Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests

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Here the community can nominate articles to be selected as "Today's featured article" (TFA) on the main page. The TFA section aims to highlight the range of articles that have "featured article" status, from Art and architecture through to Warfare, and wherever possible it tries to avoid similar topics appearing too close together without good reason. Requests are not the only factor in scheduling the TFA (see Choosing Today's Featured Article); the final decision rests with the TFA coordinators Dank, Jimfbleak, Ealdgyth and Wehwalt, who also select TFAs for dates where no suggestions are put forward). Please confine requests to this page, and remember that community endorsement on this page does not necessarily mean the article will appear on the requested date.

The rules for nominations are relatively simple:

  • The article must be a featured article. Editors who are not significant contributors to the article should consult regular editors of the article before nominating it for TFAR.
  • The article must not have appeared as TFA before (see the list of possibilities here), except that:
  • The TFA coordinators may choose to fill up to two slots each week with FAs that have previously been on the main page, so long as the prior appearance was at least five years ago. The coordinators will invite discussion on general selection criteria for rerunnable TFAs, and aim to make individual selections within those criteria.
  • The request must be either for a specific date within the next 30 days that have not yet been scheduled (10 spaces), or a non-specific date (4 spaces). If a section is full, you can wait for a vacancy, or ask the coordinators for advice. The template {{@TFA}} can be used in a message to "ping" the coordinators through the notification system.

If you have an exceptional request that deviates from these instructions (for example, an article making a second appearance as TFA, or a "double-header"), please discuss the matter with the TFA coordinators beforehand.

It can be helpful to add the article to the pending requests template up to 1 year before the requested date. This does not guarantee selection, but does help others see what nominations may be forthcoming. Requestors should still nominate the article here during the 30-day timeframe.

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Featured content:

Today's featured article (TFA):

Featured article tools:


How to post a new nomination:

I.
Create the nomination subpage.

In the box below, enter the full name of the article you are nominating (without using any brackets around the article's name) and click the button to create your nomination page.


II.
Write the nomination.

On that nomination page, fill out as many of the relevant parts of the pre-loaded {{TFAR nom}} template as you can, then save the page.

Your nomination should mention:

  • when the last similar article was, since this helps towards diversity on the main page (browsing Wikipedia:Today's featured article/recent TFAs will help you find out);
  • when the article was promoted to FA status (since older articles may need extra checks);
  • and (for date-specific nominations) the article's relevance for the requested date.

You're welcome to create your own TFA text as a summary of the lead section, or you can ask for assistance at WT:TFAR. We use one paragraph only, with no reference tags or alternative names; the only thing bolded is the first link to the article title. The length when previewed (including spaces) is between 925 and 1025 characters, or more when no free-use image can be found. Fair use images are not allowed.

III.
Post at TFAR.

After you have created the nomination page, add it here under a level-3 heading for the preferred date (or under a free non-specific date header). To do this, add (replacing "ARTICLE TITLE" with the name of your nominated article):
===February 29===
{{Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests/ARTICLE TITLE}}

Nominations are ordered by requested date below the summary chart. More than one article can be nominated for the same date.

It would also then be helpful to add the nomination to the summary chart, following the examples there. Please include the name of the article that you are nominating in your edit summary.

If you are not one of the article's primary editors, please then notify the primary editors of the TFA nomination; if primary editors are no longer active, please add a message to the article talk page.

Scheduling:

In the absence of exceptional circumstances, TFAs are scheduled in date order, not according to how long nominations have been open or how many supportive comments they have. So, for example, January 31 will not be scheduled until January 30 has been scheduled (by TFAR nomination or otherwise).


Summary chart[edit]

Currently accepting requests from April 27 to May 27.

Date Article Notes Supports Opposes
Nonspecific 1
Nonspecific 2
Nonspecific 3
Nonspecific 4
April 28 Thomas Crisp anniversary of birth 2 0
May 1 Green Park tube station 40th anniversary of opening of Jubilee line 3 0
May 8 Myst III: Exile anniversary of release 1 0

Tally may not be up to date. The nominator is included in the number of supporters.

