If you created/took the picture, audio, or video then the {{GFDL-self}} tag can be used to release it under the GFDL. If you believe the media meets the criteria at Wikipedia:Fair use, use a tag such as {{non-free fair use in|article name}} or one of the other tags listed at Wikipedia:Image copyright tags#Fair use. See Wikipedia:Image copyright tags for the full list of copyright tags that you can use.

If you have uploaded other files, consider checking that you have specified their source and tagged them, too. You can find a list of files you have uploaded by following this link. Unsourced and untagged images may be deleted one week after they have been tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If the image is copyrighted under a non-free license (per Wikipedia:Fair use) then the image will be deleted 48 hours after 20:41, 5 July 2007 (UTC). If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you. Abu badali (talk) 20:41, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Images...

Hi, Badagnani. I have tagged some images you uploaded as replaceabl, as they are being used solely to illustrate what a living person looks like. The images were:

It seems there are other images you uploaded that still need to be deleted. Would you consider running through your logs and tagging any non-free images of living people with {{db-author}}? That would save a lot of images cleaning work.

I noticed that all of these images are tagged as promotional material, although no necessarily the images came from a press kit or similar source. Please, notice that not every image found on the internet is intended to be reused by the media.

Also, I nominated for deletion the following images:

You will find a link to the deletion discussions on the respective image's description pages.


Please, let me know of any problems. Best regards, --Abu badali (talk) 21:19, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Arabic

The Arabic language is more complex than other languages. The Arabic language uses a system of harakat, which are sort of like directions (or representations) for the pronunciation of vowels. It's quite complex; for example, a word always has two different pronunciations as an object and as a subject in the sentence. One haraka (sing.) is the damma, like in فُ, which is pronounced fu or fo. Doghmush has a damma between the d and the gh (دُغمش) and another one between the m and the sh (so it is دُغمُش). Of course, it might just be a representation of the way it is commonly pronounced in the Palestinian Arabic dialect. —Anas talk? 23:55, 5 July 2007 (UTC)

Image:Roberto Fabbriciani with hyperbass flute.jpg

Information.svg Welcome, and thank you for contributing to Wikipedia. An image you have uploaded, Image:Roberto Fabbriciani with hyperbass flute.jpg, was marked as having been released under a free license by the copyright holder, but no evidence of this release has been provided. If notice of the release is on the copyright holder's website, please link to it in the image summary. If the release is a response to a request for copyright permission, the full request and response must be forwarded to OTRS. If you need help in composing a request, the example requests for permission may be helpful. Thank you. ShakespeareFan00 15:50, 6 July 2007 (UTC)

Apologies, If you have permission great. However for various reasons it usually advised at such releases are lodged with the OTRS system, that way if anyone kicks up a fuss, there is an official record of the 'release'. Please feel free to ask an administrator for more assistance or explanation. ShakespeareFan00 17:55, 6 July 2007 (UTC)

Can you translate this dish of Beijing cuisine and add an English article to Wikipedia?

酥鱼特点:鱼酥汁甜,枣红发亮。小鲫鱼2500克。配料:莲菜1500克,大葱、大姜各250克,花椒50克。醋500克,白糖750克,料酒250克,盐50克,小磨油250克,酱油200克。 制法:1、鲫鱼去鳞、去鳃、去内脏,洗净沥去水份。莲菜洗净截成节,去掉皮,切成5毫米厚的片。 2、锅垫洗净,放在砂锅内,把切好的莲菜在锅垫上摆一层,鲫鱼头向外,摆在莲菜上;再放一层莲菜和葱段、姜片,这样一层莲菜一层鱼和葱、姜,逐层摆完。 3、把糖撒在摆好的鱼上,将作料加水对成汁,倒入砂锅内约2/3深。4、把砂锅放旺火上,沸起后,移至小火上收汁。汁少时,将留下的汁陆续加入,约两小时,把小磨油用花椒炸一下,淋入砂锅内。约四个小时左右,汁浓、色红、鱼酥、莲菜烂甜时,将锅端离火口,晾凉把汁滗出,拾入扒盘内,把汁浇到鱼上即成

Re:Food

Can you identify any other ingredients or are those the only ones in this chè? DHN 05:35, 7 July 2007 (UTC)

I have no idea what it is. I've asked over at the Vietnamese Wikipedia. I'll let you know if someone answers. DHN 01:35, 8 July 2007 (UTC)

Red liquors, flowers, and shark fin soup

Liquor: I'm pretty sure that the drink is not any traditional baijiu. Instead I think it's some sort of Chinese invented "Western aperitif". As such, it could be anything, including mouthwash.

Flowers: Ah, another "tea ball". Barring the amount of labour and sweat that goes into making these things, they have got to be the most ridiculously priced things. All that said I have no idea what that red flower actually is, though I would assume any non-poisonous flower can be used. I've seen chrysanthemum and straw flowers used as the center bloom. On the other hand the little white flowers everywhere else are osmanthus.

Shark fin soup: The word "soup" is not is included because in many cases it is assumed to be in a broth or liquid of some kind. As a highly priced delicacy, there are a limited number of "correct" ways of cooking shark fin. If there are exceptions to the cooking, it will be described as additional parameters in the name. For instance if cooked in a thick soup with other stuff it will be called something "yu2 chi4 geng1", if semi-dry cooked in the "red-cooked" fashion, it will be "hong2 shao1 yu2 chi4", so on. Sjschen 17:11, 7 July 2007 (UTC)

If you think it would help them, then do inform them so :) Sjschen 17:23, 7 July 2007 (UTC)

Tip

Here's a good tip for you: sometimes you can get the Arabic script from the Arabic Wikipedia interwiki link, if there is one. Thanks, Anas talk? 17:36, 7 July 2007 (UTC)

re: photos in Misua article

If the photos are helpful, perhaps they should be uploaded to Wikipedia? I am uncertain as to the licensing of the photos, so I leave it up to you for now. I am going to remove the photo from the tripod.com site because, as a hotlinked photo, it does not show up (only the tripod.com logo shows up).

