Notorious drug dealer films 'first footage of Charles Bronson in a decade' after he sets up YouTube account from his prison cell

  • Sam Walker has been able to maintain multiple social media while inside prison
  • His Twitter account has around 19,000 followers and his YouTube around 1,000 
  • In one video, Walker claims to have filmed 'camera shy' Bronson stealing coffee
  • Bronson not seen for a decade - but some have questioned if it is really him 
  • He is currently serving 33 months in category B Leeds prison 

A notorious prisoner has been running a Twitter and YouTube account from behind bars using an illegal mobile phone - and even claims to have filmed notorious criminal Charles Bronson.

Convicted drug dealer Sam Walker, who infamously taunted police while on the run in Africa, has been able to maintain multiple social media accounts while serving time in prisons in the Midlands and the north of England.

His Twitter account has around 19,000 followers and his YouTube around 1,000 subscribers, both of which have been set up from his prison cell in the past week. 

In one video, Walker claims to have filmed 'camera shy' Charles Bronson - who has spent much of the past four decades imprisoned for a series of violent crimes. 

A caption alongside the video said: 'Big Charlie Bronson becomes camera shy while I video him. All 6ft5ins & 20 stone of him.'  

Some have questioned if it is really Bronson, dubbed Britain's most dangerous prisoner, who was reported to be in HMP Woodhill in Milton Keynes for the past year and has a far gruffer voice than the man in the video.

Walker, who has 45 convictions for 130 offences, is back in jail for drug and driving convictions and skipping court by hiring a private plane to fly to West Africa. He is currently serving 33 months in category B Leeds prison.

Convicted drug dealer Sam Walker has been able to maintain multiple social media accounts while serving time in Leeds (pictured, an image he posted of himself at HMP Peterborough)

Convicted drug dealer Sam Walker has been able to maintain multiple social media accounts while serving time in Leeds (pictured, an image he posted of himself at HMP Peterborough)

His Twitter account has around 19,000 followers (pictured) and his Youtube around 1,000 subscribers, both of which have been uploaded to in the past week

His Twitter account has around 19,000 followers (pictured) and his Youtube around 1,000 subscribers, both of which have been uploaded to in the past week

In one video, Walker claims to have filmed 'camera shy' Bronson (allegedly pictured) - who has spent much of the past four decades imprisoned for a series of violent crimes

In one video, Walker claims to have filmed 'camera shy' Bronson (allegedly pictured) - who has spent much of the past four decades imprisoned for a series of violent crimes

If it is genuine it would be the first footage of Bronson in a decade, with the criminal having dealt with his divorce from and the subsequent death of Coronation Street actress Paula Williamson in the intervening years.

But the prisoner's voice in the clip does not appear to match previous telephone interviews recorded with him during his years inside. 

His channel comes just one year after Walker, who has more than 100 offences under his belt, taunted police by releasing a video with a step-by-step guide on how to flee the country. 

At the time, he was wanted for failing to show up for court for driving without a licence. He was eventually arrested, but his social media activity appears to have continued behind bars.

Prison Officers' Association chairman Mark Fairhurst has reacted with anger at the news Walker has been able to use a mobile phone behind bars.

He told the BBC: 'What we need is for the officers to get in that cell and get [the phone] off him, but they have ingenious ways of hiding mobile phones.

'If in fact he uses the popular choice, and he secretes the mobile phone in his person, we do not have the authority to take it from him.

'We're very reliant on storming in his cell and getting it while he's using it. It is very frustrating.'

It is thought to be the first footage of Bronson in a decade (pictured in 2001 leaving The High Court in London), with the criminal having dealt with his divorce from and the subsequent death of Coronation Street actress Paula Williamson in the intervening years

It is thought to be the first footage of Bronson in a decade (pictured in 2001 leaving The High Court in London), with the criminal having dealt with his divorce from and the subsequent death of Coronation Street actress Paula Williamson in the intervening years

It is thought to be the first footage of Bronson in a decade, with Sam Walker (pictured) taunting the man in his videos uploaded to his YouTube account in the past week
The prison has now been made aware of Walker's phone, and 'immediate action' has been taken according to Sedexo, which runs the jail in conjunction with the MOJ

It is thought to be the first footage of Bronson in a decade, with Sam Walker (left and right) taunting the man in his videos uploaded to his YouTube account in the past week

The prison has now been made aware of Walker's phone, and 'immediate action' has been taken according to Sedexo, which runs the jail in conjunction with the MOJ. The prisoner's Twitter account has now been deleted.