Nonspecific date nominations[edit]

Nonspecific date 1[edit]

Nonspecific date 2[edit]

Nonspecific date 3[edit]

Nonspecific date 4[edit]

Specific date nominations[edit]

April 28[edit]

Thomas Crisp[edit]

Thomas Crisp RN, c. 1915-17

Skipper Thomas Crisp VC, DSC, RNR (28 April 1876 – 15 August 1917) was an English posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross. Crisp, in civilian life a commercial fisherman operating from Lowestoft in Suffolk, earned his award after being killed during the defence of his vessel, the armed naval smack His Majesty's Smack Nelson, in the North Sea against an attack from a German submarine in 1917. Thomas Crisp's self–sacrifice in the face of this "unequal struggle" was used by the government to bolster morale during some of the toughest days of the First World War for Britain, the summer and autumn of 1917, during which Britain was suffering heavy losses at the Battle of Passchendaele. His exploit was read aloud by David Lloyd George in the Houses of Parliament and made headline news for nearly a week. (Full article...)

May 1[edit]

Green Park tube station[edit]

Jubilee line platform at Green Park station with train arriving

Green Park is a London Underground station on the north side of Green Park, with entrances on both sides of Piccadilly. It is in fare zone 1 and is a busy interchange between the Jubilee, Piccadilly and Victoria lines, used by over 39 million passengers in 2017. The station was opened on 15 December 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway and was originally named Dover Street. It was modernised in the 1930s when escalators replaced lifts and new entrances were provided on Piccadilly. The Victoria line platforms opened on 7 March 1969 and the Jubilee line platforms opened on 1 May 1979 with the official opening journeys by The Queen and Prince Charles starting from this station. Improvements in the 2000s made the station wheelchair accessible throughout. The original station building designed by Leslie Green has been demolished. Decorative elements around the station include tiling schemes by Hans Unger and June Fraser and stonework by John Maine. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Currently, the most recent railway related article is AirTrain JFK scheduled for 9 March 2019. The most recent station article is Edmonds station (Washington) which was TFA on 21 December 2018.
  • Main editors: DavidCane
  • Promoted: 6 November 2018
  • Reasons for nomination: 40th anniversary of the opening of the London Underground's Jubilee line which serves this station.
  • Support as nominator. DavidCane (talk) 17:35, 23 February 2019 (UTC)
  • Support Seems a solid article and an appropriate anniversary. Gog the Mild (talk) 20:21, 23 February 2019 (UTC)
  • Support Solid, well-cited and clean article that would do well as a featured article on the main page. — Stevey7788 (talk) 03:46, 12 March 2019 (UTC)
  • The blurb was a little short, so I expanded it with material from the lead. Feel free to edit. - Dank (push to talk) 02:47, 24 February 2019 (UTC)

May 8[edit]

Myst III: Exile[edit]

Myst III: Exile is the third title in the Myst series of graphic adventure puzzle video games. While the preceding games in the series, Myst and Riven, were produced by Cyan Worlds and published by Brøderbund, Exile was developed by Presto Studios and published by Ubi Soft. The game was released on four compact discs for both Mac OS and Microsoft Windows on May 8, 2001; versions for the Xbox and PlayStation 2 were released in late 2002. As in previous games, the player assumes the role of the Stranger, a friend of Atrus. A member of the D'ni race, Atrus can create links to other worlds called Ages by writing descriptive books. In Exile, Atrus has written an Age for the D'ni to live on while rebuilding their civilization; it is stolen, however, by a mysterious figure. The Stranger pursues the thief in an attempt to reclaim Atrus' tablet. The creators of the Myst franchise gave the task of creating the third Myst game to Presto Studios, known for its adventure game series The Journeyman Project. Presto sought to develop a diverse and logical approach to puzzles and Ages, and worked to make the villain sympathetically multifaceted. Despite selling more than one million copies within the first year of release, Exile fared poorer commercially than Myst and Riven, which had sold more than 10 million copies combined. Myst IV: Revelation, the fourth game in the series, was developed and published solely by Ubisoft. (Full article...)