--Lmblackjack21 23:50, 8 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Xoi vi

I've never heard of it, but it appears to be a type of xoi. DHN 06:49, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Ali_Farka_Toure.jpg

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Thanks for uploading or contributing to Image:Ali_Farka_Toure.jpg. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in Wikipedia articles constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use. Suggestions on how to do so can be found here.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to ensure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If you have uploaded other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on those pages too. You can find a list of 'image' pages you have edited by clicking on the "my contributions" link (it is located at the very top of any Wikipedia page when you are logged in), and then selecting "Image" from the dropdown box. Note that any non-free media lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you. MER-C 12:44, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

莲菜 = 藕 (lotus root)

莲菜 is another name for 藕 in some parts of China, but I don't know exactly where.

Image:tsbook.jpg

Regarding this image in the Trichy Sankaran article that you attempted to restore, it's not visible on Wikipedia:Images and media for deletion/2007 May 27 because that IFD log page had been pared down to only those images that needed a little more effort to determine. However, Image:tsbook.jpg had been accidentally omitted. You can find it in the page history, however. Regards, howcheng {chat} 20:44, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

[5] is the link you need to see the deletion nomination. howcheng {chat} 22:04, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Nguyên Lê

It's a different name. Nguyên is a somewhat uncommon male given name. My grandfather's name was Nguyên, and his surname was Nguyễn. DHN 06:19, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

We agreed on standardizing on one template

Hi. Please see Wikipedia talk:Manual of Style (China-related articles). We agreed on standardizing on one template as Template:Chinesename will get deleted eventually. Benjwong 06:43, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

Can we please continue the conversation at Wikipedia talk:Manual of Style (China-related articles). Benjwong 06:48, 10 July 2007 (UTC)
If we focus the talk on one page Wikipedia talk:Manual of Style (China-related articles) that is probably best. Benjwong 06:55, 10 July 2007 (UTC)
Can you please join the conversation at the page. If you do not bring up your concern it is just a bunch of editwars. That would waste time, effort and wiki resources. Benjwong 07:04, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

Orphaned non-free image (Image:Chris Murray.jpg)

Nuvola apps important blue.svg Thanks for uploading Image:Chris Murray.jpg. The image description page currently specifies that the image is non-free and may only be used on Wikipedia under a claim of fair use. However, the image is currently orphaned, meaning that it is not used in any articles on Wikipedia. If the image was previously in an article, please go to the article and see why it was removed. You may add it back if you think that that will be useful. However, please note that images for which a replacement could be created are not acceptable for use on Wikipedia (see our policy for non-free media).

If you have uploaded other unlicensed media, please check whether they're used in any articles or not. You can find a list of 'image' pages you have edited by clicking on the "my contributions" link (it is located at the very top of any Wikipedia page when you are logged in), and then selecting "Image" from the dropdown box. Note that any non-free images not used in any articles will be deleted after seven days, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. Thank you. BetacommandBot 21:24, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

Orphaned non-free image (Image:Lukas Ligeti.jpg)

Nuvola apps important blue.svg Thanks for uploading Image:Lukas Ligeti.jpg. The image description page currently specifies that the image is non-free and may only be used on Wikipedia under a claim of fair use. However, the image is currently orphaned, meaning that it is not used in any articles on Wikipedia. If the image was previously in an article, please go to the article and see why it was removed. You may add it back if you think that that will be useful. However, please note that images for which a replacement could be created are not acceptable for use on Wikipedia (see our policy for non-free media).

If you have uploaded other unlicensed media, please check whether they're used in any articles or not. You can find a list of 'image' pages you have edited by clicking on the "my contributions" link (it is located at the very top of any Wikipedia page when you are logged in), and then selecting "Image" from the dropdown box. Note that any non-free images not used in any articles will be deleted after seven days, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. Thank you. BetacommandBot 21:33, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

Stalking

Badagnani, what with everybody throwing round accusations of stalking or canvassing or whatnot left and right these days, I must say I find your series of edits [6], [7], [8], [9] veering dangerously towards stalking of Quadell. Please consider yourself warned. Fut.Perf. 07:47, 11 July 2007 (UTC)

Truth is a defense. Mosquera 07:59, 11 July 2007 (UTC)

¡Hola, Badagnai!

