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Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

Each day, a summary (roughly 975 characters long) of one of Wikipedia's featured articles (FAs) appears at the top of the Main Page as Today's Featured Article (TFA). The Main Page typically gets around 15 million hits per day.

TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators: Dank (Dan), Jimfbleak, Ealdgyth and Wehwalt. WP:TFAA displays the current month, with easy navigation to other months. If you notice an error in an upcoming TFA summary, please feel free to fix it yourself; if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, please leave a message at WP:ERRORS so an administrator can fix it. Articles can be nominated for TFA at the TFA requests page, and articles with a date connection within the next year can be suggested at the TFA pending page. Feel free to bring questions and comments to the TFA talk page, and you can ping all the TFA coordinators by adding "{{@TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

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Lector, si monumentum requiris, circumspice.

Today's featured article

David Nutter in 2015
David Nutter

"Ice" is the eighth episode of the first season of the American science fiction television series The X-Files. Premiering on the Fox network on November 5, 1993, "Ice" was directed by David Nutter (pictured) and written by Glen Morgan and James Wong. The debut was watched by 10 million viewers in 6.2 million households and received largely positive reviews from critics, who praised its tense atmosphere. In the episode, FBI special agents Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) investigate the deaths of an isolated Alaskan research team. The agents and their team discover the existence of extraterrestrial parasitic organisms which drive their hosts into impulsive fits of rage. The episode was inspired by an article in Science News about an excavation in Greenland, and series creator Chris Carter also cited John W. Campbell's 1938 novella Who Goes There? as an influence. (Full article...)

Tomorrow's featured article

Adam Eckfeldt Color Painting Ellipse.jpg

Adam Eckfeldt (June 15, 1769 – February 6, 1852) was the second chief coiner of the United States Mint. His father owned a large smithy and involved himself in early attempts at American coinage. Eckfeldt built early presses for the Mint, engraved some of its early dies, and was responsible for some designs of early American copper pieces, as well as the 1792 half disme, which some authorities consider the first United States coin. He was appointed assistant coiner of the Mint in 1796, and became chief coiner after his predecessor's death in 1814. During Eckfeldt's tenure, the Philadelphia Mint moved to new premises and expanded its operations. Setting aside unusual coins that were brought in as bullion, he started the Mint's coin cabinet, which evolved into the National Numismatic Collection. Despite his 1839 retirement, Eckfeldt continued performing the duties of chief coiner until his death, though his successor, Franklin Peale, bore the title. (Full article...)