William Chamberlain (politician)

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William Chamberlain
Member of the
United States House of Representatives
from Vermont's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1805
Succeeded byJames Fisk
Member of the
United States House of Representatives
from Vermont's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1811
Preceded byJames Fisk
Succeeded byJames Fisk
3rd Lieutenant Governor of Vermont
In office
October 23, 1813 – October 14, 1815
GovernorMartin Chittenden
Preceded byPaul Brigham
Succeeded byPaul Brigham
Member of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1785
1787–1796
1805
1808
Personal details
Born(1755-04-27)April 27, 1755
Hopkinton, Massachusetts, U.S.
DiedSeptember 27, 1828(1828-09-27) (aged 73)
Peacham, Vermont, U.S.
Political partyFederalist Party (United States)
Spouse(s)Jame E."Jenny" Eastman
Children8
ProfessionPolitician, Teacher, Farmer

William Chamberlain (April 27, 1755 – September 27, 1828) was an American politician from Vermont. He served as a United States Representative and as the second Lieutenant Governor of Vermont.

Biography[edit]

Chamberlain was born in Hopkinton, Massachusetts to Samuel and Martha Mellen Chamberlain. He attended the common schools and worked as a school teacher in Hopkinton until he moved with his father to Loudon, New Hampshire in 1774. He served as a sergeant during the American Revolutionary War and took part in the Battles of Lexington and Concord and the invasion of Canada. He later engaged in land surveying and farming. He moved to Peacham, Vermont in 1780. Engaging in politics, he was the clerk of the proprietors of the town the same year. He was town clerk from 1785 to 1797.[1]

Chamberlain served as a member of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1785, from 1787 to 1796, in 1805 and in 1808.[2] He also served as a Justice of the Peace from 1786 to 1796[3][4] and as a delegate to the state constitutional convention in 1791. He was a member of the Vermont's Governor's Council from 1796 until 1803.[5] He was a brigadier general of the Vermont militia in 1794 and was promoted to major general in 1799.[6]

He was the assistant judge of orange County in 1795 and chief judge of Caledonia County from 1796 until 1803. He served as secretary of the board of trustees of the Caledonia County Grammar School from 1795 until 1812, and as president of the board of trustees from 1813 until 1828.[7]

Chamberlain was elected as a Federalist candidate to the Eighth Congress, serving from March 4, 1803 until March 3, 1805.[8] He was elected to the Eleventh Congress, serving from March 4, 1809 until March 3, 1811.[9]

After serving in Congress, he served as the second Lieutenant Governor of Vermont from 1813 until 1815.[10][11] He was a delegate to the state constitutional convention in 1814.[12]

Personal life[edit]

Chamberlain married Jame E. "Jenny" Eastman on March 15, 1781. They had seven children together.

Chamberlain died on September 27, 1828 in Peacham, Caledonia County, Vermont. He is interred at Peacham Village Cemetery in Peacham.

Spelling of name[edit]

He signed his name "Chamberlin" and his name appears that way in some official records and other documents.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Peacham". Ancestry.com. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  2. ^ "CHAMBERLAIN, William, (1755 - 1828)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  3. ^ "Brief History of Groton, Vermont". Ancestry.com. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  4. ^ "1884 Town Directory". Vermont Northeast Kingdom Genealogy. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  5. ^ Chamberlain Association of America. Report of annual meeting (Volume 7-13). Chamberlain Association of America. p. 23.
  6. ^ Price, Miles (2000). Chamberlain Family Papers. Vermont Historical Society.
  7. ^ "Peacham". Ancestry.com. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  8. ^ "Rep. William Chamberlain". govtrack.us. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  9. ^ "Rep. William Chamberlain". govtrack.us. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  10. ^ General Election Results Lieutenant Governor. Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. p. 1.
  11. ^ Archives. Office of Vermont Secretary of State Deb Markowitz. p. 1.
  12. ^ "WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN". Ancestry.com. Retrieved November 15, 2012.
  13. ^ Bogart, Ernest L. (2010). Peacham, the Story of a Vermont Hill Town (Reprint). Peacham Historical Association: Peacham, VT. p. 26. ISBN 978-0-9844-7383-0.

Further reading[edit]

  • "Chamberlain Family Papers", published by Vermont Historical Society in September 2000.

External links[edit]


U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District created
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 3rd congressional district

1803-1805
Succeeded by
James Fisk
Preceded by
James Fisk
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 3rd congressional district

1809-1811
Succeeded by
James Fisk
Political offices
Preceded by
James Fisk
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont
1813–1815
Succeeded by
James Fisk