Thank you for your support. I really appreciate it. I hope you understand how Wikipedia really works: policy does not apply to administrators. When one of them decides to start picking on you, you either move out of the way or stand up and hold them accountable. If you do the latter, el patrón will find an excuse to ban you. You can't really win. You can only delay defeat. Buenos noches, Mosquera 07:59, 11 July 2007 (UTC)

And, of course, thank you for the barnstar. Mosquera 17:28, 12 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Trứng cút

Trứng = egg, cút = quail. DHN 17:13, 12 July 2007 (UTC)

Non-free use disputed for Image:Korea Girl.jpg

Image Fair use rationale problem

Thanks for uploading Image:Korea Girl.jpg. However, there is a concern that the rationale you have provided for using this image under "fair use" may be invalid. Please read the instructions at Wikipedia:Non-free content carefully, then go to the image description page and clarify why you think the image qualifies for fair use. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to ensure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If it is determined that the image does not qualify under fair use, it will be deleted within a couple of days according to our Criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you. Seraphimblade Talk to me 20:05, 12 July 2007 (UTC)


Rationale Pal

Use this template with music ---> Template:Album cover fur. -Mosquera

Anthony_Brown.jpg

I have tagged Image:Anthony_Brown.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page. MER-C 09:01, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

重装

Sorry can't help with this one. LDHan 13:01, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

Would it be "re-install" (if in a technological context)? But depends on the context, I guess. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 08:00, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

Red bean paste

It seems to be 팥앙금, although interestingly this isn't what Korean dictionaries recommend as translations for the Japanese/Chinese terms (they recommend 팥소 or 적두함, neither of which seem to be used much by anyone but lexicographers). You may want to check Google images to see if it looks like the stuff you're familiar with. 팥앙금 is used in bungeoppang, but I'm given to understand that patbingsu uses the actual (softened) beans rather than bean paste. Hope that helps... Cheers, -- Visviva 18:40, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

党参

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Hello, this is a message from an automated bot. A tag has been placed on 党参, by Angus Lepper (talk · contribs), another Wikipedia user, requesting that it be speedily deleted from Wikipedia. The tag claims that it should be speedily deleted because 党参 fits the criteria for speedy deletion for the following reason:

unused redirect page


To contest the tagging and request that administrators wait before possibly deleting 党参, please affix the template {{hangon}} to the page, and put a note on its talk page. If the article has already been deleted, see the advice and instructions at WP:WMD. Feel free to leave a message on the bot operator's talk page if you have any questions about this or any problems with this bot, bearing in mind that this bot is only informing you of the nomination for speedy deletion; it does not perform any nominations or deletions itself. --Android Mouse Bot 2 19:26, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

Greetings Badagnani, and thanks for salvaging the other Chinese character redirects also tagged for speedy deletion. On a tangentially related note, you may enjoy the premise behind this website: [10] . Cheers, --Fire Star 火星 20:41, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Taro

According to [11], colocasia esculenta is "KHOAI NƯỚC" or "môn nước". "Khoai môn" probably refers to its root. DHN 19:57, 13 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Pho

Rau refers to leafy greens. Chay is generally translated as "vegetarian" but has a different meaning. It specifically refers to the Buddhist diet. That's why when you told the person in the store that you ăn chay, he replied with the Buddhist greeting. DHN 07:31, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

I guess it's possible. But with pho rau, you can't be sure that it complies with the strict Buddhist vegetarian diet (i.e. it might have vegetables as its main ingredient, but the broth might be made with meat), while with pho chay, you can be sure that it's "kosher" to eat. DHN 07:35, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

Image:Asie_Payton.jpg

I have tagged Image:Asie_Payton.jpg as {{no rationale}}, because it does not provide a fair use rationale. If you believe the image to be acceptable for fair use according to Wikipedia policy, please provide a rationale explaining as much, in accordance with the fair use rationale guideline, on the image description page. Please also consider using {{non-free fair use in|article name}} or one of the other tags listed at Wikipedia:Image copyright tags#Fair_use. Thank you. MER-C 10:43, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

Tangyuan

Yup most likely that's what they are. I had a look at the Tangyuan article, and I'm doubting the statement about unfilled balls being called "tangyuan" and filled ones being called "yuanxiao". In my experience, tangyuan is synonymous with yuanxiao, and you can have filled and unfilled tangyuan, which can equally be called filld and unfilled yuanxiao. It could be a matter of dialects again.

There's a legend concerning Yuan Shikai about where the different terms come from: "yuanxiao" sounds like "Yuan [is] destroyed/gone", so Yuan Shikai, upon proclaiming himself Emperor of China, banned the use of the term in favour of "tangtuan".

RE: your inline comment at Tangyuan: the "yuan" in Tangyuan means "round", so Tangyuan means something like "round balls in soup". By contrast, Yuanxiao is an etymologically unrelated term from Yuanxiao Jie, or the Lantern Festival, which is when Tangyuan was traditionally eaten. This "yuan" means "first", and "yuanxiao" means something like "first (full moon) night". Hence the different characters. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 11:44, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

Dashi photos

I added some dashi photos and removed the image request tag. --—Preceding unsigned comment added by Franzeska (talkcontribs)

Category:Hard-bop organists

This category is a subcategory of Category:Hard-bop musicians by instrument which is a subcategory of Category:Hard-bop musicians, which also has a link to the List of hard bop musicians I created. No issues concerning getting lost. I create categories when I find a musician that falls into that category, which is how one populates categories. Trust me, this category will fill up over time. Try to have a little more patience, I created the entire Category:Jazz musicians by genre and all of it's subcategories and lists (basically). Have a little faith. (Mind meal 01:11, 16 July 2007 (UTC))

I understand your argument, but that is overcategorization. Actually, as things stand there should be NO musicians at Category:Jazz organists at this time. Notice the Category:Jazz organists by genre there. Over time, they will all be properly categorized according to genre. Besides, 95% of all jazz organists play hard bop and soul-jazz anyway. (Mind meal 02:04, 16 July 2007 (UTC))
Oh I didn't say that, I said most organists play soul-jazz AND hard bop. I couldn't disagree with you more about simply having "national" subcategories. Those are worthless. I guess we see this differently, I like to know about musicians who perform in similar styles that I have grown to like. If I were to go to Amazon and they had jazz musicians listed by "nationality" only, I'd leave. That is unacceptable for a medium with so many variants. And, we do have a Category:Jazz organists by nationality also at Category:Jazz organists, so that information is available anyway. PS: The organ in jazz is uncommon? That is news to me. Or did you mean hard bop is uncommon? That also is new to me. (Mind meal 02:11, 16 July 2007 (UTC))

