William S. Youngman

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William Sterling Youngman
William S. Youngman.png
50th Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
In office
1929–1933
GovernorFrank G. Allen
Joseph B. Ely
Preceded byFrank G. Allen
Succeeded byGaspar G. Bacon
42nd Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts
In office
1925–1928
GovernorAlvan T. Fuller
Preceded byJames Jackson
Succeeded byJohn W. Haigis
Member of the
Massachusetts State Senate
Norfolk and Suffolk District[2]
In office
1923[1] – 1924[1]
Preceded byWesley E. Monk
Succeeded byErland F. Fish
Personal details
BornFebruary 2, 1872[1]
Williamsport, Pennsylvania
DiedApril 25, 1934[3] (aged 62)
Brookline, Massachusetts[3]
Political partyRepublican[1]
ChildrenWilliam Sterling Youngman, Jr.[4]
Alma materHarvard College
A.B. 1895;
Harvard Law School
L.L.B. 1898[5]
ProfessionAttorney
Military service
Branch/serviceUnited States Army
Years of service1898
1918
RankCaptain
Battles/warsSpanish–American War
World War I

William Sterling Youngman (February 2, 1872 – April 25, 1934) was an American politician who served as a Massachusetts State Senator, the Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts and as the 50th Lieutenant Governor for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1929 to 1933.

Youngman attended Harvard, where he was a member of the debate team.[6]

Youngman served with a troop of Pennsylvania Cavalry during the Spanish–American War; he also served in World War I.[4]

In 1932 Youngman was the Republican nominee for Governor of Massachusetts, he lost that election by about 150,000 votes to the incumbent Democratic Governor Joseph B. Ely.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Howard, Richard T. (1929), Public officials of Massachusetts (1929–1930), Boston, MA: The Boston Review, p. Page 22.
  2. ^ Howard, Richard T. (1923), Public officials of Massachusetts 1923–1924, Boston, MA: The Boston Review, p. Page 84.
  3. ^ a b W. S. Youngman, Ex-Lieut. Governor Of Bay State, Dies Republican Best Known as Foe of Wasteful Public Expenditures, Hartford, Conn.: The Hartford Courant, April 26, 1934, p. 4.
  4. ^ a b The New York Times (April 26, 1934), W. S. YOUNGMAN,.62, CIVIC LEADER, DEAD; Former Bay State Lieutenant Governor Noted for Attack on Public Wastefulness, SOUGHT OFFICE AFTER, 50 Frequently at Odds With Party Heads Served as Captain in the World War., New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, p. Section: BOOKS ART-BOOKS, Page 23.
  5. ^ Quinquennial Catalogue of the Officers and Graduates 1636–1905, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1923, p. 303.
  6. ^ The New York Times (March 9, 1896), HARVARD'S GREAT DEBATE; Ready Now for the Coming Contest with Princeton. UNUSUAL INTEREST IN THE STRUGGLE The Men Chosen to Strive for Victory -- Why the Contest Is Attracting So Much Attention., New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, p. 10.
  7. ^ Special to The New York Times (November 9, 1932), Article 42 -- No Title, New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, p. 3.
Political offices
Preceded by
Frank G. Allen
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
1929 – 1933
Succeeded by
Gaspar G. Bacon
Preceded by
James Jackson
Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts
1925 – 1928
Succeeded by
John W. Haigis
Preceded by
Wesley E. Monk
Member of the
Massachusetts State Senate
Norfolk and Suffolk District

1923 – 1924
Succeeded by
Erland F. Fish
Party political offices
Preceded by
Frank G. Allen
Massachusetts Republican Party gubernatorial candidate
1932 (lost)
Succeeded by
Gaspar G. Bacon