Sealed with a kiss! Princess Diana and Charles' wedding day smooch is voted the country's most memorable - followed by William and Kate's

  • Princess Diana and Charles's wedding kiss has been voted the most memorable
  • It is followed by Prince William and Kate wedding day kiss on the balcony in 2011
  • Researchers from the HISTORY channel commissioned poll ahead of new series 

Princess Diana and Charles' wedding day kiss on the balcony at Buckingham Palace has been voted Britain's most memorable smooch.

A UK study found the 1981 moment of affection is still at the top of the nation's minds, followed by Prince William and Kate Middleton's embrace on the same balcony in 2011, and Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's kiss on the steps outside St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, last year when they wed.

The research, commissioned by the HISTORY channel ahead of their series Photos That Changed the World, asked respondents to rate kisses that they thought were memorable.

An astounding quarter of respondents said Princess Diana's heartwarming kiss with the heir to the throne was their most memorable moment.  

Princess Diana and Prince Charles's smooch on the balcony of Buckingham Palace was voted Britain's most memorable kiss in a poll for the HISTORY channel

Princess Diana and Prince Charles's smooch on the balcony of Buckingham Palace was voted Britain's most memorable kiss in a poll for the HISTORY channel

It was followed by Prince William and Kate Middleton's kiss almost 30 years later on the balcony of Buckingham Palace

It was followed by Prince William and Kate Middleton's kiss almost 30 years later on the balcony of Buckingham Palace

The Queen's eldest son and former nanny wed in St Paul's Cathedral in front of a congregation of 3,500 people that included Mary Robertson, who used to employ the Princess at £4 an hour rate, Margaret Thatcher and Camilla Parker-Bowles.

An incredible 600,000 people thronged the streets of London to catch a glimpse of Prince Charles and Diana on their wedding day, while a further 750million watched the nuptials on television, reports the BBC.

Prince William and Kate Middleton's dramatic embrace on the balcony of Buckingham Palace almost 30 years later was voted the second most memorable, with 24 per cent of respondents voting for them.

Before the famous kiss pair married earlier that day at Westminster Abbey in front of a star-studded congregation numbering 1,900, which included David Beckham and his wife Victoria Beckham, Sir Elton John and Rowan Atkinson.

The ceremony smashed a Guinness World Record for the number of viewers, becoming the most live streamed event and beating Michael Jackson's funeral, after 72million people tuned in on YouTube alone. 

And Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's kiss last year on the steps outside St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, was voted the third most memorable royal smooch

And Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's kiss last year on the steps outside St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, was voted the third most memorable royal smooch

The Queen's second son Prince Andrew and his kiss with Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson in 1986 was not included in the poll

The Queen's second son Prince Andrew and his kiss with Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson in 1986 was not included in the poll

While Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's kiss on the steps of St George's chapel, Windsor Castle, last year was voted the third most memorable royal kiss.

The nuptials attracted an audience of 29million in America, while in the UK an estimated 18million tuned in for the event.

After saying their vows in front of a smaller congregation of 600, the pair left for the wedding reception at St George’s Hall in Windsor Castle.

Actress Priyanka Chopra, designer Misha Nonoo, Oprah Winfrey and Sir Elton John were invited to the ceremony.

Other famous royal smooches such as the Queen's second son Prince Andrew's wedding day kiss with Sarah Ferguson, and their younger daughter Princess Eugenie's nuptial lip-lock with Jack Brooksbank, were not included in the poll.

The research also showed that non-royal famous kisses were also memorable. These included Lady and the Tramp's 1955 spaghetti kiss, which drew with William and Kate, and the moment a US navy sailor embraced a young woman in Times Square, New York, in 1945.

Similarly last year's kiss between Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, was also not included in the poll

Similarly last year's kiss between Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, was also not included in the poll

Other memorable smooches that were mentioned include the 1951 spagetti kiss between Lady and the Tramp, which got as many votes as William and Kate

Other memorable smooches that were mentioned include the 1951 spagetti kiss between Lady and the Tramp, which got as many votes as William and Kate

The moment a US Navy sailor embraces a woman in Times Square, New York, in 1945 also received a large number of votes in the poll

The moment a US Navy sailor embraces a woman in Times Square, New York, in 1945 also received a large number of votes in the poll

Speaking about the survey results, a spokesman for HISTORY channel said: 'The photo of Charles and Diana is iconic but it wasn’t even planned, as they had forgotten to kiss at the end of the ceremony.

'Of course, the kiss is imbued with poignancy when we look back on it now, as we know the tragic fate that awaited the People’s Princess.'

Although they seemed to be in a fairy tale marriage, it later emerged that their relationship began to fall apart behind the palace walls soon after the wedding. 

They divorced in August 1996, but just a year later Diana died in a car crash in Paris.

The new series, which will include Charles and Diana's photo, will air tomorrow. 

Princess Diana and Charles' kiss at Buckingham Palace voted country's most memorable smooch

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