Re:cà

Cà refers to some plants in the Solanaceae family (and some others), including cà chua (Lycopersicum esculentum), cà cuồng (Lethcerus indicus), cà độc dược (Datura metel), cà gai leo/cà cườm/cà quánh/cà vành (Solanum hainanense)...According to [12], it refers to the Solanaceae family. DHN 04:50, 17 July 2007 (UTC)

Cà by itself usually refers to the most famous member of the Solanaceae family, cà chua. DHN 05:13, 17 July 2007 (UTC)
There are also cà phê (coffee) and cà rốt (carrot), but they're just borrowed foreign words that happens to sound like cà in Vietnamese. DHN 05:14, 17 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Ton That

I don't know much about it, but there are probably enough information about it out there to warrant an article. DHN 06:57, 17 July 2007 (UTC)

WikiVietnam Project

Thank you for your Vietnam-related articles and for your invitation to Vietnam Project. I'm glad to join this project. Could you please tell me when can I find the list ? Thank you.Genghiskhanviet 01:49, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:CD cover

Hi there!

Regarding the image I deleted:

The bot that tagged the image notified the uploader.

That itself is actually irrelevant. The problem is that if you upload an album cover, you the uploader must provide the source. I do my best to fix deletion taggings as I come across them[13], but if the uploader does not provide the source I cannot help. Feel free to reupload- just cite the source and the albumcover license, and it is good to go!

Thank you for contacting me, Keegantalk 05:00, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

By the way, by permissions of the album cover license, the image was being used inappropriately in the article on the artist herself. Keegantalk 05:02, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

See, here's the thing with that. I did not get excited, I did not do anything wrong. I see that you are the uploader and the bot may not have notified you. Apologies for the inconvenience.

What the issue involves a manner of law. As a free content encyclopedia, the image that you provided under the appropriate license must be sourced. Not because I demand it, but because US federal law demands it. Just reupload the image and specify the source. It is an easy fix, one that I would have done on my own had I known the source. You can fix it, and there is no trouble. I will not be undeleting the image. Feel free to post at Deletion review or at the incident noticeboard if you have further complaints. There my actions may be reviewed by others. Keegantalk 05:10, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

Okay, plain text, follow me here
This is the page for the image:

Summary Surashri Kesarbai Kerkar. Album cover for "Golden Milestones" CD that is described in the Surashri Kesarbai Kerkar article. Licensing {{Non-free album cover}}

No source. A source is demanded of unfree images. An album cover must only be used to illustrate the album in question.
Reupload the image with your source and the image is fine. I will not undelete, and as I said you may take your complaint to the appropriate forum if you feel so strongly. Once again I'm sorry if this is a surprise to you but it is easily rectified. Happy editing to you. Keegantalk 05:18, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

Hrmmm

I would honestly like you to understand where I'm coming from. When I clean image backlogs, I actually take the time to look at them. Many admins just delete. The one thing I look for is a source. If there is no source, the image is in violation of the Foundation and the law. Bottom line. I understand if you do feel hurt that there was no notice- heck, bot notices of impending deletion usually upset users more than you are at me.

Bottom line is that the image was tagged on July 3 and no source has been provided. I'm not descritioned or inclined to notify the image uploaders when I do these deletions. I'm sorry if that offends you, but the amount of admin work does not really allow for that. What I try to do is be civil and best explain that I undertook my actions because they are proper and correct in context.

All you have to do is reupload the image. I cannot do that for you.

Regards, Keegantalk 05:30, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

A handshake to you sir. There was no notice to you, but there was no source. We have both screwed up. Keep up the good work. Keegantalk 05:37, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

Any last comment?

If you have any last comment on standardizing on Template:Chinese, please go to Wikipedia talk:Manual of Style (China-related articles). Otherwise Template:Chinesename might get deleted eventually without your concent. Benjwong 22:22, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

Deletion Review

I just created a deletion review for Wikipedia:Deletion_review/Log/2007_July_19#Category:Jewish_American_comedians. I thought I would alert you to it in case you'd like to comment. --Osbojos 22:48, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

There's something weird happening there. The Wikipedia Deletion review page is currently listed in the nonexistent category "Jewish American comedians". I suspect something in the discussion may have tripped the record of the review page as being in the deleted category. But being a new editor of very little brain, I can't make head nor tail of how it happened or whether it should be fixed. You might like to check it out. -- Duae Quartunciae (t|c) 01:45, 20 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Daikon

trắng (white). củ=bulb, tuber, cải=cabbage. "trang" makes no sense in this context. DHN 04:46, 20 July 2007 (UTC)

According to the Vietnam encyclopedia and other governmental sources, raphanus sativus is "cải củ". DHN 05:00, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
Beats me. DHN 05:13, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
You didn't find any in the linked Google search? Which sites were you looking at? Are you sure they're referring to raphanus sativus and not something else? DHN 05:46, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
"củ cải" sounds like it's referring to the tubers, while "cải củ" sounds like it's referring to the plant. Since most uses of the plant is the tubers, it's naturally that "củ cải" would be used more often. DHN 05:55, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
Try "(cây) cải củ". DHN 06:33, 20 July 2007 (UTC)

Huyue

Yes, that was the alias. -- ran (talk) 15:21, 20 July 2007 (UTC)

Jeff Greenfield

Hello Badagnani and thank you for taking the time to contact me.