During Walker's previous escapade, where he showed people how to flee the country, he fled to Sierra Leone on an 5,000 epic journey. 

He chartered private jets before hitching a ride on a cargo ship to reach the country where he is considered as something of a hero by locals for his charity work.

Shortly after arriving, he sent a video to friends in the UK, bragging about giving British police the slip.   

However in the short clip he taunts the wrong police force. A spokesmen for Merseyside Police said it was actually Cheshire Police who were after him.  

Walker claims to be in the country to lobby for better conditions for residents.   

His channel comes just one year after Walker, who has more than 100 offences under his belt, taunted police by releasing a video with a step-by-step guide on how to flee the country

His channel comes just one year after Walker, who has more than 100 offences under his belt, taunted police by releasing a video with a step-by-step guide on how to flee the country

During Walker's previous escapade, where he showed people how to flee the country, the criminal, who once threatened to end the career of Chelsea ace Ross Barkley, fled to Sierra Leone on an 5,000 epic journey

During Walker's previous escapade, where he showed people how to flee the country, the criminal, who once threatened to end the career of Chelsea ace Ross Barkley, fled to Sierra Leone on an 5,000 epic journey

Life and times of Charlie Bronson, the man dubbed 'Britain's most dangerous prisoner'

Pictured: Charles Bronson

Pictured: Charles Bronson  

Charles Bronson, whose original name was Michael Gordon Peterson, was born in Luton, Bedfordshire, in 1952.

From a young age Bronson indulged in petty crime, joining a gang of four robbers at the age of 13.

He was given a number of suspended sentences and reprimands until he was first sent to jail for armed robbery in 1974 for seven years aged 22.

While in Walton Gaol, he randomly attacked two prisoners and was sent to Hull the following year.

In the next few years, Bronson continued to attack other inmates, adding months to his sentence and being switched between prisons.

At HMP Wandsworth, he tried to poison another prisoner, leading to him being sent to Parkhurst psychiatric facility where he befriended the infamous Kray twins. 

He even described the pair, who ruled the East End of London with their gang during the 1950s and 1960s, as 'the best two guys I've ever met'.

Again, he continued to attack other prisoners, threaten police officers, took people hostage and even attempted suicide as he was moved from prison to prison.

In 1982, he performed a rooftop protest at Broadmoor, removing tiles from the top of the building. He took part in a number of protests over the years, causing hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of damage.

He was released in 1987, and began boxing in the East End of London, changing his name to Charles Bronson after the actor.

After just 69 days of freedom, he was once again jailed for armed robbery for seven years in 1988. 

In 1989, he created a spear out of a broken bottle and a broom handle and ran riot in the nude. 

Three years later, he was released - this time lasting 53 days outside jail. He was arrested for conspiracy to rob.

In 1993, he took a librarian hostage and asked police to get him a cup of tea, a helicopter, and an inflatable doll.

Three years later, he took two Iraqi prisoners hostage in Belmarsh, demanding a plane, sub-machine guns and ice cream from police negotiators before releasing them.

He was handed a life sentence in 1999 for taking Phil Danielson hostage and trashing the prison in a 44-hour long siege.  

In 2001, he married Fatema Saira Rehman, and converted to Islam, demanding to be known as Charles Ali Ahmed. After they divorced four years later, he renounced the religion.

In 2014, he changed his name to Charles Salvador, after Salvador Dali.  

Bronson and Paula Williamson met in 2016, and Bronson later proposed to her in 2017 by serenading her a version of the Frank Sinatra classic My Way, from a prison pay phone.

They married in November 2017, and walked down the aisle to the Death March. They had their marriage annulled in June 2019.

In total, Bronson has taken hostages in ten prison sieges and attacked at least 20 prison officers. 

Notorious inmate who taunted police while on the run now sets up YouTube account from his jail cell

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