Prince Harry will be called on to apologise for the 'monster' of apartheid as he prepares to tour township on first day of South African tour with Meghan Markle

  • The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will visit District Six in Cape Town after landing
  • District Six was where 60,000 people were forcibly removed during apartheid 
  • However, activists are unhappy that they haven't been invited to meet the royals 

Prince Harry has been urged to apologise for Britain's role in creating the 'monster' apartheid as he, Meghan and baby Archie start their tour of South Africa today. 

The Duke and Duchess will visit some of Cape Town's most impoverished townships and also go to District Six, where 60,000 people were forcibly removed during apartheid.

Freed slaves, artisans, immigrants, merchants and the Cape Malay community lived in District 6 until the government declared it a whites-only area in 1966. 

The residents were forcibly removed and relocated to the Cape Flats Township.

News of the royal visit to District Six today has angered activists representing 3,000 families who have fought to return to the area. 

They are unhappy that they have not been invited to participate in Harry and Meghan's trip to the District Six Museum. 

Prince Harry has come under fire and been told to apologise for Britain's role in creating apartheid

Prince Harry has come under fire and been told to apologise for Britain's role in creating apartheid

Shahied Ajam, chairman of the District Six working committee, even called on Harry to apologise for 'the monster that his forebears created' adding that he was perplexed at the lack of invite for his group. 

He told the Times: 'Prince Harry is a representative of a former colonial power that was the architect of what transpired in District Six.

'Forced removals and the other apartheid evils had their roots in colonialism. 

'So why weren't we, as a major stakeholder, told about the visit or invited to participate? For me that is an indication from the royal house that they are not interested in the plight of the people of District Six.'  

Harry and Meghan, with baby Archie in tow, have decided not to arrange any kind of official arrival when they touch down in Cape Town.

Instead, they intend to slip through a VIP exit and head to to their home for the week — believed to be the High Commissioner's residence in the city - to settle him down with his nanny before heading off on their first engagement.

Due to an increase in crime and recent demonstrations against appalling levels of violence against women, the heightened security situation in South Africa currently means that many of the couple's engagements cannot be announced in advance.

However, they will be visiting several townships after their arrival, with their first engagement seeing them meet children who are being taught safety training and self-defence classes.

The Duke and Duchess will visit District Six, where 60,000 people were forcibly removed during apartheid

The Duke and Duchess will visit District Six, where 60,000 people were forcibly removed during apartheid

They will then visit District Six , where, for over a hundred years before apartheid, the different communities and races lived side by side, and the District became known for its vibrant culture, music and food. 

Upon arrival, Their Royal Highnesses will be greeted by Bonita Bennett, the Director of District 6 Museum, who will lead them on a tour of the exhibitions. 

This will begin with an interactive map, explaining the history of District 6, where until apartheid, the Cape Malay community lived in harmony. 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will view music and cultural exhibits, accompanied by an artist, jazz musician and former resident of the area. 

Their Royal Highnesses will then visit the nearby District 6 Homecoming Centre where they will be met by a small group of former residents. 

The Museum and Homecoming Centre were built to provide former residents with a meeting place, to return to where they used to live, share their memories, cook together, create music and take part in cultural activities.

Harry, Meghan and Archie will land in Cape Town today for their first official trip as a family of three

Harry, Meghan and Archie will land in Cape Town today for their first official trip as a family of three

Harry and Meghan will join the residents in some food preparations before sitting down with them to sample some of the varied cuisines that demonstrate the cultural diversity of District 6. 

During the meal, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will have an opportunity to hear from the residents, and their experiences of living in, and leaving the area.

Meghan will then exchange a copy of Together, the Hubb Community Kitchen cookery book, with some of the contributors to the District 6 Cookery book.

In her first philanthropic endeavor as a member of the royal family, The Duchess of Sussex worked with a group of London women, whom in the aftermath of the 2017 Grenfell Tower fire in west London, gathered to cook fresh food for their families and neighbours. 

They discovered the power of cooking and eating together to create connections, restore hope and normality - which was the start of the Hubb Community Kitchen. 

The Duchess of Sussex, together with the women of the Hubb Community Kitchen created Together, a cookery book showcasing over 50 of their personal recipes. 

The Duchess of Sussex wrote the foreword to Together.

Prince Harry will be called on to apologise for the 'monster' of apartheid

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