First of all, please allow me to apologize for just getting back to you now. As you may have noticed, I'm currently on vacation and doing a bit of traveling and, therefore, do not always have Internet access. If I may, I would also like to explain the recategorization process in a bit more detail.

You are correct in assuming that I, or rather one of the bots I operate, has removed the category Category:Jewish American journalists from all articles. As you know, the reason for this was the discussion the bot linked to in its edit summary which you I see you participated in. As you are aware, this discussion was closed by an administrator who determined consensus as 'upmerge as nominated'. Afterwards, the category was listed at the bot's workpage where it was picked up by my bot.

Since the category was only listed as an 'upmerge' and not as a multi-target merge (ie. like you describe), all the articles in Category:Jewish American journalists were merged to its parent category as determined by the closing admin. As you may have noticed, I almost never participate in these discussions myself (I do follow them though) as there's a good chance that my bot will end up doing the recategorization work. The point I'm trying to make, however, is that it's really the closing administrator who determines what gets done. I do check for obvious mistakes (typos and so on) but I really don't make any decisions as to what gets moved where. I guess you could say that, in that respect, my role is that of an assistant to the janitor.

If you still feel that the upmerge should have been carried out as a multi-target merge, your best bet is really to contact the closing administrator directly. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at my talk page though. Hope you have a great weekend.

Cheers,

S up? 14:54, 21 July 2007 (UTC)

Hello Badagnani,
thanks for your message. I'm afraid you misunderstood me and I'd like to try to address your concerns. What I was trying to say is basically this: as you know, Wikipedia works on consensus. Consensus is determined by the administrators closing a XFD discussion. That's why I typically don't participate in CFD discussions - I often end up moving or even effectively deleting the categories under discussion and I feel it would be improper to be involved both, in the discussions and in the maintenance aspect.
The proper place to note such concerns is, then, at WP:CFD where the closing administrator can examine them and take them under consideration. And while I do some checks, I do not second-guess the closing administrator. If he or she determines that there is consensus for a simple upmerge, that's what I will do. Likewise, if he or she determines that a category's contents should be merged to two or even more categories, no problem. I never let my personal opinion affect the (maintenance) work I do on Wikipedia and - feel free to ask anyone who knows me - I certainly don't have a problem with admitting that I am only human and that I do make mistakes. To be frank, I don't feel like this is the case here.
The thing is, however, it's not my place to second-guess an administrator's judgement. If you wish to challenge a decision, your best bet is to talk to the closing admin and not to the guy who takes care of the janitorial aspects. I have renamed categories back to their original names in the past -- it's not something I have any problem with whatsoever if the closing admin agrees it's a good idea and gives me the go-ahead. S up? 11:14, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Curry

Since it's a foreign borrowing, either is acceptable. DHN 19:56, 21 July 2007 (UTC)

Notability of Duk

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Hello, this is a message from an automated bot. A tag has been placed on Duk, by Agamemnon2 (talk · contribs), another Wikipedia user, requesting that it be speedily deleted from Wikipedia. The tag claims that it should be speedily deleted because Duk seems to be about a person, group of people, band, club, company, or web content, but it does not indicate how or why the subject is notable: that is, why an article about that subject should be included in an encyclopedia. Under the criteria for speedy deletion, articles that do not assert the subject's importance or significance may be deleted at any time. Please see the guidelines for what is generally accepted as notable.

To contest the tagging and request that administrators wait before possibly deleting Duk, please affix the template {{hangon}} to the page, and put a note on its talk page. If the article has already been deleted, see the advice and instructions at WP:WMD. Feel free to leave a message on the bot operator's talk page if you have any questions about this or any problems with this bot, bearing in mind that this bot is only informing you of the nomination for speedy deletion; it does not perform any nominations or deletions itself. --Android Mouse Bot 2 21:56, 21 July 2007 (UTC)

Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/The latin phonetic method of Shanghainese

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I detect some cynicism on your part regarding my actions in this AfD ("I see no reason why an editor might want to hide an article about this romanization system from other WP users.")

The reason I nominated this article for deletion is because it is non-notable - it's an interesting proposal, but it is quite recent (begun in 2001) has had no official recognition, is not commonly used, and has only a limited online presence.

The material was originally inserted into Shanghainese, but deleted by a fairly experienced user on the subject (User:Wtzdj): [14]. For a taste of just how non-notable this scheme is, the original content opened with "The Latin phonetic method of shanghainese seeks international supports." (see diff above).

One of my concerns is that the presence of this page on Wikipedia misleads other users into thinking that this is a common, or the most common, romanisation scheme for Shanghainese, when it is anything but -- as happened during the Template:Chinese discussions.

I didn't notify the creator (and other editors) of that page because, judging by their edit history, they all appear to be single-purpose or short-term accounts, created specifically to create and/or edit this article, and then abandoned. But I have now notified the two non-anon user accounts who edited the page. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 02:09, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Mạch nha

Mạch nha (麦芽), according to the dictionary I consulted, means "malt". I am not familiar with this so I can't help you there. According to this encyclopedia, maltose is "đường mạch nha" (i.e. malt sugar) and scientifically known as "MANTOZƠ". DHN 05:05, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

None of those links seem to be equating "mạch nha" with maltose. DHN 05:31, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
Since malt can also refer to the sugar rich in maltose, I guess the usage is similar in Vietnamese. I'm not familiar with this concept so I don't have a definite answer. DHN 05:57, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

Duk

Hi,

It was originally a redirect created by you, pointing first to Mochi and then to Mochi (food). It was later turned into a stub about a non-encyclopedic rapper, which was deleted under A7. There wasn't really anything to salvage in the history, so I just re-created it as a redirect to tteok, of which it is a common alternate spelling. The relationship between mochi and tteok may need to be addressed at some juncture, but absent an authoritative work on East Asian culinary history, methinks it would be best to just handle them as separate but related food types. -- Visviva 09:02, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

Replaceable fair use Image:KotatoDoubleContrabassFlute.jpg

Replaceable fair use

Thanks for uploading Image:KotatoDoubleContrabassFlute.jpg. I notice the 'image' page specifies that the image is being used under fair use, but its use in Wikipedia articles fails our first fair use criterion in that it illustrates a subject for which a freely licensed image could reasonably be found or created that provides substantially the same information. If you believe this image is not replaceable, please:

  1. Go to the image description page and edit it to add {{di-replaceable fair use disputed}}, without deleting the original Replaceable fair use template.
  2. On the image discussion page, write the reason why this image is not replaceable at all.

Alternatively, you can also choose to replace the fair use image by finding a freely licensed image of its subject, requesting that the copyright holder release this (or a similar) image under a free license, or by taking a picture of it yourself.

If you have uploaded other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified how these images fully satisfy our fair use criteria. You can find a list of 'image' pages you have edited by clicking on this link. Note that fair use images which could be replaced by free-licensed alternatives will be deleted 7 days after this notification, per our Fair Use policy. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you. — Carl (CBM · talk) 20:45, 22 July 2007 (UTC)

AN/I discussion

Please see this discussion on WP:AN/I regarding actions by User:Ultramarine. Thank you.--Jersey Devil 01:37, 23 July 2007 (UTC)

Comment restoration on WP:AN/I

I have restored comments that appear to have been mistakenly removed by you in this edit. Best regards, Navou banter 02:28, 23 July 2007 (UTC)

Dear Navou, yes, the comment removal was entirely inadvertent--I think I must have been reading an earlier edit, then responded without going back to the newest edit first. Thanks for noticing, and for letting me know (though you didn't have to let me know; you could've just restored the comments I mistakenly blanked). Thanks in any case, Badagnani 03:58, 23 July 2007 (UTC)

No prob... usually if I edit another editors edit, I'll let them know, it saves time in case there is confusion about my intent. Cheers! Navou banter 04:05, 23 July 2007 (UTC)

Standardizing templates

Hi, we have fixed all your major concerns with Template:Chinese. I think we are going to standardize real soon if you want to leave any last comment at Manual of Style.

Benjwong 06:03, 23 July 2007 (UTC)

Deletion Review for Category:State terrorism

Hi, I saw your name in the edit history for State terrorism and thought you'd probably like to weigh in on this discussion:

Wikipedia:Categories_for_discussion/Log/2007_July_17#Category:State_terrorism.

Note that it opened on July 17, so there's not much time left to comment. Cgingold 13:32, 23 July 2007 (UTC)

Just want you to know

It seems like you are not reading my comments (as well as others').

The following table shows many templates designed for easier creation of templates. As you can see, they use #CCF as the default header color. WikiProject Korea has never agreed upon using #CCF as its distintive colour, it was simply the default. So, you might want to stop arguing that Korea has been associated with #CCF, or vice versa.

Navigation templates comparison
Collapsible Header color Image Groups Style (body)
parameter/s
Examples
{{Navbox}} collapsible navbox Left/right of body Yes Yes
{{Navbox with collapsible groups}} collapsible navbox Left/right of body and/or in each list Yes Yes
{{Navbox with columns}} collapsible navbox Left/right of columns No Yes
Collapsible attributes
Type CSS classes JavaScript Collapses when Custom
initial state
Nesting
Collapsible tables collapsible Defined in Common.js 2 or more autocollapse on page Yes Yes

In addition, #CCF equals #CCCCFF. You might want to read this article. Thanks. eDenE 00:13, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Chinese language template

the changes look fine to me. --ran (talk) 12:38, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Perhaps not necessary, but I don't see the harm of it. -- ran (talk) 21:43, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Category:Native American flautists

Hello Badagnani,

thanks for your message. I will review the matter and talk to the administrator who listed the category rename. If he agrees, I'd be happy to reverse the changes. Cheers S up? 13:53, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

I have just set up my bot to reverse the change and to move the articles back to their old category. Oh, and thanks again for your message. If there's anything else I can do for you, please don't hesitate to contact me. S up? 14:33, 25 July 2007 (UTC)
Okay, the bot is ☑Y Done. S up? 14:41, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Trần

Yes, trần has several meanings, as a surname and a word meaning "to exhibit, display" (陳), a word meaning "dust" (塵, as in "trần gian"), and also an alternative reading of 裎 (trình). "trần" used alone can mean "ceiling", "the surname Trần", and "bare, naked". DHN 18:52, 26 July 2007 (UTC)

West Lake (vi:Hồ Tây pic) is the largest lake in Hanoi. Tay Ho District in Hanoi is named after it. You can see it in this map (northernmost section) and on the this satellite picture. DHN 19:41, 26 July 2007 (UTC)

boiled soybeans in the pod

I'm wondering if you could help me find the appropriate article (or if it exists). There is a traditional Shanghainese/Jiangnan dish, which is young soybeans in the pod, boiled with some flavouring. I've noticed similar dishes in Japanese and Korean restaurants. I couldn't find an article about it on Wikipedia, but thought it might be under a Japanese name. Do you know if there is such an article? --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 01:15, 27 July 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for that! Think I will edit that section a bit. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 01:21, 27 July 2007 (UTC)
From my reading of the ja.wiki article (relying on my high school Japanese, which may not be all that reliable), it seems edamame originally meant "young soybeans", picked before they mature; but because of the prevalence of the salt-boiling method of cooking, it's come to usually signify that dish in particular.
The zh.wiki article on soybeans talks about the dish being long prevalent in China and Japan, before being introduced to Hawaii and thence to the continental United States. It says nothing about whether it went from China to Japan or vice versa.
One popular variation in Chinese dishes is to boil it with (what my dictionary calls) "Distiller's grains" (酒糟) rather than salt.
Anyway, seems to be more information and more questions on this dish than I expected. Might do some research and start a new article. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 01:36, 27 July 2007 (UTC)
I think it's the very highly fermented rice/grains left over from the making of rice wine. It's sold as a solid, but can then be dissolved in water to form a fragrant liquid - the idea is a bit like grappa. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 02:37, 27 July 2007 (UTC)

Image:H-owen-reed-portrait.jpg

I have tagged Image:H-owen-reed-portrait.jpg as {{no rationale}}, because it does not provide a fair use rationale. If you believe the image to be acceptable for fair use according to Wikipedia policy, please provide a rationale explaining as much, in accordance with the fair use rationale guideline, on the image description page. Please also consider using {{non-free fair use in|article name}} or one of the other tags listed at Wikipedia:Image copyright tags#Fair_use. Thank you. Rettetast 11:03, 27 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Thị xã

Thị xã (市社) is an administrative unit in Vietnam, equivalent to a "huyện" (district); it can be translated as "town". Currently, Vietnam is divided into tỉnh (provinces) and thành phố trực thuộc trung ương (centrally-controlled municipalities). The huyện level is one level below the provincial level, similar to a county in the US. A thị xã exists at the same level, and and can be compared to an independent city in Virginia. This diagram will give you an idea where it belongs. DHN 18:06, 27 July 2007 (UTC)

tỉnh lỵ: provincial captial. DHN 00:54, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Jeney.jpg

I have tagged Image:Jeney.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:16, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

CengPhoto2000.jpg

I have tagged Image:CengPhoto2000.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:17, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Cuong_Vu.jpg

I have tagged Image:Cuong_Vu.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:18, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Malcolm_Dalglish.jpg

I have tagged Image:Malcolm_Dalglish.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:18, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Valentin_Clastrier.jpg

I have tagged Image:Valentin_Clastrier.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:19, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Fabien_Cousteau.jpg

I have tagged Image:Fabien_Cousteau.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:19, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Kevin_Klose.jpg

I have tagged Image:Kevin_Klose.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:20, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Michael_Lowenstern.jpg

I have tagged Image:Michael_Lowenstern.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:20, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Joseph_Celli.jpg

I have tagged Image:Joseph_Celli.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:21, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

H-owen-reed-portrait.jpg

I have tagged Image:H-owen-reed-portrait.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:21, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Jeffrey_Mumford.jpg

I have tagged Image:Jeffrey_Mumford.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:21, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Martin_Berkofsky.jpg

I have tagged Image:Martin_Berkofsky.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:22, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Robert_Tree_Cody.jpg

I have tagged Image:Robert_Tree_Cody.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:22, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Min_Xiao-Fen.jpg

I have tagged Image:Min_Xiao-Fen.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:24, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Matthias_Ziegler.jpg

I have tagged Image:Matthias_Ziegler.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:25, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Xun-album_cover.jpg

I have tagged Image:Xun-album_cover.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:26, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

John_Diercks.jpg

I have tagged Image:John_Diercks.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:36, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Mindi_Abair.jpg

I have tagged Image:Mindi_Abair.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:38, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

JazzPassengers.jpg

I have tagged Image:JazzPassengers.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:41, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Nramani.jpg

I have tagged Image:Nramani.jpg as {{replaceable fair use}}. If you wish to dispute this assertion, please add {{Replaceable fair use disputed}} to the image description page and a comment explaining your reasoning to the the image talk page.  But|seriously|folks  01:41, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Possibly unfree Image:Gil_Hermon3.jpg

An image that you uploaded or altered, Image:Gil_Hermon3.jpg, has been listed at Wikipedia:Possibly unfree images because its copyright status is disputed. If the image's copyright status cannot be verified, it may be deleted. You may find more information on the image description page. You are welcome to add comments to its entry at the discussion if you are interested in it not being deleted. Thank you.  But|seriously|folks  01:47, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Possibly unfree Image:LouisRooseveltWhite-1945.jpg

An image that you uploaded or altered, Image:LouisRooseveltWhite-1945.jpg, has been listed at Wikipedia:Possibly unfree images because its copyright status is disputed. If the image's copyright status cannot be verified, it may be deleted. You may find more information on the image description page. You are welcome to add comments to its entry at the discussion if you are interested in it not being deleted. Thank you.  But|seriously|folks  02:04, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Sorry for all the tags!

I'm sorry to leave so many tags on your page. Please don't take it personally. As you may be aware, Wikipedia's policy on nonfree content (a/k/a "fair use") has shifted a bit over time. Many of the above images may have been allowed when you uploaded them, but they are not currently permitted. If you email the copyright holders, as you have done with many Flickr images, you might be able to get permission for their images to remain. Again, I'm sorry for all the tags and I do hope you will continue to contribute images that comply with current policies. -- But|seriously|folks  04:01, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Please be careful with non-free content

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I strongly suggest that you review Wikipedia's current non-free content policies before attaching any more non-free images to articles. Under current policy, for example, we can't use someone's compilation album art to illustrate an article on a genre, unless the compilation is itself the subject or significant portion of the article. We also generally can't use one album cover by an artist to illustrate an article on the artist. (There are exceptions, but I do not believe the images I tagged are covered by these exceptions.)

Also, please do not remove image tags that call for a response, particularly when they state "Please do not remove this tag."

Wikipedia takes copyright issues very seriously. If you continue to willfully violate Wikipedia's copyright policies and procedures, you will be blocked. -- But|seriously|folks  04:21, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Image:Gil_Hermon3.jpg listed for deletion

An image or media file that you uploaded or altered, Image:Gil_Hermon3.jpg, has been listed at Wikipedia:Images and media for deletion. Please see the discussion to see why this is (you may have to search for the title of the image to find its entry), if you are interested in it not being deleted. Thank you. Abu badali (talk) 06:56, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

Your comments at Talk:Malcolm Goldstein

You are misusing the term Wikistalking in an effort to cover up your own transgressions of Wikipedia's image policies. I am clearly entitled to check your contribs for violations. Please take another look at the relevant policy page. Also, I did what you asked and restored the image. I'm not asking you to thank me, but your continuing criticism is neither appropriate nor appreciated. If you want to get a third opinion, feel free to take any of my tags to Wikipedia:Fair use review. -- But|seriously|folks  22:42, 28 July 2007 (UTC)

九豐記

Appears to be a beef noodle restaurant in Taipei. -- ran (talk) 12:40, 30 July 2007 (UTC)


August 2007 Wikiproject Food and Drink Newsletter

WikiProject Food and Drink Newsletter August 2007

--Christopher Tanner, CCC 16:35, 30 July 2007 (UTC)

Tien si

Soorry if I am butting in, but it means doctor in the sense of a doctorate (PhD). Thanks for your ongoing VN work. Blnguyen (bananabucket) 05:10, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Tiến sĩ

Tiến sĩ (進士) was originally a term for someone who passed a certain examination in feudal Vietnam. Nowadays, it refers to someone who has a doctorate (PhD). DHN 06:03, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Its usage is similar to a title in English. Don't capitalize it unless it's used in front of the name of a specific person. DHN 06:10, 31 July 2007 (UTC)
The Chinese translation provided in vi.wiktionary would be read as "bác sĩ" in modern Vietnamese and would be understood as "medical doctor". DHN 06:25, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Re:Xiêm

Siam, Siamese. DHN 06:39, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Thailand is "Thái Lan". Country names ending with "Lan" are usually borrowed from English (perhaps indirectly through Chinese), including Ba Lan (Poland), Tân Tây Lan (New Zealand - no longer used), Ái Nhĩ Lan (Ireland - no longer used), Tô Cách Lan (Scotland - no longer used). DHN 06:53, 31 July 2007 (UTC)
The adjective Thai is "Thái", as in trà Thái (Thai tea), người Thái (Thai people), tiếng Thái (Thai language). DHN 06:58, 31 July 2007 (UTC)
I think it's so genericized now that it's not necessary to capitalize it anymore. DHN 07:26, 31 July 2007 (UTC)
I'm not aware of that; the only things that I know of that are "xiêm" are "dừa xiêm", "vịt xiêm" (duck), "hồng xiêm" (sapodilla), and some other things that came to Vietnam via Thailand. They probably meant "siêu" (super). DHN 07:43, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Wikipedia:Requests for arbitration/Abu badali closed

This arbitration case is closed and the decision has been published at the above link. Abu badali (talk · contribs) is counselled to be more patient and diplomatic with users who question his tagging of images and to work with them in a collaborative way. For the Arbitration Committee, Picaroon (t) 16:24, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Orphaned non-free image (Image:Arabrap.jpg)

Nuvola apps important blue.svg Thanks for uploading Image:Arabrap.jpg. The image description page currently specifies that the image is non-free and may only be used on Wikipedia under a claim of fair use. However, the image is currently orphaned, meaning that it is not used in any articles on Wikipedia. If the image was previously in an article, please go to the article and see why it was removed. You may add it back if you think that that will be useful. However, please note that images for which a replacement could be created are not acceptable for use on Wikipedia (see our policy for non-free media).

If you have uploaded other unlicensed media, please check whether they're used in any articles or not. You can find a list of 'image' pages you have edited by clicking on the "my contributions" link (it is located at the very top of any Wikipedia page when you are logged in), and then selecting "Image" from the dropdown box. Note that any non-free images not used in any articles will be deleted after seven days, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. Thank you. BetacommandBot 19:18, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

My user name

Hi. I saw your comments at House demolition in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I changed my user name to Tiamat from Tiamut after noticing that the Wiki article on her used an "a" rather than a "u". I guess the transliteration of Sumerian isn't standardized yet. :) Anyway, sorry for any confusion. Tiamat 20:03, 1 August 2007 (UTC)

Re:Phạm Văn Hai

Hai appears to be much more common. DHN 20:32, 1 August 2007 (UTC)

Re:vú sữa

It does mean "milk breast". I think there was a legend regarding the name, something about a mother's love for her prodigal son. There are some bizarre names that I have no explanation for: the durian is called "sầu riêng" (private sorrow). DHN 23:48, 1 August 2007 (UTC)